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  1. #1

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    How did you guys internalize the technical side of playing changes? I've got plenty of chops, but I'm finding it difficult to play and think through chord changes simultaneously. It really has become a wall that I can't surpass. My goal is to be able to play lines of eight eighths to a bar without interruption. Could anybody suggest a method or a more effective practice routine?

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  3. #2

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    Good question. This, imo, is one of the toughest parts of jazz guitar. Some guys accomplish it by playing a bunch of regurgitated licks, scales, and arpeggios.

    I think this is a step in our development, but isn't true improvisation. Being able to play what we hear in real time, in swinging 8ths is a life time challenge.

    I study with Tony DeCaprio, one of the top players/educators in the jazz world. He has a method that develops this very thing. It is no shortcut, but you won't get sidetracked by other stuff.

    Tony writes a regular column for Just Jazz Guitar that deals with improvisation, has a book that deals with this topic, and has a couple of levels of teaching depending on your budget and aspirations.

    tonydecaprio.com He is in the middle of a move, so he is in and out online. Good luck however you choose to pursue this.

  4. #3

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    I agree totally. Jazz improvisation to me is not a regurgitation of licks, but a navigation of the harmony. I love David Torn, I've got a lot of Miles Davis albums and I know there are more approaches to soloing, but I really want to get that bop chord approach down.Thanks for the link, looks like a lot of heavy stuff in there. Anyone else?

  5. #4

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    start by trying to play quarter notes over the bar and keep it swingin. chops will only get you so far-- once you can feel it, it'll be easier to kick it up to eights.

    personally, i think running eighths should be used sparingly.

  6. #5

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    One of my old teachers show me that if you can play straight 8ths through a chorus or two, outlining the changes, you can pretty blow on a tune doing many things you want, including not playing 8ths.
    Unless you're a sequencer, nobody would play endless eights anyway, (although in jazz there guys overdoing that). By practicing in this manner, you build confidence in note choices and rhythmic control over the changes.
    I find that writing out one or two choruses, using one of the concepts I'm working on, really help. I would use nothing but straight 8ths.

  7. #6

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    I agbree with tung. this is a good way to hear the changes. when you play you should hear the changes. then react to the changes--not bow to them--oh mighty II-V-I, we bow to thee. make melodies.

  8. #7
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    How did you guys internalize the technical side of playing changes? I've got plenty of chops, but I'm finding it difficult to play and think through chord changes simultaneously. It really has become a wall that I can't surpass. My goal is to be able to play lines of eight eighths to a bar without interruption. Could anybody suggest a method or a more effective practice routine?
    Could the answer be simple?

    I tend to break up chords into groups of 2 or 3, and ask, "what key contains those chords"? Hence all the modes of that scale are available, as well as the (overlapping) notes of the arpeggio of each chord. Guaranteed to harmonize quite nicely :}

    ALways be on the lookout for hidden cliched progressions. Go thru the Real Book and you'll see many a well disguised ii V7, I vi ii V7 etc etc. Oh they always pull off some kind of chord substitution to mask the cliche.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by flankman
    I agbree with tung. this is a good way to hear the changes. when you play you should hear the changes. then react to the changes--not bow to them--oh mighty II-V-I, we bow to thee. make melodies.
    That's good. But very true. We have to be master of the changes, not slave to them, make melodies that are meaningful is difficult, a lifetime pursuit for sure, rather than running the changes.
    That's why i dig Ed Bickert solos, he never sounds like he's running the chords, it always sounds like he making melodies over the changes. Now a guy like Jimmy Bruno, who is a great technician, but I don't get as much emotional response to what he does, it sounds like he's running the changes most of the time.

  10. #9
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Tung
    That's good. But very true. We have to be master of the changes, not slave to them, make melodies that are meaningful is difficult, a lifetime pursuit for sure, rather than running the changes.
    That's why i dig Ed Bickert solos, he never sounds like he's running the chords, it always sounds like he making melodies over the changes. Now a guy like Jimmy Bruno, who is a great technician, but I don't get as much emotional response to what he does, it sounds like he's running the changes most of the time.

