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  1. #301

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    Ah, you've seen it too!

    (I meant the Charlton Heston one, of course. I forgot the 1925 silent version which was also excellent)

    Xhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xX90wV6iUPIX

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #302

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post
    Personally, I would like to hear his take on the discussion just a few posts above. In his opinion does BH think of the dim/6 scale as a harmonic device separate from single line improvisation? As noted above, in the DVD BH says he has a "special" scale for playing over "minor". That turns out to be the dim/min6 scale. However, nowhere else (at least in the first set of DVD's) does he seem to use his dim/6/min6 scales for single note lines. Does BH suggest working out changes of a song by playing the dim/min6 scale over the dominant chords (from the important minor) or the dim/maj6 scale over major cords, or even the dim/dom and dim/minb7 scales? Or was that an exception for emphasizing a minor tonal center?
    This guys videos are great. In the latest he does in fact explain that Barry uses the minor 6 diminished scale in lines. First part of the video, featuring What Is This Thing Called Love, works diminished lines over the G-7b5 - C7b9 before moving to F-6dim melodic ideas over the Fm.


  4. #303

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    Thanks guys so much for help with Easy Living, it all makes a ton of sense now, you guys are fantastic!

    -----

    I have another standard's question.. How High the Moon vs Ornithology. Ornithology is a contrafact I know but are the chords EXACTLY the same? I don't think so.. I'd like to play both correctly so i'm using the chart in Barry's 1st DVD for HHTM but for Ornithology, I see different changes all the time among different charts. I'm asking because we know how particular Barry is about getting the tune right, and there's quite a few versions bouncing around out there, what do you guys usually play on Ornithology?

    Ornithology

    A Section
    | GMaj7 | GMaj7 | Gm7 | C7 |
    | FMaj7 | FMaj7 | Fm7 | Bb7 |
    | Eb7 (in HHTM this is EbMaj7) | Am7b5 D7 | Gm7 | (Cm7b5) D7 (or this bar is a 2nd bar Gm7 as well) |
    | Bm7 (in other versions this GMaj7) | E7 | Am7 | D7 |

    B Section
    | GMaj7 | GMaj7 | Gm7 | C7 |
    | FMaj7 | FMaj7 | Fm7 | Bb7 |
    | Eb7 | Am7b5 D7 | GMaj7 | Cm7 F7 or Am7 D7 (this bar confuses me) |
    | Bm7 E7 (or Bb7) | Am7 D7 | Gmaj7 solo | break |
    -----

    On a side note, the conversation with Howard Rees was great I'll have it up on Aug 11, what a gentleman. I reached out to Justin Robinson, fingers crossed he's down to chat. I reached out to Smalls so I could obtain Sacha Perry and William Ash's contacts, it would be lovely to talk to them as well.

    The Grasso brothers are amazing, unreal musicians. I wish there were more great players like them out there that really know Barry's stuff inside and out.
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  5. #304

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    Well, Ben Hur is also the title of a movie, you see. It's a pun on the name Ben Hur. With Pasquale, I find how he plays a bit lyrical for my taste, a bit, shall we say, extravagant, which rather reminds me of the Italian character, all that arm-waving and issimo, and so on.

    That's basically the drift of it. Naturally it's a rather subjective view so I wouldn't expect everyone to share it. Especially if they've never heard of Ben Hur, the movie.

    (That would be the original, incidentally, not the remake which really shouldn't have been made at all. Dreadful).
    Eh? Ok.

    No I would say you are never hearing something new per se with these players, but that’s not the point. They are world class at a certain thing.

    It not the point so much for me. It’s more like studying baroque counterpoint. It doesn’t mean a composer will end up writing pastiche Bach for a living. Brad Mehldau went to Barry’s workshops back in the 90s iirc and he’s not playing bop (although he certainly can.)

    I’m at a weird crossroads with my playing. I feel I’ve got to a point where I play bebop competently and that’s largely thanks to Barry’s materials which I also teach to others.

    In terms of what I do now, it’s not so clear. A lot of London straight ahead players do the tribute band thing because it’s easier to sell. But I literally just want to play jazz in my own voice, whatever that is.

    I suppose it’s daft to expect people to pay money to hear that lol.

  6. #305

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Eh? Ok.

    No I would say you are never hearing something new per se with these players, but that’s not the point. They are world class at a certain thing.

