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  1. #1

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    Hello guys! i got this idea of playing phrases that are part of the typical bebop language , sharing 'em in this thread , or maybe just suggest transcription material of little phrases , devices etc that are essential clichés of the bebop language !
    What do you think ?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Well, this is a great idea of course, and it is something I wondered about many years ago when seeking out this elusive "language" of Jazz... I think I was expecting to find something like a lexicon of the top 100 phrases, licks, lines, runs, patterns etc... But I kept running into suggestions like: "Go to the records, it's all there..... learn all the Bird heads, it's all there.... get the 3 volumes of How to Play Bebop by David Baker, it's all there....."

    After years of searching, I think we all end up realising that there is no one source that serves to provide us with all the material we seek. And I trawled through a dozen Jazz Lines books before I realised that every one of the Greats rolled their own lines, sometimes based on some older lines, sometimes not so much. This is actually a good thing, it makes for such diversity that we can listen to different players forever without finding everything overly predictable. I just wish I had realised it in the beginning, I mean, when I was a kid bugging out on Kind Of Blue (which I still do!), the way all the players were speaking the same language but with very different stylings was the clue I should have picked up on. Listen to what Trane has in common with Cannon, or even Miles with Bill Evans.

    Whether it's phrasing, note choices or ways to embellish target tones. There's essentially only a small number of common "mini lines" (the bebop lick, the honeysuckle lick, ways to approach or encircle chord tones etc etc). Beyond that is the hard bit - what to do with them! Linking Jazz words to make great Jazz sentences into great paragraphs and full stories requires years of shedding those little ideas all over the neck in all kinds of contexts using your own unique approach and imagination.

    So before people start sharing tips for what material to start shedding, I caution the newcomer to be very careful about choosing their weapons. I spent a year trying to improvise using certain lines I learned from the David Baker books, only to realise I didn't really like them! I eventually turned them into something I did like, but I would have been better off stealing "words" from my favourite players, and learning to speak Jazz with these words. I just can't imagine that any great, or even "good" players developed their craft from collecting hundreds of lines from books. I'm pretty sure they get further by stealing a few ideas from their fave players, getting inside the DNA of these ideas, and then developing their own.

    That said, in the early days, there is still much to be learned from analysing what makes the old cliches tick. So, yeah, let's see what the good folk of this forum bring to the table on this one !

  4. #3

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    one of my favorite things for this are the little 5-4-3-2 phrases Barry Harris teaches. They're like little tiles you can put together in endless ways
    White belt
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  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    one of my favorite things for this are the little 5-4-3-2 phrases Barry Harris teaches. They're like little tiles you can put together in endless ways
    Can you please share an example , that sounds very interresting !

  6. #5

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    Nothing more bebop then starting a phrase with the syncopated upbeat sliding into an 8th note triplet of chord tones (135, 357, 57R, 7R3) So target in each note of the chord from a half step below with a syncopated eighth note that becomes an eighth note triplet .
    Navdeep Singh.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Nothing more bebop then starting a phrase with the syncopated upbeat sliding into an 8th note triplet of chord tones (135, 357, 57R, 7R3) So target in each note of the chord from a half step below with a syncopated eighth note that becomes an eighth note triplet .
    Yeaah i get what you say , especialy on the II , at least that's how i do it , semi tone lower syncoped to 8th and an arpegios , can be continued with a chromatic leading to the 3rd of the V !
    but a video would help a great deal bro if you can do that for the thread would be very awesome ! just to make sure we get it !

  8. #7

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    sure man, here are the ones that I have worked into my bones for a dominant 7 chord:

    so "5" starts on the 5th degree, down to the 7th (major 7 even though dominant chord, more like a neighboring tone), tonic, 4th, then 3rd. just plain old 8th notes at first. so that's your "5"

    "4" starts on the 4th degree, then down to 2nd, b3, 3rd

    "3" starts on 3rd goes down to 5th, b7th, 2nd

    "2" can just be 2, b7, 7, 1

    so run 5 into 4 into 3 into 2: 5th, down to maj 7th, 1, 4 (into "4 now"), 2, b3, 3 (into "3" now), down to 5, b7, 2nd (into "2" now), b7, 7, 1


    so now just come up with endless combos. use them to start and end scale lines or arpeggios or other licks you know etc. A ton you can do with simple ideas that have been shedded to death.
    White belt
    My Youtube

