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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Still working on chapter one, the basics. I'll be there the rest of the month, maybe into next month.

    I remember saying to Barry at a workshop upon some interesting revelation, "great, now I'm going to have to live until 106."

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  3. #52

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    BTW something that's come to my attention a lot recently are progressions like this:

    Gm7 C7 | Em7b5 A7b9 | Dm

    But these things are everywhere when you start looking for them. They could be seen as an ugly Berkleeoid way of writing this progression, of course:

    C7 | A7(b9) | Dm

    Here are three examples off the top of my head, but there are millions more:

    It Had to Be You
    Limehouse Blues
    East of the Sun

    Now I always used to struggle with these, but the scale up and down to the third of the dominant thing handles this stuff so naturally. So you play C7 up and down to the third of A7b9. (C#)

    Or as I would describe it:

    C7 --> (C#) --> Dm (backdoor into Dm, or interrupted cadence in F)

    Which of course as we see in David B's example is really an extended minor ii-V-I so to speak.
    David has Em7b5 | A7b9 | Dm

    Thsi particular form of the progression I had overlooked really and always played the two II-V's as separate entities which is pretty awkward actually. This approach gives you away of joining them together with almost no effort.

    Now you also have this closely related progression:

    Gm Gm/F | Em7b5 B7b9 | Dm

    Here, we can swap in C7 for Gm, as before, and play the same thing.

    Black Orpheus (RB Changes, I don't think the authentic changes have this)
    Green Dolphin Street (RB Changes, perhaps not the originals)
    The Days of Wine and Roses
    I Thought About You
    etc

    Summary (TL;DR)

    Em7b5 | A7b9 | Dm
    C7 | A7b9 | Dm
    C7 | C#o7 | Dm
    Gm7 C7 | Em7b5 A7b9 | Dm
    Gm Gm/F | Em7b5 A7b9 | Dm

    All can be expressed as the C7 to the third of A7 an then into Dm. All are manifestations of the same thing.

    Obvious to some I'm sure, but again the way progressions are written, voice lead and embellished can make them seem unfamiliar.

    Also for me, something like the minors dominant stuff profits from being approached from lots of different directions. I've spend 20 years thinking m7b5's and dominants are two different things. It takes a lot to intuitively grasp that they are two sides of the same coin.
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-26-2016 at 08:59 AM.

  4. #53

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    BTW am I the only person who feels jazz harmony is basically a form of Algebra?

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    BTW am I the only person who feels jazz harmony is basically a form of Algebra?
    How so?

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Marshall View Post
    How so?
    In the sense that you have axioms, proofs, ways of reducing complicated notation into simpler more elegant forms. You almost have a form of notation you can use as algebra with chord symbols. Almost.

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Here's 20+ minutes of me talking through the progression of 'Indiana'. Unfortunately the camera died whilst I talked through the final four bars of the tune, but they're easy enough to analyse!

    I'm not holding out myself as an expert on any of this material or a strong player. We're all learning this together. In fact, I'd never looked at the tune 'Indiana' before posting that I would do a video, so it forced me to sit down and do some work!

    Good clear video, nice one.

    Now this might seem unbelievably anal, but I say this for good reason. Be specific about enharmony. Ab is not the same thing as G#. Why?

    A lot of people think this stuff isn't important, but (and I don't mean to go full on rain man here ;-)) I think it is. A sharpened note has a different gravity to a flattened one.

    In general, the function of a sharpened note in diatonic harmony is as a leading tone a temporary major 7th, syllable TI of a temporary tonal centre, often the root of a chord within the key.

    A flattened note on the other is usually functioning as a temporary 4th, the syllable FA - resolving down to the 3rd of another chord.

    (In Kodaly signs TI points up, while FA points down, incidentally, to show these natural tendencies)

    Official Barry Harris Thread-kodalyhand-rows-png

    So - for example,

    C G7 G#o7 Am - we are turning the G# into a temporary 7th (leading note) of Am.
    C C7 F - the Bb is the temporary 4th of F, resolving into the 3rd (A) of the F

    These aren't quite true modulations - in the Partimento book Sanguinetti describes these as scale mutations, a term that I like. (18th century musicians used MI not TI for notes resolving up a semitone, incidentally.)

