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  1. #1

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    Randy Vincent has an new book out; Jazz Guitar Soloing: The Cellular Approach. There are some sample pages up on the Sher publishing site.

    Looks interesting its a .pdf so no waiting for your mailman to finish his lunch to get it to you. Or you can wait for January for the printed book.

    Jazz Guitar Soloing: The Cellular Approach by Randy Vincent | Sher Music Co.
    Last edited by docbop; 12-08-2014 at 07:44 PM.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Thanks for the heads up Doc. Randy's last book, 'Line Games' is excellent and one I dip into regularly for new ideas.

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  4. #3

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    Randy Vincent is building a great library!
    I have his chord books and they are my favorites.
    This book has to be great too, reminds me the linear Ligon's book approach with a modern feeling.

  5. #4

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    Thanks for posting, at $24 it's a good deal.
    “I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet.”
    ― Mahatma Gandhi

  6. #5

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    NO!! I don't need more books, but I'm almost certain to buy this one. His two chords books are among my favorites.

    At least books are cheaper than guitars! I try hard to stay with a concept for a while, and not to get pulled from book to book (or idea to idea, whatever the source).

  7. #6

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    Is someone already working with the book?
    Any comment about the contents?

  8. #7

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    I have the first "line games" book and think its a great book. I have worked my way trough first hexatonic chapter and loved it. Problem is that it took me about 6 months to do so... I can't even dream of going trough this book in my life so... Ill probably buy the new one anyway... GBAS (guitar book acquisition syndrome)

  9. #8

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    I have the same syndrome.

  10. #9

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    I'll check this out. I've been curious about his books for a while, they seem well-regarded.

  11. #10

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    I have bought the book.
    Just like the others from Mr. Vincent, its contents are very well structured and after playing some of the lines described it will help me with those super hip lines over fast progressions.

    It remembers me one of the Bergonzi books, Melodic structures, but I prefer this one who is focused on guitar (it provides useful fingerings) and I prefer its structure as well. I thought it was more like the Linear harmony book from Ligon but this has a more modern flavor. Better for me, because I have two very different books.

    My approach about books is to take them as a helping device for building vocabulary, but the most important way for this keeps being to listen records and trying to steal as much as possible.

    Anyway, steal as much as you can, from records, from books, who cares, the important think is to be capable of internalize that music and to use it in your solos.

  12. #11

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    Any one have both of these books?

    Is "Line Games" a prerequisite to "The Cellular Approach"?

    I am thinking of ordering a .pdf of one or both.


    Danielle

  13. #12

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    Amazon has it @ $22.01 & free ship with $35 in orders.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    Any one have both of these books?

    Is "Line Games" a prerequisite to "The Cellular Approach"?

    I am thinking of ordering a .pdf of one or both.


    Danielle

    I'm a recovering Book-aholic so I have both the books, but haven't spent a lot of time with either one. Where my improv studies are headed they don't quite fit in right now, but I'll eventually go back and spend more time with them. They both look good and the Cellular Approach he's assuming you have some familiarity with Line Games, but what I did see to me didn't matter. I lent Line Games to a buddy and he liked it a lot.

    If get one after you get familiar with it, hope you post what your opinion is.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  15. #14

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    Hmm, I really like the description of the Cellular Approach. I don't have Line Games but am thinking of going straight to the Cellular Approach. Andrew Green's Jazz Guitar Structures was one I liked that perhaps has a similar high level approach.

  16. #15

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    Well, I just placed an order the the Cellular Approach book. I really like the concept and hope it clicks with me.

    I had his Drop 2 Chord book and it didn't click with me. It had good info, but I didn't jive with the way it's presented for some reason.

  17. #16

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    The book came in this weekend and I've literally just started the first few pages. If anyone wants to start a study group thread or something on the book, I'd be interested.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hallpass View Post
    The book came in this weekend and I've literally just started the first few pages. If anyone wants to start a study group thread or something on the book, I'd be interested.