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    sure man, here are the ones that I have worked into my bones for a dominant 7 chord:

    so "5" starts on the 5th degree, down to the 7th (major 7 even though dominant chord, more like a neighboring tone), tonic, 4th, then 3rd. just plain old 8th notes at first. so that's your "5"

    "4" starts on the 4th degree, then down to 2nd, b3, 3rd

    "3" starts on 3rd goes down to 5th, b7th, 2nd

    "2" can just be 2, b7, 7, 1

    so run 5 into 4 into 3 into 2: 5th, down to maj 7th, 1, 4 (into "4 now"), 2, b3, 3 (into "3" now), down to 5, b7, 2nd (into "2" now), b7, 7, 1


    so now just come up with endless combos. use them to start and end scale lines or arpeggios or other licks you know etc. A ton you can do with simple ideas that have been shedded to death.
    thanks for sharing bro , but i just would like to hear how it sounds before delving into the harmonical content of it , can you share something we can hear ?
    I just would like this thread to be ear oriented the intellectual explanations come after the fact !
    Last edited by mooncef; 09-27-2016 at 11:40 AM.

  10. #9

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    White belt
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  11. #10

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    Can't make videos now, sorry, working 12 hour days but it's not that hard to figure out , honestly.

    The other thing I picked up from Pasquale Grasso , which I'm sure is a Barry Harris thing is for note chromatic runs from each degree of the major key. We know which scale degrees are major and which scale degrees are minor obviously. On the minor scale degrees, just go up or down chromatically

    E.g., 2nd degree of C major is D, which is minor

    D-Eb-E=F and down the same way from F back to D ( chromatically in half steps)


    4th° of C major is F which is major

    'pattern is whole step, half half ascending
    F-G-Ab-A

    descending down from the eight would be slightly different
    A-G-Gb-F

    You can come by and scale degrees and get a whole bunch of combinations of chromatic Four runs. Again, it's a very simple concept once you know your major and minor scale degrees .

    EDIT: Say you are in C major, E is the third scale degree and A is the sixth scale degree, both are minor .

    follow the rule and play a four note ascsending chromatic run first from the E, then from the A. Those eight notes will get you one of the most identifiable Thelonious Monk tunes ever
    Last edited by NSJ; 09-27-2016 at 11:55 AM.
    Navdeep Singh.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    sure man, here are the ones that I have worked into my bones for a dominant 7 chord:

    so "5" starts on the 5th degree, down to the 7th (major 7 even though dominant chord, more like a neighboring tone), tonic, 4th, then 3rd. just plain old 8th notes at first. so that's your "5"

    "4" starts on the 4th degree, then down to 2nd, b3, 3rd

    "3" starts on 3rd goes down to 5th, b7th, 2nd

    "2" can just be 2, b7, 7, 1

    so run 5 into 4 into 3 into 2: 5th, down to maj 7th, 1, 4 (into "4 now"), 2, b3, 3 (into "3" now), down to 5, b7, 2nd (into "2" now), b7, 7, 1


    so now just come up with endless combos. use them to start and end scale lines or arpeggios or other licks you know etc. A ton you can do with simple ideas that have been shedded to death.
    Bro can you give a harmonic contest (chords ) and intervals to play , i still don't get it is this sort of a voice leading guideline ?

  13. #12

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    Yeah the examples above are all over dominant 7th, or ii-V7 since we combine them in bebop often. so, no, it doesn't really have to do with voiceleading-- more like a way to get out of running scales and arpeggios and more toward playing phrases that sound like "language."
    White belt
    My Youtube

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Yeah the examples above are all over dominant 7th, or ii-V7 since we combine them in bebop often. so, no, it doesn't really have to do with voiceleading-- more like a way to get out of running scales and arpeggios and more toward playing phrases that sound like "language."
    Ohh i see i'll try those , i those at first you were talking about cells (as in randy vincent's book)

  15. #14

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    Yeah, it's just basic intervals associated with the major scale that can be made dominant or minor as necessary. There's no need to think about "voice leading" at this level, which is that of lines. If you know the difference between a major seventh in a minor seventh and a major third and the minor third , and going up in either whole steps are half steps from the root, that's pretty much the basics right there. It's just 12 notes at the end of the day .

    The real work is in the phrasing, the accents, using legato as a baseline artculation, reserving staccato for emphasis, Playing loud versus playing soft, Learning how to do ascending and descending slurs, displacing rhythms, syncopating lines . That's what makes Jazz jazz and bebop bebop .
    Navdeep Singh.