    This is as true of bop as it is of Mozart, so I think being a bit classical about it is appropriate. As Barry himself says 'the harmony is classical.' Everything Barry Harris is talking about here can be found in the music of Mozart and Bach.

    Now in jazz you can do some clever stuff with enharmony - for example, respelling G# as Ab on an E7 chord in the key of C can allow to use F melodic minor, for example, but it's good to know the basic rules IMO.
    Attached Images Attached Images Official Barry Harris Thread-images-png 
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-26-2016 at 10:24 AM.

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    BTW something that's come to my attention a lot recently are progressions like this:

    Gm7 C7 | Em7b5 A7b9 | Dm

    But these things are everywhere when you start looking for them. They could be seen as an ugly Berkleeoid way of writing this progression, of course:

    C7 | A7(b9) | Dm

    Here are three examples off the top of my head, but there are millions more:

    It Had to Be You
    Limehouse Blues
    East of the Sun

    Now I always used to struggle with these, but the scale up and down to the third of the dominant thing handles this stuff so naturally. So you play C7 up and down to the third of A7b9. (C#)



    All can be expressed as the C7 to the third of A7 an then into Dm. All are manifestations of the same thing.

    Obvious to some I'm sure, but again the way progressions are written, voice lead and embellished can make them seem unfamiliar.

    .
    It certainly wasn't obvious to me. I'm getting there. Happens that "It Had To Be You" is a tune I'm working on, so now I have something new to practice there! ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Now this might seem unbelievably anal, but I say this for good reason. Be specific about enharmony. Ab is not the same thing as G#. Why?

    A lot of people think this stuff isn't important, but (and I don't mean to go full on rain man here ;-)) I think it is. A sharpened note has a different gravity to a flattened one.
    This makes sense to me. "It depends on where you are going" (whether a note is a G# or an Ab).
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #59

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    Great thread!
    I bought the Roni Ben Hur Masterclasses at Mikes Masterclasses a long time ago, which show the exact same thing with How high the moon and Confirmation. But I never understood how to make music with this exercise. Or is it just a way to say "play C-mixolydian (= E-locrian) for the Em7b5 and change only the C to C# for the A7 (which would be D harmonic minor I suppose)"?
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Great thread!
    I bought the Roni Ben Hur Masterclasses at Mikes Masterclasses a long time ago, which show the exact same thing with How high the moon and Confirmation. But I never understood how to make music with this exercise. Or is it just a way to say "play C-mixolydian (= E-locrian) for the Em7b5 and change only the C to C# for the A7 (which would be D harmonic minor I suppose)"?
    The point of it as far as I can see is that you can use all your dominant scale language to handle minor ii-V's also. You can also use them for diminished chords and stuff too.

    (As Groynaid points out on another thread you can ALSO use dominants on minor, so that's four uses for one bunch of material.)

    Minimum language, maximum application, always.

    The Barry Harris school is an approach based mostly on the study of the dominant scale (as David B points out.)

    (The flip side of the same coin might be Pat Martino's approach which is about playing minor on dominants and half dims etc. Same logic, different perspective.)
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-26-2016 at 01:33 PM.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post

    The Barry Harris school is an approach based mostly on the study of the dominant scale (as David B points out.)

    (The flip side of the same coin might be Pat Martino's approach which is about playing minor on dominants and half dims etc. Same logic, different perspective.)
    I wonder if it has anything to do with the instruments they play. The minor lines Pat favors (-at least in "Linear Expressions") lay out nicely on the guitar and are easy to move around.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I wonder if it has anything to do with the instruments they play. The minor lines Pat favors (-at least in "Linear Expressions") lay out nicely on the guitar and are easy to move around.
    Probably. Even though I use the BH system conceptually, I still feel a lot of what I am doing is based on minor shapes still.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    The point of it as far as I can see is that you can use all your dominant scale language to handle minor ii-V's also. You can also use them for diminished chords and stuff too.

    (As Groynaid points out on another thread you can ALSO use dominants on minor, so that's four uses for one bunch of material.)

    Minimum language, maximum application, always.

    The Barry Harris school is an approach based mostly on the study of the dominant scale (as David B points out.)

    (The flip side of the same coin might be Pat Martino's approach which is about playing minor on dominants and half dims etc. Same logic, different perspective.)
    Ok, so it's a lot like Sheryl Baileys Family of Four (+1), am I right? In terms of using dominant language on minor7, dominant7, alt7, m7b5 and major7 chords?!? But I still don't see the application of the exercise...
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Ok, so it's a lot like Sheryl Baileys Family of Four (+1), am I right? In terms of using dominant language on minor7, dominant7, alt7, m7b5 and major7 chords?!? But I still don't see the application of the exercise...
    That's kind of backwards. The family of four is one you can do to a dominant chord to play something cool. It's kind of the same relationship but in our case we don't deal with the major chord.

    So - Sheryl

    G7 --> G7 Bm7b5 Dm7 Fmaj7

    (This is like one of a large plethora of different possibilities BTW. Even with this we have options on adding things like Lower Neighbours, using Pivots and so on. There's also no reason why we have to use four note chords.)

    What I am saying is kind of the opposite.

    Bm7b5 Dm7 (or Dm6) G7 can all be expressed by language belonging to the G dominant domain.

    E7b9 can be handled by a small alteration of the G dominant domain - you raise G to G#. This also gives you G#o7.

    - Now say you are the kind of person who has collected a bunch of licks on dominant chords from your favourite players. You can now go to work applying one lick on every chord progression you know.
    - Or you might have derived all those lines from running Barry style patterns from scales. Do the same.
    - Or both (it's important to know how licks are constructed but it doesn't matter for this purpose.)

    So let's take the Fmaj7 on the family of four purely for illustration - I'm only doing this because it's easy for me to write down. Here's one of my favourite motifs based on Fmaj7, especially with the A C E transposed down an octave or pivoted so that the first note is the highest:

    G F# F A C E

    I will call this G7 lick, but harmonically this is far from a simple G7 sound. It's closer to a G13(sus) sound harmonically, but we don't really need to think about that beyond - 'do I like this sound?)

    We'll be using transpositions, so the one in C is the C7 lick:

    C B Bb D F A

    Harmonically kind of a C13(sus) sound... And so on.

    How can we use this arpeggio in tunes? Well, first useful thing is the line doesn't have a G in it except right at the start, so we can ignore the G-G# business. but you can stick a G# in there if you want. So how can we put this arpeggio to work?

    Dm7 G7 C --> G7 lick C
    Bm7b5 E7b9 Am --> G7 lick Am
    Em7b5 A7b9 Dm --> C7 lick Dm
    C C7 F7 F#o7 --> Cmaj7 C7 lick F7 lick F
    C C#o7 Dm7 G7 C --> C C7lick G7lick C
    and so on

    Notice how are licks are on C, F and G or I, IV, V. A guitarist should be able to handle that, right?

    We do need to find some things that can join the chord onto the resolving chord, and you will need to find ways of extending lines to go into two bars, for example. For example for Dm7 G7 | C, G lick into C

    G F# F A C E F D | D# E for example... Notice that I have put the E on the + of 1 to stop the phrase sounding too square. You can put E on the beat by getting rid of the D.

    These are all classics and there are many examples in the music. BTW you could then experiment with other ways altering that maj7 - flatting the 3 is a classic.

    You don't have to be a devotee of the BH approach, but I think it's a very good idea for any jazz musician to get into applying stuff they already know in new contexts. If you think about it, this is no different from the modes. It's just looking at it from a relative rather than a parallel perspective.

    Hope that makes some sort of sense... I'm probably making it sound more complicated than it is.
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-26-2016 at 03:21 PM.

  16. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Ok, so it's a lot like Sheryl Baileys Family of Four (+1), am I right? In terms of using dominant language on minor7, dominant7, alt7, m7b5 and major7 chords?!? But I still don't see the application of the exercise...
    Among other things, it would seem to be a great beginning point for ears and fingers, especially because the focus is on the ONE note which changes in relation to the key of the moment, rather than thinking of an entirely new scale. I would think that the exercise, itself, teaches your ear to hear that abstract idea and make it very concrete.

    I mean, anything works on paper.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 10-26-2016 at 03:10 PM.

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Ok, so it's a lot like Sheryl Baileys Family of Four (+1), am I right? In terms of using dominant language on minor7, dominant7, alt7, m7b5 and major7 chords?!? But I still don't see the application of the exercise...
    I've just had a better idea. Rather than giving you a wall of text, why don't you propose a well known dominant line - a line on a dominant chord, maybe from the bridge of a Parker rhythm changes head or something, and I'll record a short video showing how I would use that material in different ways using this concept?

  18. #67

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    [IMG]file:///page8image128[/IMG]
    Thanks for the offer. How about the last two bars on this page?
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    [IMG]file:///page8image128[/IMG]
    Thanks for the offer. How about the last two bars on this page?
    Can't seem to see it.

  20. #69

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    Official Barry Harris Thread-image-gif

    Now?
    Last edited by phil79; 10-26-2016 at 04:41 PM.
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  21. #70

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    Second attempt worked for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Official Barry Harris Thread-image-gif

    Now?
    That's good now

  23. #72

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    I've edited it. It should work now...
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  24. #73

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    perfect
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  25. #74

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    I'll make the vid tomorrow morning. It's a good line; it sounds to me like that second bar also works very nicely on C7.

    TBH I would probably chop it up into two phrases to make it a little easier to use.

  26. #75

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    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk: A Real POS

  27. #76

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    Phil79, I'll leave it in Christian's capable hands to break down this line into smaller phrases on video but let me add a couple of observations.

    As a whole, I hear it more as F major-based rather than dominant (Ex.1). Parker no doubt fashioned the opening gesture from Jimmy Van Heusen's I Thought About You, a tune that hit the airwaves just as the boppers were coming onto the scene (Ex.2). A common sub for the first bars of I Thought About You is to descend from the ♯IVø7 either chromatically or via the cycle as I've done here to better suit the melody (Ex.3). As it happens, the complete line is a perfect candidate for Christian's initial progression in #53 with a little tweak to include the raised C♯ (Ex.4).

    Official Barry Harris Thread-itay-line-jpg
    Last edited by PMB; 10-26-2016 at 06:34 PM.

  28. #77

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    Official Barry Harris Thread-chord-constellation-jpg

  29. #78

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    Last edited by A. Kingstone; 10-26-2016 at 10:14 PM. Reason: It takes time.

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    Official Barry Harris Thread-chord-constellation-jpg
    Great visual. Haven't fully digested yet but wondering why the E7 has a related fully diminished of Ab instead of G#. I know they are enharmonic but it doesn't seem to follow the structure of the other dominants presented.

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Marshall View Post
    Great visual. Haven't fully digested yet but wondering why the E7 has a related fully diminished of Ab instead of G#. I know they are enharmonic but it doesn't seem to follow the structure of the other dominants presented.

    With apologies to you and Christian I was lazy and young when I put this together. I ignored spelling to my peril in my youth and always thought enharmonics were a given.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    With apologies to you and Christian I was lazy and young when I put this together. I ignored spelling to my peril in my youth and always thought enharmonics were a given.
    I guess I should not be so exact. I just find it easier to visualize when there are patterns. I apologize.

  33. #82

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    I've done the vid but it's really long, so will upload later. Mostly concentrating on the first half.

    The first half resolving on beat 1 of the next bar works on pretty much every chord type. It has no G so I don't need to think about G#.

    Works on
    F, Dm, Bm7b5, G7, Db7alt, E7b9, G#o7

    The ones in bold would normally need a G#.