    There's no better man for starting the study group thread than your good self.
    “I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet.”
    ― Mahatma Gandhi

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by hallpass View Post
    The book came in this weekend and I've literally just started the first few pages. If anyone wants to start a study group thread or something on the book, I'd be interested.
    Hi hallpass,
    I talked with Randy on Friday and he told me he'd received numerous Skype lesson requests after his first book came out by guitarists wanting more info. Now that he's got Skype set up on his website as well as his upcoming Newsletter, you might want to drop him a note and let him know of some of things you're interested in.
    Lessons | Randy Vincent
    Newsletter | Randy Vincent

    Thanks!
    -Bob

  20. #19

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    It seems a few people here bought the book. Any one care to report on it and there experience so far?

    Danielle

  21. #20

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    Just got it and played trough first few examples - it seems a bit more organized than Line Games (which I like a lot despite somewhat chaotic approach). I have high hopes for it.

  22. #21

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    I haven't gotten too far with my copy yet because a couple gigs sort of got in the way. I'm in the first section where he goes over 4 note "cells" to play over a progression dominant chords (and fast moving dominant chord progression). For example, play a cell of the dominant chord's 1, 2, 3, 5...then a cell of the 1, b7, 6, 5...tweaking the ordering of them, etc.

  23. #22

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    Following the advice from hallpass I will copy and answer (is mine) from other thread that concerns the last Vincent book:

    "I am working now with the "cellular approach" from last Randy Vincent book and it is helping me a lot.
    It is about playing longer lines but gathering short four note phrases, and it is being the best method I know for learning the fretboard.
    When you think about this approach sure you are thinking: this is jazz not maths!!! I thought that way but I do the next.
    Each week I choose a new cell, let's say: 1 3 5 7, or 3579 or 3579 with a leap (Barry Harris 3rd phrase), or simply the descendant scale from every scale tone, then I practice gathering lines. First I practice playing without changes, always in the same chord, then I practice the typical chord changes, I to IV, V to I, and so on.

    But the important step is to practice freely after this first practice part, having fun playing, and then you begin to choose your notes in a perfect sounding way, it is amazing!

    Apart from this, one think I like to do is to improvise vocally over a jam track, trying to figure melodic lines without the instrument. Sometimes I record my favourite "mental" lines and I transcribe them after, then with only two exercises my practice is complete and I have covered these areas: Improvisation, fretboard knowledge, ear training and composition!!!"

    Putting this on the paper:

    If I take a minor ii v I Bird phrase, just thinking in scale numbers I can see this:
    (I use to write 9 if the phrase ascends from another chord tone and 2 if its something scalar or descends, the same with 4/11 and 6/13)
    C7: R b2 R 7 b7 b6 5 4 3 5 b7 b9 to Fm: 5 b3 R 2 4 b3 5 7 9 11 9/2 b3 4 b3

    We can see some things here:
    1. As Barry Harris says, I think bebop players didn't think about ii V I, I think they played V to I but as in this case they used a dominant scale in the V that "knows where it is going". Here he is using the minor's dominant scale, call it phrygian if you want (Don't say to Harris). You can see those b2, b6 and b7 chord tones.
    2. The use of cells:
    a.R b2 R. Ornament.
    b.R 7 b7 b6 5 4 - 3. Descendant dominant scale with a 7th passing tone.
    c.3 5 b7 b9. A fundamental cell, easy to hear in any bebop composition. You can play like and ascending arpeggio or like a bebop leap where the 5th falls and octave and ascends. As you can see is a the diminished chord found in the third of dominant, in C7: E G Bb Db (could be D if C7 would go to F major).
    d. 5 b3 R 2 4 - b3. Descending arpeggio with added notes that surround the b3. I think this is the 3rd Ligon outline.
    e. b3 5 7 9 11. Ascending superarpeggio. Just like c.
    f. 2 b3 4 b3. Ornament figure to surround the b3.

    If you hear the phrase you're hearing a long, beauty, bebop phrase, but as you can see it is made from little cells that build the bigger one.

    When I began to learn more about the (amazing) Barry Harris, I didn't agree about the importance of scales and arpeggios in his didactics, but it is not about formulas, it is about the way you use them and the way you are exploring your musicality.
    Last edited by sjl; 06-02-2015 at 03:38 AM.

  24. #23

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    By the way:
    Reno de Stefano in his Wes Montgomery awesome book (some chapters are avalaible for free) speaks about Formulaic improvisation: "Formulaic Improvisation can be defined as the creation of new material from a distinct body of fragmentary music ideas. In this procedure many different formulas are mixed and interpolated to form continuous melodic lines".

    Reno De Stefano web:
    Reno De Stefano, jazz guitarist

  25. #24

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    Randy's new book!

    BUILDING SOLO LINES FROM CELLS by Randy Vincent
    For ALL instruments. Randy's thorough and critically-acclaimed method for learning to solo like the masters. Now designed for any instrument.
    Building Solo Lines from Cells by Randy Vincent | Sher Music Co.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobafifi View Post
    Randy's new book!

    BUILDING SOLO LINES FROM CELLS by Randy Vincent
    For ALL instruments. Randy's thorough and critically-acclaimed method for learning to solo like the masters. Now designed for any instrument.
    Building Solo Lines from Cells by Randy Vincent | Sher Music Co.
    Compared the table of contents to "the cellular approach". Based on the table of contents it looks the same as the "Cellular Approach" but modified so it's not guitar specific.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by sjl View Post
    It remembers me one of the Bergonzi books, Melodic structures
    Yes, me too. I find four note structures are very useful for playing changes. The trick is pick a system that works for you and really get it down. I have working the Bergonzi system(s) for a few years and find the four note structures as a great reference point for everything else I practice - Pentatonics, Modes, Be-bop scales, etc...

  28. #27

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    I finally went ahead and bought the .pdf download version.

    Looks like there's a lot of content in there and it's going to take some time to really get into some of the exercises. I have to admit I am not having an easy playing the exercises with the slides, hammer on, and pull offs that I believe are suggested as shown in his notation. I think I am inclined to leave some that out and just play most of the notes with a pick.

  29. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    I finally went ahead and bought the .pdf download version.

    Looks like there's a lot of content in there and it's going to take some time to really get into some of the exercises. I have to admit I am not having an easy playing the exercises with the slides, hammer on, and pull offs that I believe are suggested as shown in his notation. I think I am inclined to leave some that out and just play most of the notes with a pick.
    cool. Keep updated on your thoughts as you work through..

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by sjl View Post
    Is someone already working with the book?
    Any comment about the contents?
    It includes serial tone rows and 23rd chords if you like it outside - some Mike Stern examples etc. All new terminology to me.

    The book has some clever fingering ideas that I might not have considered just noodling.

    I like Randy's books.

    I also like Jerry Coker's Patterns for Jazz - it's free on PDF - It's old but filled with practice ideas.

    http://www.u.arizona.edu/~gross/Jerr...s_For_Jazz.pdf

    But no fingering suggestions for guitar - which could be a plus if you have the patience to work them out for yourself. I'm a poor reader but it's doable and you tend to experiment more with alternate fingerings.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    cool. Keep updated on your thoughts as you work through..

    Just thought I would drop a quick note here to say that I have been working on the exercises in this book. I have to admit, I am finding it to be a little slow going. This is not the only thing I have been working on. I have managed to work on the exercise up to and including 1 -16, on page 5 of the book.

    I can kind of like these beginning exercise in that they seem to facilitate movement up and down the neck.

    Although referenced as 7ths, I see the Root, 2nd, b3rd and 5th in these beginning exercises. I gather this is common in lieu of playing the exact notes in a dominant 7th arpeggio.

    Any one else working with the book?