    It not the point so much for me. It’s more like studying baroque counterpoint. It doesn’t mean a composer will end up writing pastiche Bach for a living. Brad Mehldau went to Barry’s workshops back in the 90s iirc and he’s not playing bop (although he certainly can.)

    I’m at a weird crossroads with my playing. I feel I’ve got to a point where I play bebop competently and that’s largely thanks to Barry’s materials which I also teach to others.

    In terms of what I do now, it’s not so clear. A lot of London straight ahead players do the tribute band thing because it’s easier to sell. But I literally just want to play jazz in my own voice, whatever that is.

    I suppose it’s daft to expect people to pay money to hear that lol.
    About the London thing, I get you. Unless you're backed by giles Peterson or you play afro beat/dance/groove stuff it's hard to get jazz gigs. I have a band that takes Turkish and Greek, and some balkaln traditional tunes and we put some modern harmony over it, play modal and it's really hard to get gigs, it's been almost two years. London scene is dominated by the same people, they're great don't get me wrong but the scene for straight ahead isn't as prolific as it was even 3 years ago. Just my opinion, sorry for going off topic.

  7. #306

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    About the London thing, I get you. Unless you're backed by giles Peterson or you play afro beat/dance/groove stuff it's hard to get jazz gigs. I have a band that takes Turkish and Greek, and some balkaln traditional tunes and we put some modern harmony over it, play modal and it's really hard to get gigs, it's been almost two years. London scene is dominated by the same people, they're great don't get me wrong but the scene for straight ahead isn't as prolific as it was even 3 years ago. Just my opinion, sorry for going off topic.
    That’s hilarious, that’s what I was playing last night, a few Longas, a bit of Balkan stuff, and a fair amount of modern jazz wankery. Do you know Shirley Smart by any chance?

    Re: modern jazz. I think it’s a bit of a clique, but I know most of the scene and they’re mostly really cool people. The trick with the 606 and places like that AFAIK is getting on the radar. There’s a lot of hanging out and networking for getting these gigs.... personally I think it’s on having a good strong project and pushing the hell out of it. You need to be really persistent as well as having a strong project.

  8. #307

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    The other thing is there are a LOT of really good jazz guitarists in London right now. Some of whom are relatively obscure but always working because they are great sidemen, some of whom are great and also very good at self promoting and band leading, and some of whom who but also appear to be getting a strong PR push that may last a limited time till the next ‘rising star’ comes along.

    And quite a few who are great but end up teaching.

    Every pro has to find their niche in their ecosystem.... my professional niche is/was playing 30s/40s swing guitar for a long time - beats the usual top 40 covers, but now I want to get into something a bit more interesting...

    There are people out there earning decent money playing interesting gigs. The secret is in the admin and the office work. That’s the boring truth.....

  9. #308

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    Warming up barry harris chops for the workshop in london next week..
    I haven't heard any guitarist in london play stuff like this. There's one guitarist named Ofer Landsberg who was one of barry's students here in London, who's hot on this stuff but other than that, no one i've heard plays that stuff.

    I’ll see you in class.

  10. #309

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Eh? Ok.

    No I would say you are never hearing something new per se with these players, but that’s not the point. They are world class at a certain thing.

    It not the point so much for me. It’s more like studying baroque counterpoint. It doesn’t mean a composer will end up writing pastiche Bach for a living. Brad Mehldau went to Barry’s workshops back in the 90s iirc and he’s not playing bop (although he certainly can.)

    I’m at a weird crossroads with my playing. I feel I’ve got to a point where I play bebop competently and that’s largely thanks to Barry’s materials which I also teach to others.

    In terms of what I do now, it’s not so clear. A lot of London straight ahead players do the tribute band thing because it’s easier to sell. But I literally just want to play jazz in my own voice, whatever that is.

    I suppose it’s daft to expect people to pay money to hear that lol.
    Thanks.

    I can hear what they're doing, of course, but I don't always warm to it. It's a personal thing (or at least that's the get-out clause; I'm not always sure that it is an entirely subjective thing) but I prefer the rather 'flat' sound of jazz guitar a la Wes, Pass, Eddie Diehl, and so on. To me, that's authentic. I find a lot of new stuff too fiddly. Nicely played but probably over-technical, I don't know.