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Yeah, it's just basic intervals associated with the major scale that can be made dominant or minor as necessary. There's no need to think about "voice leading" at this level, which is that of lines. If you know the difference between a major seventh in a minor seventh and a major third and the minor third , and going up in either whole steps are half steps from the root, that's pretty much the basics right there. It's just 12 notes at the end of the day .

    The real work is in the phrasing, the accents, using legato as a baseline artculation, reserving staccato for emphasis, Playing loud versus playing soft, Learning how to do ascending and descending slurs, displacing rhythms, syncopating lines . That's what makes Jazz jazz and bebop bebop .
    Yep i get you , voice leading is the glue that makes lines , but hear we are focusing on the bebop phrasing ! i have to try those intervals and see how they mix together !

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    sure man, here are the ones that I have worked into my bones for a dominant 7 chord....
    I think a video demonstrating this would be grand. ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #17

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    I'll see if I can find some time for a quick one. I feel bad I haven't had time to continue with the Mickey Baker videos, but almost all my precious little practice/me time has been going toward this wedding gig (very much non-jazz) I have coming up. This shouldn't take long though; I'll see what I can do
    White belt
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  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    I'll see if I can find some time for a quick one. I feel bad I haven't had time to continue with the Mickey Baker videos, but almost all my precious little practice/me time has been going toward this wedding gig (very much non-jazz) I have coming up. This shouldn't take long though; I'll see what I can do
    Thanks!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  20. #19

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    Here's the complete Barry Harris note sequences , 54321

    5: 5 7 1 11 3 (5 as the highest note)
    4: 11 9 #9 3
    3: 3 5 b7 9
    2: 9 b7 7 1
    1: R 7 b7 9 13 5
    Last edited by NSJ; 09-27-2016 at 03:40 PM.
    Navdeep Singh.

  21. #20

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    The other thing is, if tonal music is a basic V-I cadence, you can always spruce up your V7 lines by mixing and matching basic V7 mixo (scales or arpeggios ) with four (4!) different melodic minor based lines built on

    a half step above the V7 (eg, instead of G7, b9 melodic minor or Ab mm)
    a whole step below the V7 (eg, F7 mm instead of G7)
    a P4 above the V7 (eg, C mm)
    a P5 above the V7 (eg, D mm)

    lots and lots of Chromaticism there. Mix and match to taste. You are basically playing 4 modes of melodic minor at the same time if you mix and match em. So much freedom within a very simple framework to remember it .

    all that is only half the job --what to play.

    Im convinced that It is only precursor to the real beauty of this music --how to play.

    thats what I've been shedding, (and will be foe the next several months, solid ) after putting in copious time on the instrument, the fingerboard, the nuts and bolts of what to play (scales arps intervals chords cadences progressions subs etc).

    Imfeel like ill I'll actually be tenuously ready foe prime time then. And only then.

    What to play is only the beginning .

    thr art lies in how to play it
    Navdeep Singh.

  22. #21

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    the barry harris vids are just gold

    the harmony of the line is not as important as its rhythm - its even more about generating the relevant rhythmical effects than it is about making pretty tunes

    great post! thanks joe

    i'm finding that the bridge of rhythm is a great place to hear this stuff start to happen - so that first vid is right on the money for me right now.

  23. #22

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    Great post Mooncef. Though I'm not sure I get NSJ's post.
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  24. #23

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    Navdeep, where did you learn the "1" phrase? I don't think it's on the DVD? I look forward to trying it out. I'll throw it into the mix if I get to make this vid
    Last edited by joe2758; 09-28-2016 at 09:40 AM.
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  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Here's the complete Barry Harris note sequences , 54321

    5: 5 7 1 11 3 (5 as the highest note)
    4: 11 9 #9 3
    3: 3 5 b7 9
    2: 9 b7 7 1
    1: R 7 b7 9 13 5
    Thanks! That's a handy summary.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Navdeep, where did you learn the "1" phrase? I don't think it's on the DVD? I look forward to trying it out. I'll throw it into the mix if I get to make this vid
    Just talking with a guy who attended one of Barry's seminars here once. He was invited wants to be a guest lecturer at Columbia college here in Chicago. I don't have any of his videos, but one day.

    I played all of them and it made total sense to me . All of it passed the ear test to me .