  32. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    Just thought I would drop a quick note here to say that I have been working on the exercises in this book. I have to admit, I am finding it to be a little slow going. This is not the only thing I have been working on. I have managed to work on the exercise up to and including 1 -16, on page 5 of the book.

    I can kind of like these beginning exercise in that they seem to facilitate movement up and down the neck.

    Although referenced as 7ths, I see the Root, 2nd, b3rd and 5th in these beginning exercises. I gather this is common in lieu of playing the exact notes in a dominant 7th arpeggio.

    Any one else working with the book?
    I picked it up a couple of weeks ago, and spent some time with it on a trip . Haven't done as much with it the last couple of weeks, but it looks like a great reference book. Kind of "rest of your life" kind of thing for pattern ideas.

    Being my usual, bad-student self, I mostly blew off the fingerings immediately. Also applied the patterns a good bit more in-position, and a good bit more diatonically. I worked through the first 10 pages or so, again, much of it diatonically and in-position .

    I try to not have too many things going on once, as I don't have a lot of time, but when I get back into this, I'll probably use the chapter 3 "longer II V progressions" as a template for working through the patterns at the beginning of the book and connecting different ones. I'm more interested in immediately applying to general tunes/longer progressions and not just short/fast dominant cycles.

    I understand the pedagogical advantages to doing dominants in the beginning, but it doesn't jive as well with other things I'm working on right now.

  33. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    Although referenced as 7ths, I see the Root, 2nd, b3rd and 5th in these beginning exercises. I gather this is common in lieu of playing the exact notes in a dominant 7th arpeggio.
    yeah. Those are basically "patterns you can play over dominant seventh", not straight dominant seventh arpeggios. Chord tones with passing tones. you'll notice they begin and end on chord tones.

  34. #33

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    Keep at it, Danielle. Those patterns down the neck really come together once they're transformed into close positional studies as in ex. 1-17.

    I have a library full of general music and guitar books as I'm a print junkie but mostly create my own exercises these days both for myself and students. Having said that, I consider Randy Vincent's The Cellular Approach to be one of the great single-line jazz guitar books. So much content structured in a practical, logical yet exploratory manner. It's one of the few books of its type that I've actually worked through in its entirety. In fact, I'll often warm up on a practice session with the positional dominant cycles (e.g. ex. 1-16, 1-31 and 1-41) and ii-V cycles (from ex. 1-100 onwards).

    One piece of advice. Follow Randy's suggested fingerings as the slurs are placed in line with standard jazz articulation (accenting weak to strong beats).

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    I have a library full of general music and guitar books as I'm a print junkie but mostly create my own exercises these days both for myself and students. Having said that, I consider Randy Vincent's The Cellular Approach to be one of the great single-line jazz guitar books. So much content structured in a practical, logical yet exploratory manner. It's one of the few books of its type that I've actually worked through in its entirety. In fact, I'll often warm up on a practice session with the positional dominant cycles (e.g. ex. 1-16, 1-31 and 1-41) and ii-V cycles (from ex. 1-100 onwards).

    One piece of advice. Follow Randy's suggested fingerings as the slurs are placed in line with standard jazz articulation (accenting weak to strong beats).
    That's high praise indeed. This goes onto my Wish List.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #35

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    A bit of Randy playing over the changes of "All The Things You Are." (I had not seen or heard him before.) Turns out he's another guy who 'sings what he plays'.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #36

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    I am still working with this book, however it's not my only focus. So far I have only worked on examples 1-1 through 1-23. (Root to Root cycles). I have been following his fingering, but have not been using pull offs that seem to be implied by some of the tied notes.

    I find I need to very careful with this book as I find it's all to easy to find myself spending too much time looking at the fret board, especially when going through the exercises for the first few times. My neck will let me know if I spend too much time looking down.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    Keep at it, Danielle. Those patterns down the neck really come together once they're transformed into close positional studies as in ex. 1-17.

    I have a library full of general music and guitar books as I'm a print junkie but mostly create my own exercises these days both for myself and students. Having said that, I consider Randy Vincent's The Cellular Approach to be one of the great single-line jazz guitar books. So much content structured in a practical, logical yet exploratory manner. It's one of the few books of its type that I've actually worked through in its entirety. In fact, I'll often warm up on a practice session with the positional dominant cycles (e.g. ex. 1-16, 1-31 and 1-41) and ii-V cycles (from ex. 1-100 onwards).

    One piece of advice. Follow Randy's suggested fingerings as the slurs are placed in line with standard jazz articulation (accenting weak to strong beats).

    I have been working with the book, and I am just now working on the 1-41 exercise. I as well find the dominant cycles you reference above to be good. Even though I have been playing guitar for many years, I that step from the 3rd to 2nd string, often throws me. I think these exercises may help in that regard.

  39. #38

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    Hello All,


    I am planning on starting up a Study Group in May 2017 based on Randy Vincent’s book “The Cellular Approach”. I figured that we could give everybody a month to check out the book and decide whether or not they would like to commit to the group. The book explores cellular improvisation. A cell is a four note group with at least 3 chord tones. It is meant to lead to building improvisations that are melodic and follow the chord changes logically.


    The Introduction reads: “This book is a collection of things to practice on the guitar that will help to develop the vocabulary of jazz improvisation while simultaneously developing and maintaining single-note technique. . . . the focus will mainly be on “cellular” improvisation, which is using very short melodic cells strung together into longer lines. Once we get to the place where we are using strings of cells for “outside” and “free” playing we will move beyond the cellular concept and into some other approaches. I have included many lines and phrases transcribed from the recordings of several master guitarists to demonstrate the validity of the concepts behind the exercises given.”


    There are 5 chapters in this book: Chapter 1 - Cycles and II-V Sequences (247 examples). Chapter 2 - Turnarounds (163 examples). Chapter 3 - Longer Progressions (192 examples). Chapter 4 Outside and Free Playing (113 examples). Chapter 5 - More Outside Lines - All Purpose Licks including Chromatic Intervals, Serial Tone Rows, and 23rd Chords (99 examples)


    I have had this book on my shelf for the past 2 years but I have only played the first 5 pages. Maybe a group will help motivate me and others to incorporate this concept into my own playing.


    The book does not come with a CD (at least my book didn’t). I use iRealPro for backing tracks.



    1. My plan right now is to learn 10 examples a month. Each example is only 2 to four bars long. I have completed the first 12 with minimal effort. I would estimate that this is a 1 to 2 hour commitment per month. We may want to change this depending on the pace maintained by the group once it gets going, plus at that rate it would take us 6 years and 9 months to complete the book.
    2. Discuss or post your performing of the examples.
    3. Discuss or post where to play the “Cells” on the neck of the guitar. Even though Randy does give some indication where he would like the cells to be played, as we know they are always alternative fingerings.
    4. Discuss or post the application of these “cells” into Jazz Standards. I think that this is the most vital part of the exercise. A concept is only a concept until it is made a reality (I just made that up. It is not a famous quote)
    5. At some point, (maybe at the conclusion) I would combine this with Randy’s other famous book “Line Games” and see how it relates to the playing of great guitarists like Wes Montgomery, Jimmy Raney, Tal Farlow, Pat Martino and Joe Pass



    I will be posting this on several threads so I apologize if you seeing this more than once.


    Let me know what you think.

  40. #39

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    FYI, I somehow got away from the book. I still do the exercises that PMB referenced as a warm up exercise.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    FYI, I somehow got away from the book. I still do the exercises that PMB referenced as a warm up exercise.
    Let me know if you want to join us. We would love to have you.

  42. #41

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    Cool. I've been working through the book. I'm interested to see what everyone does with it.

  43. #42

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    Great !!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  44. #43

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    For those starting out in jazz guitar and teachers looking for useful resources, this new release by Randy Vincent should be another winner:

    The Guitarist's Introduction to Jazz by Randy Vincent | Sher Music Co.

  45. #44

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