    Fact is, I think some players are just naturally better than others. They communicate better, they impact more. They draw the listener along with them more. I don't find Grasso that interesting, to be honest. I also don't quite know how much he's done and I think his sources are too various. I find myself watching him rather objectively rather than simply enjoying his playing. I find myself feeling distanced from it, if you see what I mean.

    Re. finding your own voice, I think that's a two-edged sword. Play nice bop and people will rally. Play what you find attractive to you, in a style natural to you, and they may not. To be somewhat philosophical about it, it has a lot to do with how well one knows oneself first. Any voice has to start with oneself, at the centre. If one hasn't got that then how can they find themselves musically?

    Also, the one thing that stops people thinking originally is that they've accepted so many ideas from others for so long. One ought to find a way of utilising ideas from 'outside' without becoming a mere copyist. I always shrink a bit when I hear people saying 'I want to play like so-and-so'. I understand it but one doesn't want to end up being a mere imitator. Imitation and originality don't go together.

    I'm not sure one can deliberately construct one's own voice anyway, it's one of those things that finds you. It evolves, it comes, and one day it's there.

  11. #310

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    That’s hilarious, that’s what I was playing last night, a few Longas, a bit of Balkan stuff, and a fair amount of modern jazz wankery. Do you know Shirley Smart by any chance?

    Re: modern jazz. I think it’s a bit of a clique, but I know most of the scene and they’re mostly really cool people. The trick with the 606 and places like that AFAIK is getting on the radar. There’s a lot of hanging out and networking for getting these gigs.... personally I think it’s on having a good strong project and pushing the hell out of it. You need to be really persistent as well as having a strong project.

    I hear what you're saying man, my project that I co-lead got a gig at Lancaster jazz Fest in September, probably the biggest gig I will play to date, super excited for that. Just gotta keep pushing it!

  12. #311

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’ll see you in class.
    I'm outraged.

  13. #312

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’ll see you in class.
    Gonna be such a roast

  14. #313
    record some!!!
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  15. #314

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    I guess you Londoner's deserve it. With all the astronomical rent that I am NOT paying because I don't live in London, I should be able to afford to fly wherever Barry Harris gives workshops
    Ok, I'm not bitter anymore.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 08-02-2018 at 01:18 PM.

  16. #315

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    Thanks.

    I can hear what they're doing, of course, but I don't always warm to it. It's a personal thing (or at least that's the get-out clause; I'm not always sure that it is an entirely subjective thing) but I prefer the rather 'flat' sound of jazz guitar a la Wes, Pass, Eddie Diehl, and so on. To me, that's authentic. I find a lot of new stuff too fiddly. Nicely played but probably over-technical, I don't know.

    Fact is, I think some players are just naturally better than others. They communicate better, they impact more. They draw the listener along with them more. I don't find Grasso that interesting, to be honest. I also don't quite know how much he's done and I think his sources are too various. I find myself watching him rather objectively rather than simply enjoying his playing. I find myself feeling distanced from it, if you see what I mean.

    Re. finding your own voice, I think that's a two-edged sword. Play nice bop and people will rally. Play what you find attractive to you, in a style natural to you, and they may not. To be somewhat philosophical about it, it has a lot to do with how well one knows oneself first. Any voice has to start with oneself, at the centre. If one hasn't got that then how can they find themselves musically?

    Also, the one thing that stops people thinking originally is that they've accepted so many ideas from others for so long. One ought to find a way of utilising ideas from 'outside' without becoming a mere copyist. I always shrink a bit when I hear people saying 'I want to play like so-and-so'. I understand it but one doesn't want to end up being a mere imitator. Imitation and originality don't go together.

    I'm not sure one can deliberately construct one's own voice anyway, it's one of those things that finds you. It evolves, it comes, and one day it's there.
    I think that’s very true.

    Pasquale seems to be quite popular among young players - he may be the new guy that everyone copies in a couple of years like Kurt was 10 years ago....

    I expect the Barry workshop to be packed

  17. #316
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post

    Pasquale seems to be quite popular among young players - he may be the new guy that everyone copies in a couple of years like Kurt was 10 years ago....
    I hope so!

    This type of harmony is romantic, warm, flowing, and linear.

    What I hear more commonly among guitarists is more "cool" (maj 7th chords and tonic min7), with more leaps in the harmony, i guess..."angular?" ambiguous?

    either way, There's a world of difference between what Ozzy played and what your "typical" guy would play.