    I've also met young kids in their 20s here who are really good players who would love nothing more than to go to New York to attend his weekly seminars. That's really cool to hear .

    The guy is pushing 90 man . Let's hope 90 doesn't push back . Complete fucking genius of the highest caliber .

    Edit: I should add that I've studied Barry's materials only vicariously through Alan, Roni and Pasquale. I should really really get those videos and listen to his wisdom first hand. For guitar students, I recommend Alan's book immensely.
    Last edited by NSJ; 09-28-2016 at 10:54 AM.
    Navdeep Singh.

  27. #26
    There was no mention to bud powell and charlie parker so far whilist they are the founders of the Bebop language according to a lot of knowledgeble guys !
    regarding those two , do you think their "heads" encapsulate the essence of the bebop language ? some recommand studying all bird's heads ? what do you think ?

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by mooncef View Post
    There was no mention to bud powell and charlie parker so far whilist they are the founders of the Bebop language according to a lot of knowledgeble guys !
    regarding those two , do you think their "heads" encapsulate the essence of the bebop language ? some recommand studying all bird's heads ? what do you think ?
    Charlie Parker, definitely! There's so much in the heads of his tunes. I keep hearing those little licks from Barry Harris by Parker's music. Bud Powell comes from Parker but I find him a bit different though..


    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpG...ehpkEjhFsr-FZQ

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Here's the complete Barry Harris note sequences , 54321

    5: 5 7 1 11 3 (5 as the highest note)
    4: 11 9 #9 3
    3: 3 5 b7 9
    2: 9 b7 7 1
    1: R 7 b7 9 13 5
    If I rewrite this, displacing things into the right octave, is this correct?

    5: 12 7 8 11 10
    4: 11 9 #9 10
    3: 3 5 b7 9
    2: 9 b7 7 8
    1: 8 7 b7 9 6 5
    Build bridges, not walls.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    If I rewrite this, displacing things into the right octave, is this correct?

    5: 12 7 8 11 10
    4: 11 9 #9 10
    3: 3 5 b7 9
    2: 9 b7 7 8
    1: 8 7 b7 9 6 5
    I don't think there is a wrong answer, you can displace it octave wise wherever you want. I just go we pre-operative baseline instruction that the top note is always the highest note in each sequence, and everything else falls below. Obviously, feel free to change it as you see fit .

    So for the 1 sequence if for example 1 equals C played on the third string 5th fret , The next two notes are just chromatic stepwise movements to B flat, and the D is on the 5th fret, 5th strung. And then the final A and G on the fourth string .

    Feel free to change it however you want, I just think it works more elegantly when the baseline understanding is that the 1st note is highest top note in the sequence .

    Hope that was clear. The trick is always to take something and make it Your own . It's just a bunch of note Sequences .

  31. #30

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    There are some more examples here (although I didn't see the point of the lengthy digression about Turing!)

    https://blog.uvm.edu/tgcleary/2015/0...-is-the-bombe/

  32. #31

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    I Think it's more important to recognize patterns and it is study licks. This is what Mike logo says. If you studied these 5432 patterns, you will see a hallmark trademark of bebop: filling in the whole steps with chromatic movement .

    Eagerly await Ing in the mail forthe two Mike Longo books that I just ordered . Where he teaches you the Dizzy Gillespie Way of creating melodies from rhythms.

    No I'm not sure that the 1 pattern actually was codified. In any event, it makes sense and it sounds good. I'll continue to use it .
    Navdeep Singh.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    There are some more examples here (although I didn't see the point of the lengthy digression about Turing!)

    https://blog.uvm.edu/tgcleary/2015/0...-is-the-bombe/
    Looks like he's trying to draw a comparison between Parker's genius for musical patters, and Turing's for mathematical patterns. I think he's reaching, but whatevs.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Joe View Post
    Looks like he's trying to draw a comparison between Parker's genius for musical patters, and Turing's for mathematical patterns. I think he's reaching, but whatevs.
    I expect Turing could have designed an amazing machine for generating infinite Charlie Parker licks!

  35. #34

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    Maybe Bird went over to Bletchely Park during WW2? Top secret stuff...
    Build bridges, not walls.

  36. #35
    I think this has a wealth of bebop devices !