    Oh Tung, ever heard Bruno's "Like That" with Joey DeFrancesco? You might change your tune.

    Bruno is not just fast, he's very melodic and can swing like a mofo. Nice chord melody too. Octaves? Fogetaboutit. He's great.

    "Like That", a most excellent CD, with a few Wes tunes to boot.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzarian
    Oh Tung, ever heard Bruno's "Like That" with Joey DeFrancesco? You might change your tune.

    Bruno is not just fast, he's very melodic and can swing like a mofo. Nice chord melody too. Octaves? Fogetaboutit. He's great.

    "Like That", a most excellent CD, with a few Wes tunes to boot.
    I'll check it out and let you know. This is in no way a diss on Bruno. I'm just saying from what I've heard, I just don't get the chills like hearing Metheny, old Benson, Rosenwinkel etc..It's a personal taste. But I'm always open to check out what you guys recommend.

  12. #11
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Tung
    I'll check it out and let you know. This is in no way a diss on Bruno. I'm just saying from what I've heard, I just don't get the chills like hearing Metheny, old Benson, Rosenwinkel etc..It's a personal taste. But I'm always open to check out what you guys recommend.

    If you like the aforementioned, you'd like "Like That". Trust me.

    Some nice photos of his 7 string Benedetto on the cover too. I've never heard a better jazz guitar tone than that particular Benedetto.

    Bruno and DeFrancesco have a way with standards. I'd like to see them pair up again.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzarian
    Could the answer be simple?

    I tend to break up chords into groups of 2 or 3, and ask, "what key contains those chords"? Hence all the modes of that scale are available, as well as the (overlapping) notes of the arpeggio of each chord. Guaranteed to harmonize quite nicely :}

    ALways be on the lookout for hidden cliched progressions. Go thru the Real Book and you'll see many a well disguised ii V7, I vi ii V7 etc etc. Oh they always pull off some kind of chord substitution to mask the cliche.
    That sounds intriguing, but I'm not sure I follow. When you say groups of two or three, you mean what, chords that serve a tonic/(pre)dominant function?

  14. #13
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    That sounds intriguing, but I'm not sure I follow. When you say groups of two or three, you mean what, chords that serve a tonic/(pre)dominant function?
    Nope!

    Don't look at the chords with any kind of predisposition!

    Let's say we had:

    FMaj7 G7 | GMaj7 A7 | CMaj7 Dmi7 G7

    Translation:

    Key C Maj |Key D Maj |Key C Maj

    Typically the Dom 7ths give the key away! You see an A7, you know its DMajor. Major 7ths can either be the "tonic" or "subdominant". The minor 7ths can be the ii, iii, or vi of the major scale. So with the major or minor 7ths, you have to look for other clues to resolve the key ambiguity.
    Last edited by Jazzarian; 12-08-2007 at 01:32 PM.

  15. #14

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    So what you're saying is, once you've identified the connotation of the keys you can just use their respective major scales to play lines?

  16. #15
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    So what you're saying is, once you've identified the connotation of the keys you can just use their respective major scales to play lines?
    Or the modes from those scales, or the arpeggios of the chords.


    Larry Carlton likes to play mixolydian over the tonic, for instance. Yep, he might play a G Mixolydian over a C Major 7th chord (key of C Major). Modes a 3d or 5th away tend to harmonize well.

    The important thing is to get your bearings. What I described, relating chords to their major key is a pragmatic way to do just that. In jazz, key changes often occur from measure to measure. This is why it is so important to pick up clues from chords chopped up into groups of 2 to 3.
    Last edited by Jazzarian; 12-08-2007 at 02:35 PM.

  17. #16

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    You know, I'd never thought ofthings that way before. What a cool idea!

    I've been following Mr. beaumont's advice (ie, arpeggiating the chord in quarters and isolating specific beats to approach or leave with an eighth note), which has really helped with the technical and "feel" aspect of the task. Coupled with your suggestions here, I've been finding that running these types of lines in real time has become a lot easier.