    Preference is completely subjective. My preference is obvious, so I'd love to see more guys playing like this.
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  18. #317
    I'd jsut like to add, you don't need to be an insane virtuoso like Pasquale to pull it off. I play everything slow, and Ozz man sounded good without shredding your face off
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  19. #318
    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    I guess you Londoner's deserve it. With all the astronomical rent that I am NOT paying because I don't live in London, I should be able to afford to fly where ever Barry Harris gives workshops
    Ok, I'm not bitter anymore.
    Yep. Talk to some New Yorkers about his inexpensive weekly classes. Insane. They're crazy cheap if I remember correctly. 10 bucks or something?

    Sent from my SM-J727P using Tapatalk

  20. #319

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Yep. Talk to some New Yorkers about his inexpensive weekly classes. Insane. They're crazy cheap if I remember correctly. 10 bucks or something?

    Sent from my SM-J727P using Tapatalk
    Yes. Although NY must be a depressing place for those of us who aren't Pascale or Rosenwinkel.
    If I lived in NY, I'd probably give up jazz and pursue knitting or something.

  21. #320

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    I live in NYC and can get my ass kicked on any given day.
    For that matter, there are likely tons of people killing it with knitting needles as well.
    Lots of talent in this town.

  22. #321

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    NYC no doubt is the best place to be to learn jazz. One formula would be to get experience in NYC and move to Godforsakenville and be the big fish in small pond. But then knitting is the more responsible career choice.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 08-02-2018 at 04:26 PM.

  23. #322

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yes. Although NY must be a depressing place for those of us who aren't Pascale or Rosenwinkel.
    If I lived in NY, I'd probably give up jazz and pursue knitting or something.
    The NYC knitting scene is tough. First you have to get through a ‘cutting contest’ which involves shearing a sheep. Only then are you allowed to ‘sit in’ with your needles and wool.

  24. #323

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    I'd jsut like to add, you don't need to be an insane virtuoso like Pasquale to pull it off. I play everything slow, and Ozz man sounded good without shredding your face off
    Joe, man too many kind words! I think this stuff pretty much plays itself! The beauty is that from one scale there are endless possibilities, not to mention it's singleine applications.

    Tbh I think pasuqales playing is really pretty. His sound, execution, and vibe brings it all together you can hear his love for what he does. I feel he truly does tell a story.

    One of my faves:

  25. #324
    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post

    Tbh I think pasuqales playing is really pretty. His sound, execution, and vibe brings it all together you can hear his love for what he does. I feel he truly does tell a story.
    Yeah people get distracted by his virtuosity and he gets labeled as over technical etc... bummer
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  26. #325

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    The NYC knitting scene is tough. First you have to get through a ‘cutting contest’ which involves shearing a sheep. Only then are you allowed to ‘sit in’ with your needles and wool.
    Yeah but some of those knitters are so technical, the sweaters come out with almost factory made precision. They lack the human touch.

  27. #326
    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yeah but some of those knitters are so technical, the sweaters come out with almost factory made precision. They lack the human touch.
    lol!
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  28. #327

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    The NYC knitting scene is tough. First you have to get through a ‘cutting contest’ which involves shearing a sheep. Only then are you allowed to ‘sit in’ with your needles and wool.
    ...on top of all that, the 'pay to play' rule is ridiculous. I was fleeced last time I tried to show off my chops at a 55 Baa session.

  29. #328
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    ...on top of all that, the 'pay to play' rule is ridiculous. I was fleeced last time I tried to show off my chops at a 55 Baa session.
    that is ridiculous


    but also a very top notch pun
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  30. #329

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    Quote Originally Posted by nikhilhogan View Post
    I have another standard's question.. How High the Moon vs Ornithology. Ornithology is a contrafact I know but are the chords EXACTLY the same? I don't think so.. I'd like to play both correctly so i'm using the chart in Barry's 1st DVD for HHTM but for Ornithology, I see different changes all the time among different charts. I'm asking because we know how particular Barry is about getting the tune right, and there's quite a few versions bouncing around out there, what do you guys usually play on Ornithology?