  37. #36

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    Am7 … …….D7……………...G

    | A C E G | F# Eb C C# | D …… Then perhaps the FIVE PHRASE of Barry's listed above.




    or



    Am7 … …….D7……………...G

    | A B C E | Eb C A A# | B …… Then perhaps the THREE PHRASE of Barry's listed above. (with 7 not b7)
    Last edited by A. Kingstone; 09-28-2016 at 08:16 PM.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by mooncef View Post
    I think this has a wealth of bebop devices !


    Happy Birthday Bud.

    (sorry I'm a day late)

  39. #38

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    I was able to steal a second to try out that "1" phrase while changing my son's diaper, and it does sound good. In terms of octave placement I was doing:

    8,7,b7,9,13,12....I don't think I've ever said "12" for a scale degree in my life haha

    One thing I found interesting is that it ends on the 5th on an upbeat, so running it into some of the other phrases requires a chromatic note or rhythmic variation. Which is good for variety, creativity, and problem solving anyway

    Edit to add: pay close attention to A.Kingstone. he doesn't post a lot, but when he does it's worth noting!
    Last edited by joe2758; 09-29-2016 at 08:25 AM.
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  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    There are some more examples here (although I didn't see the point of the lengthy digression about Turing!)

    https://blog.uvm.edu/tgcleary/2015/0...-is-the-bombe/
    Thanks for that, Graham. Interesting stuff.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    I Think it's more important to recognize patterns and it is study licks.
    I'm reading this as "I think it is more important to recognize patterns than it is to study licks." Right?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    One thing I found interesting is that it ends on the 5th on an upbeat, so running it into some of the other phrases requires a chromatic note or rhythmic variation. Which is good for variety, creativity, and problem solving anyway
    !

    If you think it is one entire bar of 6/8, there is no need to add a chromatic note or anything else, it fits by it self.

    It's just 1-2-3 1-2-3.

    Yep. Eagerly awaiting the Mike Longo books

    "The question must be asked: whose licks were Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie copying ? A pattern and a lick are not the same thing. A pattern is a grouping of notes into a logical sequence, that once the rhythmic embellishment begins, loses its identity, and becomes several different free-flowing melodies. A lick is something that someone else had played and you copied; this is not the result of your sense of rhythm. Dizzy one said to this pianist in Florida, 'find yourself a rhythm and hang some notes on it'. The rhythmic behavior of Dizzys music is, for example, the polymetric conception which includes this simultaneous running of 5/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/4 and other meters primarily responsible for the melodic rhythmic nature you hear in his playing."
    Mike Longo, pianist and musical director for Dizzy Gillespie


    Miles Davis one said that if he was a branch in the tree of jazz, Dizzy was the trunk of the tree.
    Navdeep Singh.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    If you think it is one entire bar of 6/8, there is no need to add a chromatic note or anything else, it fits by it self.

    It's just 1-2-3 1-2-3.
    yeah, wouldn't that fall into the "rhythmic variation" category? Anyway, two triplets would still leave the 5th off beat. One triplet followed by an 8th would line it up with the other phrases better.

    I'm not a "chord tones on the beat" nazi, it's good to experiment, but the BASIC version of these exercises starts 1 on the beat, two on the up beat, 3 on the beat, 4 up beat, 5 on the beat.

    play your "1" phrase into the "5" phrase and you should see what I mean
    White belt
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  44. #43

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    Tried some of those patterns last night, and really liked them. I know what I'll be practicing for a while.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  45. #44

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    Joe-
    did you find groupings of small phrases into one larger phrase helped with your articulation? That's my favorite part; sort of built-in phrasing
    White belt
    My Youtube

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    yeah, wouldn't that fall into the "rhythmic variation" category? Anyway, two triplets would still leave the 5th off beat. One triplet followed by an 8th would line it up with the other phrases better.

    I'm not a "chord tones on the beat" nazi, it's good to experiment, but the BASIC version of these exercises starts 1 on the beat, two on the up beat, 3 on the beat, 4 up beat, 5 on the beat.

    play your "1" phrase into the "5" phrase and you should see what I mean
    ah see it fits if you think of it as quarter note triplets. Which are a pain in the ass to count using the conventional subdividing of rhythms way.

    Understanding Quarter Note Triplets | BANG! The Drum School

    I was working a little bit on Indian rhythms, which are predicated on the opposite concept----- on additive rhythms. I believe that's the concept that Mike Longo emphasizes . This is one of his books that is highly highly recommended by his fellow piano player, Hal Galper.

