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  1. #801

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    This is a course about improvising lines, so there’s nothing specifically about comping, but you’ll spend some learning and hopefully internalizing common jazz rhythms which you can also use to comp. As the course progresses, the chord progressions increase in complexity, so you’ll be learning some harmony there as well.
    Thanks, any recommendations? At the moment I am transcribing piano comping but it is pretty tough to full understand it

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #802

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    I like the idea of transcribing the rhythms a piano player uses when comping, but using chord voicings that you’re already familiar with. I need to spend more time doing this! I think pianist Hank Jones‘s comping on Cannonball’s Autumn Leaves from the album Somethin’ Else is a master class on comping and would be a great place to start. Just start with a few bars and go from there. Just rhythms and basic voicings to start.

  4. #803

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aretium
    Thanks, any recommendations? At the moment I am transcribing piano comping but it is pretty tough to full understand it
    You may want to check out this for comping
    Vol. 54 Maiden Voyage Guitar Voicings (Play- a-Long): Mike Diliddo: 9781562240882: Amazon.com: Books

    I supplement my studies w/ Richie's course with that book.

    Sent from my vivo 1601 using Tapatalk

  5. #804

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    Hi everyone! I know this is a very old topic but, I'm planning to buy this course later today, have read the whole thread and got convinced.

    Anyone who completed the course (the 9 modules) here to share how it improved their playstyle?

  6. #805

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    'Please lose your smugness'? That's not right. He's merely expressing an opinion, in a very, clear, succint way, might I add.

  7. #806

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ
    Please lose your smugness. The CAGED system, or fundamental aspects thereof, has been around forever, lots of greats have used it. It's not that big of a deal, as I've said here for the one hundredth time I think .

    And yes we're just a bunch of schmoes trying to learn to play jazz using a variety of means, methods of study, , working on songs, and playing with people , who and throwing out ideas online. Apparently we haven't discovered the magic bullet but you have . I know, I know that's terrible and is infinitely inferior to what you're doing . Remind me again which "territory" band you are apprecing with , is it with cHick Webb or Fletcher Henderson ?
    Please lose your smugness'? That's not right. He's merely expressing an opinion, in a very, clear, succinct way, might I add.

  8. #807

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    Calling someone out on a 5 year old post? Really...?

  9. #808

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    I thought I was merely posting a comment, rather than 'calling somebody out', but then I don't speak American. Don't worry I'll not bother you again.

  10. #809

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    I like this method quite a bit, having used it as an electric bass player to help my soloing...probably should get back to it more diligently.

  11. #810

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    Do the books have tabulature?

  12. #811

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    So much online material now days. I wonder if this is still in the contending for one of the best Bebop guitar courses out there? Anyone have a thought?

  13. #812

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    I second your question. I am on the hunt for a swing jazz/jump blues course ie Duke Robillard, Charlie Baty, Charlie Christian. Seems every jazz guitar course out there today is bebop. I have been looking hard at Richie Zellars' BGIS as Vol 1 is based around the 12 bar blues.

    The poll taken sometime ago here at JG reveals that only about 30% finish the 1st course. That doesn't discourage me. I finished the Mikey Baker jazz guitar book 1 - it has about the same mortality rate.

    I signed up for Jens Larsen's Jazz Guitar Roadmap just over a month ago. I'm on lesson 8 of 10 and am a bit disappointed. It's focus is bebop, which was not clear to start, and was quite expensive for the information dispensed - $150US compared to BGIS gold at $90.

    If anyone has suggestions for the best online jazz guitar course, I'd love to hear from you.

  14. #813

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    Apparently so

  15. #814

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    Quote Originally Posted by Halifax Steve
    Apparently so
    I love researching various courses to see what they offer. I really don't recall seeing many courses that are "Jump Blues." You may want to go over to TrueFire and check out the video adverstisements they have for their courses. I would be there would be some Duke style Jump Blues courses, but probably mixed in with other types of Blues, possibly...?

    Duke has a Jump Blues book that you might like and it should hit your target squarely on the nose.

    https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Guita...s=books&sr=1-1

    Good luck in your quest.

  16. #815

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    Duke Robillard is an instructor with SonicJunction. I was a member for a few years. However, he only offers the how not the why. A great source to increase your catalogue but not for learning how to play jazz blues style guitar.

  17. #816

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    (By the way, that exchange between Cosmic Gumbo and IrishMuso, posts 807 and 808, was priceless. Please forgive me if it elicited a "chuckle" or two out of me. Even as he rests in peace, I can still recall his mischievous streak and at times, his biting humour. What a character he was. God bless his family and I hope they are well... Sorry, IrishMuso, if you are still around.)

  18. #817

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    Thx Alsoran, Truefire came back with a Jump Blues course by Matthieu Brandt Jump Blues - Guitar Lessons - Matt Brandt - TrueFire
    Again, it looks like its more of how vs why. But, for $40 i can't expect to much.
    I am leaning towards Richie Zellons BGIS, gold level - i am not comfortable with skype.
    Last edited by Halifax Steve; 11-17-2021 at 10:38 AM.

  19. #818

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    Quote Originally Posted by Halifax Steve
    Thx Alsoran, Truefire came back with a Jump Blues course by Matthieu Brandt Jump Blues - Guitar Lessons - Matt Brandt - TrueFire
    Again, it looks like its more of how vs why. But, for $40 i can't expect to much.
    I am leaning towards Richie Zellars BGIS, gold level - i am not comfortable with skype.
    Sounds like you're are making progress. Do you know what you are looking for? For example, are you looking for a course that has Jump Blues Licks, or maybe one with theory so that you know what scales or modes you would use? Maybe you are looking for a course that teaches the chord progressions or has entire songs for you to practice the various techniques and rhythmic inflections that characterize this type of music?
    Last edited by AlsoRan; 11-17-2021 at 03:17 PM.

  20. #819

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    Hey AlsoRan, I am looking for knowlege that I can apply to any song - standards and more. And yes, one with theory, scales, modes and a few songs to demonstrate its application would be great.

    I found an impartial review of Richie Zellons course on the 'tdpri' website. The write-up is from a country/western swing enthusiast. You may know that country (western) swing is very similar to Blues/Jazz swing. So, I found his write up to be very relevant.


    Richie Zellon Bebop Guitar Improv Series | Telecaster Guitar Forum

    So it looks like until i find something better, I'll be signing up for BGIS at the gold level, - i am not comfortable with skype offered at the platinum level.
    Last edited by Halifax Steve; 11-17-2021 at 10:38 AM. Reason: grammar

  21. #820
    It's not terrible. But it is kind of narrowly focused.

    Barry Harris does similar, but more broadly, if you're looking for something that's Bebop.

    To be fair to Mickey Baker and Harris, they've been around forever and have generations of real players who can point back to their methods being the starting point. You can't say the same for this course, and I don't know that you ever will. Anything's possible, but I'm not seeing it at this point.

    I think Zellon's course may be best viewed as supplementary. Just my opinion after looking at it and digesting.

  22. #821

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    I'll look at Barry Harris. I am not so much into Bebop but swing - focusing on soloing. That cascade soloing style by guys like Herb Ellis knocks me out

  23. #822
    Quote Originally Posted by Halifax Steve
    I'll look at Barry Harris. I am not so much into Bebop but swing - focusing on soloing. That cascade soloing style by guys like Herb Ellis knocks me out
    Harris is definitely dominant Bebop approaches. His material is helpful for contextualizing more difficult to hear and longer approach vocabulary. Those chromatic approaches aren't just random. He somewhat gives name/place to those type of bebop lines you'd transcribe.

    If you're looking more straight swing, I'd say transcribe lines and transpose them to all positions etc.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 11-18-2021 at 01:46 AM.

  24. #823

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    Thanks Matt,
    And yes, if i hear a song i really like i do transcribe it. I've only done a few but I expect it gets easier as I continue.

    So, you mention Zellon's course as a supplement. I have completed Mikey Bakers book one and years ago complete Berklee's book one so perhaps a supplement is warranted.

    I was with www.sonicjuntion.com Duke Robillard, but dropped out as i wasn't getting the why behind his soloing. I think he uses a lot of mixolydian over his jazz blues songs.

  25. #824

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher
    It's not terrible. But it is kind of narrowly focused.
    Having done most of the course, I’ll say that it is extremely focused, but that that is not a bad thing. Can you master anything in this pursuit of jazz without lots and lots of time, energy, and focus?

    The course provides a structured approach to internalizing chord tones and various chord tone embellishments in a way that I have not seen replicated elsewhere. And it does so over common jazz changes. It provides a fingering model that makes a lot of sense, in that it ties fingerings to the chord interval of the moment.

    If you stick with it, you will have a lot of bebop “raw material” under your fingers and in your ears.

    The shortcomings of this method, as I see them, are that the exercises create a sort of “ventriloquism jazz”—it is not hard at all to sound extremely unhip running all these permutations of embellishments sort of arbitrarily through Zellon’s rhythm templates. But I think that’s more a matter of expectation. The key is not to forget that these are basically mechanical exercises designed to help master the *mechanics* and unique sounds of various chord tone embellishments—you’re still responsible for listening to jazz to hear the embellishments in actual jazz performance, recognizing which embellishments work and which don’t, and above all else avoiding the square feel these exercises seem to encourage. But I think you’ll be hard-pressed to find a better method for practicing and internalize and perhaps even actually mastering chord tone embellishments.

    Also, as an aside, Zellon is providing a method where you can sit down and basically be told what to do and you will learn a lot. Barry Harris’s stuff is awesome, but the learner really needs to provide the structure—there is no syllabus per se, but a lot of interesting ideas that the learner needs to figure out how to incorporate into their practice.

  26. #825

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    Thx wzpgsr, what level of subscription did you subscribe?