    Obviously, I don't intend to make this a staple of my soloing style. It doesn't take a genius to spot that a constant stream of notes can sound tasteless, but it's reassuring to know that you can. I don't think I'll feel like a real guitarist til I'm as confident as can be that I can play changes.

  18. #17

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    [quote=Jazzarian;4120]


    Larry Carlton likes to play mixolydian over the tonic, for instance. Yep, he might play a G Mixolydian over a C Major 7th chord (key of C Major). quote]


    this is why modal thinking bothers me sometimes...

    C major scale: C D E F G A B

    G mixolydian: G A B C D E F

    why overcomplicate the same thing by calling it another name-- it's all C major...

    now, try a C lydian over a C maj 7 and dig that raised 11th sound...that's when modes can be useful.

  19. #18

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    That's right Mr. Beaumont. All scales (modes) should be some type of lydian (lydian b3; lydian b7; etc). They are great for your vocabulary, but I don't play that way. I've leaned to hear melodies that work over changes. I practice everything in the circle order. C is the 5th of F,etc. Lydian presents you with the half octave often mislabled the tritone. I also don't like things called different names mi7b5 (correct) half diminished (wrong) same formula 1-b3-b5-b7. This is natural to life--we don't call the same person by different names. Art communicates. Whew!! Out of breath.

  20. #19
    Jazzarian Guest
    [quote=mr. beaumont;4132]
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzarian


    Larry Carlton likes to play mixolydian over the tonic, for instance. Yep, he might play a G Mixolydian over a C Major 7th chord (key of C Major). quote]


    this is why modal thinking bothers me sometimes...

    C major scale: C D E F G A B

    G mixolydian: G A B C D E F

    why overcomplicate the same thing by calling it another name-- it's all C major...

    now, try a C lydian over a C maj 7 and dig that raised 11th sound...that's when modes can be useful.

    I have no problems with modal thinking, and have been thinking that way since I was 15. Modes sound entirely different from their parent key. Modes help with ensuring harmony, or just the opposite, if desired.

    Typically I tend to think in terms of scale fragments and arpeggios when soloing.

    C Lydian belongs to the key of G. So does the C Major 7th chord. I think most people would be thinking either C Ionian or C Lydian as choices for scales over such.

  21. #20

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    there's nothing inherently wrong with modal thinking-- my point was that we can say all day that larry carlton plays a G mixolydian over a c major chord, but unless he plays the notes in order who's gonna hear mixolydian? it's all C major...

    the lydian sound over the I maj is a very hip sound, and while it does require altering the chord, many players are cool with this change.

  22. #21

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    Yeah, that's a nice one. I snagged that one offa John Abercrombie when I first started listening to him... Basically any mode is a hip substitute for another so long as it contains the chord details.

  23. #22
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    there's nothing inherently wrong with modal thinking-- my point was that we can say all day that larry carlton plays a G mixolydian over a c major chord, but unless he plays the notes in order who's gonna hear mixolydian? it's all C major...

    the lydian sound over the I maj is a very hip sound, and while it does require altering the chord, many players are cool with this change.
    One tends to hear a harmony of sorts in 5ths when playing a mixolydian over the tonic. That's the point, the initial displacement.

    In terms of Lydian over the tonic, that's like the "pivot chord" concept. How do the keys of C and G overlap? Certainly they have the C Maj7 in common. Thus it is perfect for a modulation. Same is true for Ionian/Lydian.
    The difference being the F vs F#. Certainly F ->F# makes for a nice grace note, and the modulation is complete :}

  24. #23
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    there's nothing inherently wrong with modal thinking-- but unless he plays the notes in order who's gonna hear mixolydian? it's all C major...

    You do realize what you espouse is the antithesis of Miles Davis in the 1950s?

  25. #24

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    no, it's not. not even close.

    modal jazz was loosely based on the modes, which meant that chord structure went out the window. when miles and company were playing a mode, the accompanyent behind it was based on tonal clusters that contained the notes in the key center, or the mode.

    i often feel that "modal" jazz is a misnomer...the music made during this period alowed for a lot more freedom than a prescribed set of 7 notes at any given time.

    again, the point i'm making is that playing a G mixolydian over a C major 7 is nothing special...am i the only one here who sees that it's a completely the same pool of notes as a C major scale?

  26. #25
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    no, it's not. not even close.

    modal jazz was loosely based on the modes, which meant that chord structure went out the window. when miles and company were playing a mode, the accompanyent behind it was based on tonal clusters that contained the notes in the key center, or the mode.

    i often feel that "modal" jazz is a misnomer...the music made during this period alowed for a lot more freedom than a prescribed set of 7 notes at any given time.

    again, the point i'm making is that playing a G mixolydian over a C major 7 is nothing special...am i the only one here who sees that it's a completely the same pool of notes as a C major scale?
    Of course they're the same notes. Does the relative minor of a given major key sound the same as the major key? Of course not. Nor does the locrian sound much like the Ionian. Yet we're still entirely within the relm of diatonic scales.

    They might be the same notes, the intervals certainly are not the same.

    I don't memorize modes by "1/2 step whole step whole step" etc. I memorize modes as a displacement from the major scale, and by their unique sound.

    Yes indeed, I do think everyone should know the natural modes of major scale. That, long before venturing into the land of the non-diatonic.

  27. #26

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    yes, the intervals are not the same. but are we playing these modes in order everytime we improvise? i'd argue that context is just as important as content.

    true, the A Aeolian sounds a heck of a lot different than a C major scale, I agree. But over a C major it's still the same pool of notes, and it's a safe choice. maybe it's just the way i think, but if somebodywere to tell me they were working a "B locrian lick" over a C major, they'd get an eye roll from me.

    different schools of thought, i guess...i come fom the arpeggio/chord tone school...but in the end, it's all just different roadmaps to the hopefully the same destination-- an interesting melodic line.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont

    i often feel that "modal" jazz is a misnomer...the music made during this period alowed for a lot more freedom than a prescribed set of 7 notes at any given time.

    again, the point i'm making is that playing a G mixolydian over a C major 7 is nothing special...am i the only one here who sees that it's a completely the same pool of notes as a C major scale?
    I have to agree with Mr. Beaumont on this one. I've learned all the names and positions of the modes when i was just learning how to play, when I was about 14. I find that thinking in G mixolydian or whatever is still playing in C major. what works for me is simply to be aware of the chord tones of the chord you're on at the moment, and target the chord tones, thinking in modes never really work for me.

  29. #28

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    Mr Beaumont & I are musically from the the same school of thought. Arpeggios & chord tones usually outline the thought path for my improvisation on most tunes. I have studied modes and harmonizing six ways from Sunday but I don't think fast enough to remember and use all I have learned on the fly so I usually stick to using arpeggios and intervals from the chords. Actually, many of the melodies come from the chord tones (check out "All The Things You Are") and I usually end up with quite a bit of the melody built in to the solo.
    best wishes,
    wizard3739

  30. #29

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    I agree with Mr B and Wizard regarding the role of modes in traditional jazz. Using the "Major" modes over a chord progression produces a decidely scalar sound that blurs the changes.

    Focusing on the chord changes and the leading tones allows the opportunity to apply chomaticisms that preserve the sense of the chord progression. As one becomes more proficient at this approach and the melody, chords and leading tones become internalized, the solos become more intricate and may create an illusion of modal approach but the effect is far more appealing and sounds like you are "playing the changes".

    IMO approaching traditional jazz from a modal perspective makes the solos sound like smooth jazz or fusion at best and a scale exersize at worst. Smooth jazz and fusion are fine I suppose but not my cup of tea.

    As far as Miles Davis goes, he pioneered the application of modal jazz but it was not the same modal concept that is commonly referred to in mainstream instructional material. Miles was actually applying the Lydian Chromatic Concept developed by George Russel, which is quite different and very theoretically dense. I find the concept interesting but I certainly can't apply it to any great effect.

    Quote from George Russel's Website....“Miles Davis became the first major jazz musician to be influenced by Russell’s ideas, and in 1958 he composed...Milestones, which was based on two modes...He recorded Milestones with Coltrane on April 3, 1958, and both men felt liberated by the new harmonic philosophy. Davis continued to work on Russell’s concepts, and...he created five selections for the first all-modal album, Kind of Blue.” Stan Getz: A Life in Jazz by Donald Maggin, William Morrow, New York

  31. #30

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    Yeah to me the whole modal thing is overly conviluted. I take a much simpler approach. When I want a mixo sound, I add a b7 to my major scale.

    When I want a dorian sound, add a major 6 to the natural minor scale. I only think in either major or minor, and just see the modal color tones around those scales. This is a much simpler viewpoint imo. But hey, whatever works.

    I think playing D dorian, G mixolydian and C ionian over a ii V I in C is boring. However, it is a place to start. I let students know of this possibility, but steer them to arpeggios at the beginning.

  32. #31

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    Agreed. I view the modes as a derivative of the major scale (all the time) and use them as a means to an end: achieving a sound that is characteristic of the harmony. I only revert to modal thinking when the chord at hand has a very specific sound (ie, Minor 6/9 chord or some of the more extended dominants). That method really helped to eliminate some of the thinking involved in the chord tone approach once I had internalized the patterns. After all, a scale is essentially a very muddy arpeggio, right?

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    After all, a scale is essentially a very muddy arpeggio, right?
    I like that!

  34. #33
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by derek
    Yeah to me the whole modal thing is overly conviluted. I take a much simpler approach. When I want a mixo sound, I add a b7 to my major scale.

    When I want a dorian sound, add a major 6 to the natural minor scale. I only think in either major or minor, and just see the modal color tones around those scales. This is a much simpler viewpoint imo. But hey, whatever works.

    I think playing D dorian, G mixolydian and C ionian over a ii V I in C is boring. However, it is a place to start. I let students know of this possibility, but steer them to arpeggios at the beginning.

    I couldn't disagree more. Having to remember to add a b7 to a major scale is much more difficult to remember than starting on a different degree of a scale.

    If I want G Mixolydian, I simply start out on G and end on G of a C Major Scale. Ever try remembering "flat whatever to get whatever" on the fly? Sorry, that won't work for most people. Most people will remember the pattern for a major scale that covers 2 octaves however.

  35. #34

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    Hmmm... Approaching modes as members of the same position would explain why you travel by keys as opposed to chords. Clever, that.

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzarian
    I couldn't disagree more. Having to remember to add a b7 to a major scale is much more difficult to remember than starting on a different degree of a scale.

    If I want G Mixolydian, I simply start out on G and end on G of a C Major Scale. Ever try remembering "flat whatever to get whatever" on the fly? Sorry, that won't work for most people. Most people will remember the pattern for a major scale that covers 2 octaves however.

    Yes, I do remember to flat whatever on the fly. Don't you do this when playing in various keys, or utilizing subs? Perhaps I am missing what you are saying.

    I am aware of each tone in the major scale I am playing, so playing a b7, or a #4/#11 is no big deal in my mind. I have gotten a lot of mileage out of this in teaching, but again, whatever works.

    There is more than one (or two) ways to skin a mode. I just don't hear mixo as well when I am playing C major starting and ending on G.

  37. #36
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by derek
    Yes, I do remember to flat whatever on the fly. Don't you do this when playing in various keys, or utilizing subs? Perhaps I am missing what you are saying.

    I am aware of each tone in the major scale I am playing, so playing a b7, or a #4/#11 is no big deal in my mind. I have gotten a lot of mileage out of this in teaching, but again, whatever works.

    There is more than one (or two) ways to skin a mode. I just don't hear mixo as well when I am playing C major starting and ending on G.
    No I don't think of naming each note as I play. I doubt I could crank out my 20 notes/second if I thought of each note's name and degree of the scale prior to playing it. Not with 50 milliseconds per note.

    Not only that, such thoughts would absolutely kill my creativity.

    Certainly I do my research first, tell myself which scales/modes/arpeggios are available over which chords, and that's about the end of my thoughts.

    What little thinking I do tends to be in scale fragments afterwards.

  38. #37
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    Hmmm... Approaching modes as members of the same position would explain why you travel by keys as opposed to chords. Clever, that.
    By position, if you mean displacement from the start of the corresponding major scale, that is indeed correct.