    Ornithology

    A Section
    | GMaj7 | GMaj7 | Gm7 | C7 |
    | FMaj7 | FMaj7 | Fm7 | Bb7 |
    | Eb7 (in HHTM this is EbMaj7) | Am7b5 D7 | Gm7 | (Cm7b5) D7 (or this bar is a 2nd bar Gm7 as well) |
    | Bm7 (in other versions this GMaj7) | E7 | Am7 | D7 |

    B Section
    | GMaj7 | GMaj7 | Gm7 | C7 |
    | FMaj7 | FMaj7 | Fm7 | Bb7 |
    | Eb7 | Am7b5 D7 | GMaj7 | Cm7 F7 or Am7 D7 (this bar confuses me) |
    | Bm7 E7 (or Bb7) | Am7 D7 | Gmaj7 solo | break |
    -----
    Playing Ornithology correctly depends on which version of the tune you're covering. Both the A and B sections of the 1946 Dial session have a repeated, rising triplet figure over the last four bars that was often passed among the instruments and tended to get a bit wayward on live recordings. Parker replaced the triplets with a couple of more developed lines sometime before the 1948 Roost gigs and the final two bars of the B section has a chromatically descending sequence - Bm7, Bbm7, Am7, Ab7 (G).

  31. #330

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yes. Although NY must be a depressing place for those of us who aren't Pascale or Rosenwinkel.
    If I lived in NY, I'd probably give up jazz and pursue knitting or something.
    I think that's the wrong mindset. You don't do this shit to make money. You put yourself in the environment anyway you can because you love this music and you want to be around it and learn it and prepared to do whatever you can to hang on in there.

    It's not NYC, but in London I frequently see players that make me reconsider my choice of career... Except... It's GREAT! You know, to be in an inspiring environment. I would play worse if I lived in the sticks. Sorry, but I would.... There's a level. You step up to it. And the young kids coming up... It's not a zero sum game either, it raisies everyone up... My colleagues are all killing it. There's a guy down the road who's toured with Chris Potter. In NYC that would be the guy in your building lol...

    You don't go to NYC unless you are serious, but from what I know, you hang on in there, it's the place to be. Tough for sure... but if you are in a badass environment, you will be a badass,

  32. #331

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    ...on top of all that, the 'pay to play' rule is ridiculous. I was fleeced last time I tried to show off my chops at a 55 Baa session.
    Is the Knitting Factory any better?

  33. #332

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Is the Knitting Factory any better?
    Sadly, it's become a comedy club (although I've heard that some of the yarns they spin there will have you in stitches).

  34. #333
    do they improvise bits from whole cloth?

    edit: i regret posting this
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  35. #334

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    Sorry I should have said baaa-dass

  36. #335
    ewe guys can't just keep ramming sheep puns in here, it's un herd of on a thread such as this.

    4
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  37. #336

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I think that's the wrong mindset. You don't do this shit to make money. You put yourself in the environment anyway you can because you love this music and you want to be around it and learn it and prepared to do whatever you can to hang on in there.

    It's not NYC, but in London I frequently see players that make me reconsider my choice of career... Except... It's GREAT! You know, to be in an inspiring environment. I would play worse if I lived in the sticks. Sorry, but I would.... There's a level. You step up to it. And the young kids coming up... It's not a zero sum game either, it raisies everyone up... My colleagues are all killing it. There's a guy down the road who's toured with Chris Potter. In NYC that would be the guy in your building lol...

    You don't go to NYC unless you are serious, but from what I know, you hang on in there, it's the place to be. Tough for sure... but if you are in a badass environment, you will be a badass,
    Yes, of course, I agree it's the wrong mind set. I'm only kidding. I'm sure there are many great things about being a musician in these cities that attract the worlds best.
    And I'm sure there are times even those big shot players second guess themselves, wonder if they are really as good as people assume they are. So everybody has to try and find a healthy way of dealing with the competitive nature of scene and focus on their own reasons for doing what they are doing.

  38. #337

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yes, of course, I agree it's the wrong mind set. I'm only kidding. I'm sure there are many great things about being a musician in these cities that attract the worlds best.
    And I'm sure there are times even those big shot players second guess themselves, wonder if they are really as good as people assume they are. So everybody has to try and find a healthy way of dealing with the competitive nature of scene and focus on their own reasons doing what they are doing.
    I think extreme bloody mindedness is an underrated quality in the jazz guitarist. Talent is cheap. Insane, unreasoning inability to accept an easier path is rare.

  39. #338

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Yeah people get distracted by his virtuosity and he gets labeled as over technical etc... bummer
    For once, Joe, I'm going to disagree with you (you'll live). I think it sounded too practised. I'm certain it wasn't spontaneous. Also, far too frilly for my ears. I'm not even sure it was jazz...