    But also, Bbmaj7#11 and consequently:

    Bb, Gm, Em7b5, C7, Gb7alt
    And A7b9, C#o7 with the C changed to a C#. (Didn't really touch on these ones in the vid)
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-27-2016 at 07:41 AM.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    Official Barry Harris Thread-chord-constellation-jpg
    I'm going to buy some gel pens and do one of these with sparkly colours.

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I'm going to buy some gel pens and do one of these with sparkly colours.

    That's funny! I was thinking last night that colours might help clarify.

    I did this in the early 90's and the best use it came to was a girlfriend of mine printing it onto mylar and suspending it with springs on a sculpture for her fine arts class at McMaster University.

  36. #85

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    I'm unclear on what Barry means by playing one scale "into" another, such as C7 into A7 (to cover, among other things, Em7b5 A7b9, or just A7.)

    Can anyone clarify that for me?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I'm unclear on what Barry means by playing one scale "into" another, such as C7 into A7 (to cover, among other things, Em7b5 A7b9, or just A7.)

    Can anyone clarify that for me?
    Isn't that the thing with the C#? Say:

    C B Bb A G F E D | C#

    For example?

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Isn't that the thing with the C#? Say:

    C B Bb A G F E D | C#

    For example?
    Well there is that. As in, "Play C7 up and down to the third of A." But then what? There doesn't seem much to practice there....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Well there is that. As in, "Play C7 up and down to the third of A." But then what? There doesn't seem much to practice there....
    *Sibelius file underway, standby*

  40. #89

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    I've known Barry Harris since 1976, and was in the 'kid' house group at the much-missed JCT around '85. I never could get into some of the 'numerical' stuff---my brain being put together in a wholly different way---but have learned much from the man about music and being a man nonetheless. Tuesday night at his class he spent a good 15 minutes on me alone---jamming on Out Of Nowhere. He soloed while I comped bass lines, then joined in in a sort of counterpoint. Before that when I hit the open strings to tune it reminded him of Debussy's Reverie, and he went off on a long lecture-demo on the song (also the singers' project that evening).

    We used to have great times back in the day with his big band. Audrey Chakere (then Blandings) would sing Wave and other tunes and sit in very well on piano. She and Barry would make up hilarious lyrics on a slow blues. Barry's charts and singing are from the heart. I learned his tune Nascimento on that gig, and should play it again in tribute to the man and all he stands for. I also got to gig or at least perform or rehearse with Clifford Jordan, Vernel Fournier, Jaki Byard, Woody Shaw and others there. He really allowed me to 'meet the world.

    What you guys may not know about is all the things he has done for musicians in this oft-brutal town. I'll get into that on another thread if anyone cares to know. Meanwhile, I did a series of podcast interviews with blogger CJ Shearn that will be available online shortly. I keep forgetting the name of the site, but it has 'jazz' in the title---duuuuhhh. But he let me speak at length about Barry, Tommy Turrentine, Clarence 'C.' Sharpe, Jaki Byard and Bill Finegan---all very special people in my life. At the end I played Only Trust Your Heart---because that's what they did...
    Last edited by fasstrack; 10-27-2016 at 10:32 AM.

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Well there is that. As in, "Play C7 up and down to the third of A." But then what? There doesn't seem much to practice there....

    Mark.

    Have a look at the Diminished examples I linked above.

  42. #91

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    Right this is really a simple entry level way to practice this. We start with scales, resolve into a Dm chord tone. We use either stepwise or thirdwise movement through the scale.

    Each step is a small modification of the last.

    Official Barry Harris Thread-playing-c7-into-a7-jpg

    It's fun to practice this way.

    There are vastly more options available if you need them :-)

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I've done the vid but it's really long, so will upload later. Mostly concentrating on the first half.

    The first half resolving on beat 1 of the next bar works on pretty much every chord type. It has no G so I don't need to think about G#.

    Works on
    F, Dm, Bm7b5, G7, Db7alt, E7b9, G#o7

    The ones in bold would normally need a G#.

    But also, Bbmaj7#11 and consequently:

    Bb, Gm, Em7b5, C7, Gb7alt
    And A7b9, C#o7 with the C changed to a C#. (Didn't really touch on these ones in the vid)
    Thanks Christian, I really appreciate your effort...