    Sometimes though, you need a new hand position for covering 2 octaves worth of mode.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzarian
    By position, if you mean displacement from the start of the corresponding major scale, that is indeed correct.

    Sometimes though, you need a new hand position for covering 2 octaves worth of mode.
    Understood. A neat concept, real economy of motion. I lean towards the chord tone approach myself, but more because I find it more difficult to get the phrasings I use for my scales Jazzy. When I play modally, it just sounds like exercises to me. Then again, I listen to John Scofield for an hour and can't help but wonder...

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    After all, a scale is essentially a very muddy arpeggio, right?

    Actually an arpeggio is an every other note scale.

    john

  41. #40

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    well, i won't be nitpicky, but "every other note" scale only works if we're adding the 7th, 9th, 11th and 13th to the arpeggio...sometimes we might only want some of the available notes...

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Curran
    Actually an arpeggio is an every other note scale.

    john
    Oh yeah, I know. But if you can consider any three or more notes played in unison a chord, could you not then also consider every note in a scale played simultaneously a chord too? From the major scale it'd be, like, a Maj7/6 Sus2 Add11 Chord, and it'd sound like a dog's breakfast, but it'd still be a chord.

  43. #42

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    true, true

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    .sometimes we might only want some of the available notes...
    Yes same is true for scales.

    john

  45. #44
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    Then again, I listen to John Scofield for an hour and can't help but wonder...

    I wonder if he'd sound better if I hit him in the back of the head with a 2x4.


    Why would I say such a thing?

    Check out his solo on "Norwegian Wood" from Hancock's "The New Standard". After which you might refer to him as Sucfield.

    Then again American society is predicated on absorbing the obnoxious like a sponge.


    Sorry, I've been anti-Scofield since 1989. I really dislike his "style" and his tone.

  46. #45

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    I haven't heard any of his earleir stuff, but I've heard it can be pretty brutal. Regardless, being that it's been nearly 20 years since 1989, he's had a lot of time to improve. Skills aside (and he's got a lot of 'em), his tone can be tough to get inside of. I'd shared the same opinion as you for the past three years... It's difficult to describe, but there was a moment when I went from going "Ugh, fix that tone or nobody's gonna listen to you" to "YES! Yes John Scofield! Do that all the time!"

  47. #46
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitas
    I haven't heard any of his earleir stuff, but I've heard it can be pretty brutal. Regardless, being that it's been nearly 20 years since 1989, he's had a lot of time to improve. Skills aside (and he's got a lot of 'em), his tone can be tough to get inside of. I'd shared the same opinion as you for the past three years... It's difficult to describe, but there was a moment when I went from going "Ugh, fix that tone or nobody's gonna listen to you" to "YES! Yes John Scofield! Do that all the time!"

    Well I've seen him live a few times. I liked him best in Billy Cobham's band in the late 70s. Quite a band, with the Brecker Brothers.

  48. #47

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    Billy Cobham, John Scofield, and the Brecker Brothers? Jeez, how could it not be!?

    Still, I highly recommend you pick up Uberjam next time you see it in your local supermarket. Okay, CD store. :P

  49. #48

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    actually, i've heard some of the really early sco and liked it a lot better than the stuff he's putting out currently...

    there is one early record when he plays with some "smooth" cats...i can't remember the name, but it's pretty awful.

    i think "saudades" with larry goldings and jack dejohnette is pretty excellent...then again, i like lifetime.

  50. #49

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    I'll certainly look into it... I just dropped a bunch of cash on discs, though, ao I don't think I'll be doing that again for quite some time. At least not til after Christmas. Chris Potter, Josh Redman, and Sco. It was a good week

  51. #50
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    actually, i've heard some of the really early sco and liked it a lot better than the stuff he's putting out currently...

    there is one early record when he plays with some "smooth" cats...i can't remember the name, but it's pretty awful.

    i think "saudades" with larry goldings and jack dejohnette is pretty excellent...then again, i like lifetime.

    Nah, you just like Goldings. Hey, he's good.