    I know comparisons are odious but try this, for example.


  40. #339

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    I'm certain it wasn't spontaneous. Also, far too frilly for my ears. I'm not even sure it was jazz...
    Jazz -




  41. #340

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    ewe guys can't just keep ramming sheep puns in here, it's un herd of on a thread such as this.

    4
    The shear awfulness of some of the puns as well....

  42. #341

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I think that's the wrong mindset. You don't do this shit to make money. You put yourself in the environment anyway you can because you love this music and you want to be around it and learn it and prepared to do whatever you can to hang on in there.

    It's not NYC, but in London I frequently see players that make me reconsider my choice of career... Except... It's GREAT! You know, to be in an inspiring environment. I would play worse if I lived in the sticks. Sorry, but I would.... There's a level. You step up to it. And the young kids coming up... It's not a zero sum game either, it raisies everyone up... My colleagues are all killing it. There's a guy down the road who's toured with Chris Potter. In NYC that would be the guy in your building lol...

    You don't go to NYC unless you are serious, but from what I know, you hang on in there, it's the place to be. Tough for sure... but if you are in a badass environment, you will be a badass,

    That's the truth man, I finished my Degree in jazz last summer, and my next stop is masters in NYC, if I don't get in anywhere in NYC, I'll still go to the states and study in another city, the music is happening everywhere.

  43. #342

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    here's some more on half step rules, and a small mention of the chords barry talks about using from the guide tones of a Dominant chord. This sheet was more rushed so sorry if the application examples aren't that great.

  44. #343

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    here's some more on half step rules, and a small mention of the chords barry talks about using from the guide tones of a Dominant chord. This sheet was more rushed so sorry if the application examples aren't that great.

    Thanks!
    Nice summary. The chord found on the 7 of the dominant is often missed when discussing Barry’s stuff. But listening to his recordings, you can hear him outline it more than anything else. And on the tritone it sounds like magic

  45. #344

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamirgal View Post
    Thanks!
    Nice summary. The chord found on the 7 of the dominant is often missed when discussing Barry’s stuff. But listening to his recordings, you can hear him outline it more than anything else. And on the tritone it sounds like magic
    Wot? That's my favourite sound.

    Nice handout ozzy....

  46. #345

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Wot? That's my favourite sound.

    Nice handout ozzy....
    Reading your posts about Barry I’m not surprised I learned allot from you

  47. #346

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamirgal View Post
    Thanks!
    Nice summary. The chord found on the 7 of the dominant is often missed when discussing Barry’s stuff. But listening to his recordings, you can hear him outline it more than anything else. And on the tritone it sounds like magic
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Wot? That's my favourite sound.

    Nice handout ozzy....

    Cheers guys, glad you're liking it. I'll try and do more!

    Ozzy

  48. #347
    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    here's some more on half step rules, and a small mention of the chords barry talks about using from the guide tones of a Dominant chord. This sheet was more rushed so sorry if the application examples aren't that great.
    “But what about the tritone?!” lol
    White belt
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  49. #348

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    “But what about the tritone?!” lol


  50. #349

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    Thanks don, I appreciate it.
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  51. #350

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    There is one aspect of BH harmonizing that I am still struggling to understand. I'm sure it's been covered a dozen times, but I don't seem to find a succinct answer. How does a dominant sound figure into BH harmonizing? I understand that we are not supposed to see "2-5"s, but rather as "movement" of voices leading from one major or minor tonality to another using the dim/6 scales. But given that a lot of music will often lead into a major or minor tonality using a dominant sound, or sit on a dominant sound, or go from dominant to dominant, there must be somewhere BH talks directly about the role of dominants in harmonizing. Isn't there?

    I understand that you can form a min6/dim scale on the "important minor" of a dominant, and that another is to be found built on the b2nd. I can hear how these min6 lead smoothly the same place as the dominant would. But it doesn't sound the same as a dominant chord.

    I can also see that the dim7 chords that fall between the inversions of the 6/min6 chords are just one half step from the V7 chord. Just lower the b6 and you get it. Does BH consider V7 chords to be dim7 with a "borrowed note"?

    In any case, I'm sure we all have our theories. But does anyone have this straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak? Is there a video somewhere where he speaks specifically to dominant chords in his universe of harmony?