    About the Family of 4: Sheryl suggests to play lets say the C7 family (C7 bebop scale+Gm7,Em7b5,Bbmaj7 arpeggios) over each of the chords.
    For example over Just Friends:
    2 bars Bbmaj7 - C7 family
    Bb-7 I Eb7 I - Eb7 family
    2 bars Fmaj7 - G7 family
    ....
    So I think the principle to play dom7 language is the same. Maybe only the language is different...
    "I tried practicing for a few weeks and ended up playing too fast." - Paul Desmond

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by phil79 View Post
    Thanks Christian, I really appreciate your effort...

    About the Family of 4: Sheryl suggests to play lets say the C7 family (C7 bebop scale+Gm7,Em7b5,Bbmaj7 arpeggios) over each of the chords.
    For example over Just Friends:
    2 bars Bbmaj7 - C7 family
    Bb-7 I Eb7 I - Eb7 family
    2 bars Fmaj7 - G7 family
    ....
    So I think the principle to play dom7 language is the same. Maybe only the language is different...
    Yes I think so. These different schools are not clashing, but rather viewing the same stuff from different perspectives.

    Where people get confused with Barry's system is when they think that reducing a ii-V down to V means that you must only a V7 arpeggio or something, when in fact you have the V7 dominant scale, all its diminished symmetry friends and about a million ways of coming up with lines that sound like actual bebop from the basic dominant/mixolydian mode.

    1) scalar lines with added notes where rhythmically appropriate
    2) intervallic patterns - thirds, triads, four note, five note chords etc starting on different notes of the scale including the four important chord tones (1, 3, 5, b7)
    3) intervallic patterns with lower neighbours (such as the first bar of your line - we would call it chord played from the seventh of the G7 with a lower neighbour on the upbeat. We wouldn't necessarily think about it being an Fmaj7 here.)
    4) pivots - i.e. transposing some notes an octave up or down to create a more interesting melodic contour.

    (I'm sure there's loads more on the DVDs, but just those 4 points have kept me in material to practice for around 18 months.)

    I used to have a different way of looking at bebop myself, until I realised that my ideas fit rather neatly into the Empire of Barry. The same can be said of Sheryl's material and David Baker's bebop scales.

    Anyway, I must look over the How to Play Bebop Books again, because Baker does discuss the minor's dominant stuff we are talking about here. A different perspective might be useful.

    EDIT: It's in volume II, chapter 4. Although the theoretical background is discussed right at the start where Baker points out that C dominant works over G minor and Em7b5.
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-27-2016 at 12:33 PM.

  45. #94

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    Video ready



    OK, so I got around 40 minutes of stuff just messing around with this one line. I could easily have done 2 hours of video on that line alone I reckon. :-)

    It;s amazing what you can get out of a small amount of material.

  46. #95
    Nice video,, Christian. Thanks.

  47. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Still working on chapter one, the basics. I'll be there the rest of the month, maybe into next month.
    Be like Barry and take your time!


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  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Right this is really a simple entry level way to practice this. We start with scales, resolve into a Dm chord tone. We use either stepwise or thirdwise movement through the scale.

    Each step is a small modification of the last.



    It's fun to practice this way.

    There are vastly more options available if you need them :-)
    Thanks, Christian! That's helpful.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Good clear video, nice one.

    Now this might seem unbelievably anal, but I say this for good reason. Be specific about enharmony. Ab is not the same thing as G#. Why?
    Thanks for checking out the video.

    Yes, I do tend to be a bit loose when it comes to enharmonics. Must get my head around them!

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  50. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Be like Barry and take your time!


  51. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Thanks for checking out the video.

    Yes, I do tend to be a bit loose when it comes to enharmonics. Must get my head around them!
    I just think of how the note functions. In E major or E dominant, would you name the note on the 4th fret of an e string g sharp or a flat? G sharp, the major 3rd. You would never call it a flat 4th.

    In E flat major or E flat dominant, you would name the 4th fret of an e string? A flat, the perfect 4th. You would never call it a sharp 3rd.