    "How To Sight Read Jazz and Syncopated Type Rhythms"

    How To Sight Read Jazz and Syncopated Type Rhythms

    "Learn the difference between rhythm as it developed in Africa and the Eastern part of the world, as opposed to our Western concept of rhythm.You learn to subdivide rhythm according to these Eastern principles along with a method for applying this to professional sight reading which enables you to come up with the exact interpretation of even the most "difficult to read" rhythms the very first time you perform them. As you progress through the course you will become acquainted with the traditional practices of jazz notation as it has been evolved by jazz composers and arrangers in the U.S.A. along with with some amazing insights into the unique type of meter which is exclusive to contemporary jazz.




    Later in the course a sight reading technique is presented in which you learn to organize the time on the page in a completely unique fashion that can produce dramatic results in your ability to read and play rhythm at sight. Once you have learned the technique, the course takes you through a daily training program involving 35 reading exercises that are to be practiced daily employing a certain principle explained in the course. You will realize a drastic improvement in your sight reading ability if you apply these principles to this program and then move on to other music later. This can be accomplished in a matter of weeks if this regime is followed daily."

    The other book that I ordered is called "the improvised melodic line".

    "Having the right piece of information about a particular aspect of playing can be of tremendous value to the budding professional. It can literally save you years of trial and error-type experimentation. Why is having the right information so important?


    YOU LEARN: How to use rhythm as a source of melody; How to create melody from a single tone; How to weave lines in and out of chord voicings and the tones involved in a chord progression; How to construct runs to be used as tools to create spontaneous melody; How to use the entire chromatic universe through the use of modes and by employing non-harmonic tone technique; How to negotiate progressions like the II-V pattern spontaneously rather than rely on memorized patterns.


    Not only are you provided with valuable information, but you are shown how to practice to produce results the very next time you perform. In this course the work is mapped out in such a way so as to foster the tendency of creating an original style for yourself. You actually learn the techniques and practice methods of the accomplished musician, enabling you to experience an almost immediate growth as you begin to incorporate them into your playing.


    You will learn how to use a single line of melody to convey the harmony, rhythm, counterpoint and form of an entire piece of music, unnaccompanied. You are provided with exercises which act as catalysts for unlocking certain kinds of rhythmic and tonal behavior in your playing as if by magic."

    r which is exclusive to contemporan the course a sight reading technique is presented in which you learn to organize the time on the page in a completely unique fashion that can produce dramatic results in your ability to read and play rhythm at sight. Once you have learned the technique, the course takes you through a daily training program involving 35 reading exercises that are to be practiced daily employing a certain principle explained in the course. You will realize a drastic improvement in your sight reading ability if you apply these principles to this program and then move on to other music later. This can be accomplished in a matter of weeks if this regime is followed daily.
    Navdeep Singh.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    I Think it's more important to recognize patterns and it is study licks. This is what Mike logo says. If you studied these 5432 patterns, you will see a hallmark trademark of bebop: filling in the whole steps with chromatic movement .

    Eagerly await Ing in the mail forthe two Mike Longo books that I just ordered . Where he teaches you the Dizzy Gillespie Way of creating melodies from rhythms.

    No I'm not sure that the 1 pattern actually was codified. In any event, it makes sense and it sounds good. I'll continue to use it .


    Hi,

    What's the name of these books you ordered by Mike Longo?

    Thanks

    Ken

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    ah see it fits if you think of it as quarter note triplets. Which are a pain in the ass to count using the conventional subdividing of rhythms way.

    .
    Hmm, sorry, if you mean two groups of quarter note triplets, then I still can't agree. Again, one set of quarter note triplets followed by 8th notes would get you lined up. Rhythm is super fun to experiment with-- just wanted to make sure anyone learning these things from this thread arn't starting of with lopsided phrases-- they can take it in that direction later
    Last edited by joe2758; 09-29-2016 at 10:37 AM.
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  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    I was able to steal a second to try out that "1" phrase while changing my son's diaper
    There are some good guitar-cleaning products on the market nowadays.

  50. #49

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    gotta make time my friend! most of my practice these days is one handed while mowing the lawn, showering, driving, brushing my teeth etc
    White belt
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  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Joe-
    did you find groupings of small phrases into one larger phrase helped with your articulation? That's my favorite part; sort of built-in phrasing
    I did a little bit. I didn't really have much time to mess around with it. Sounded good though.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg