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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    OK since fep has been hounding us to upload videos of us playing, here's a half-assed attempt. Major arps, Elliot's Patterns I and IV (Shapes 3 and 7 according to Bruno).
    Thanks for posting, Jeff. Nice work on the arps!

    Also - nice tort pickguard. Dig that look.
    Don't practice until you get it right. Practice until you can't get it wrong.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by onetruevibe View Post
    Also - nice tort pickguard. Dig that look.
    Thanks ... it's a Godin 5th Avenue (acoustic). I think the pick guard is plastic. :-) I like the guitar quite a bit, despite my initial reticence towards it. I'm thinking of getting a Kingpin II with dual P90s.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Also, I dig your right hand. I've recently switched to "floating," and to picking mostly from the elbow (everybody groan together) as Django did (now everybody stop groaning.)

    Are you holding your pick with two fingers?
    Yes, two fingers, except I also have a habit of gripping with my middle finger when things get tricky/fast/tough. I tried to do the GB picking thing and it just didn't work for me. I've also tried the Paul Gilbert cinch-down-on-the-pick thing and I can't get that to work well either. So I'm just trying to see how far I can take my "default" pick holding style. It does break down at faster speeds (like when I'm doing my Frank Gambale workouts) but maybe that just needs more practice.

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    OK since fep has been hounding us to upload videos of us playing, here's a half-assed attempt. Major arps, Elliot's Patterns I and IV (Shapes 3 and 7 according to Bruno).

    Nice job Jeff, good time, good technique.

    You gave me an idea. My forum name should be 'HoundDog', that's much better than fep (fep = my initials).
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  5. #104

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    This Study Group is really going good.

    Gersdal's worksheet, Brian's interactive arpeggio tool, all the ideas of variations on practicing the arpeggios, the recordings. I think this is what it's all about.

    Thanks everyone.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  6. #105

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    Here's a corrected version of my pdf. I think (hope) it's all correct now ... Let me know if you find something that has skipped my check.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    This Study Group is really going good.

    Gersdal's worksheet, Brian's interactive arpeggio tool, all the ideas of variations on practicing the arpeggios, the recordings. I think this is what it's all about.

    Thanks everyone.
    I agree completely - I'm really enjoying this group. Lots of knowledgeable members with a good variety of experience. And thanks to you fep for facilitating for us. It certainly is a gift we all appreciate.

    FYI - I blew off weed-wacking the back yard yesterday and added an intervalic fretboard option to the arpeggio tool instead. When I think about the character of a chord/arpeggio, I think in terms of intervals, not note names.

    So, yeah...this makes more sense to me.
    Don't practice until you get it right. Practice until you can't get it wrong.

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    This Study Group is really going good.
    I'd say mostly thanks to you, Frank!

  9. #108

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    Essential Arpeggios

    Dave Woods website has some good info on Root Position Chord Voicing and arpeggios which he calls the ". . . basics, in understanding improvisation, and Transposing Key Positions Through All Twelve Keys, and Backing Tracks for the Modes."

    Although his stuff is graphical and "shape" oriented, and not in standard notation, he shows intervals, note names, and fingering notation for scales, modes, and especially arpeggios in five key positions up and down the neck. A wealth of info which can be downloaded-free!

    Take a look.

    http://www.jazzguitarstartingright.com/index.html

    My book should arrive Tuesday.

    Oldern

  10. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by onetruevibe View Post
    arpeggio tool

    When I think about the character of a chord/arpeggio, I think in terms of intervals, not note names.
    I do the same thing, I believe... in scales OR arpeggios, I'm oftentimes aware only of the scale degree, not the note name. I need to work at this, but IMHO, awareness of the scale degree is probably more beneficial to an improviser.

    And now that I think about it, I'm more aware of the solfege note -- where I am, and what's this note's musical "character"... is it a "sol" or a "mi" or a "ti" -- or what? But this is all in doodling and noodling - I've been so perfectionistic, I've never really allowed myself to improvise all-out. Isn't that nuts? Maybe in this study group I'll be forced to.

    kj

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldern View Post
    Essential Arpeggios

    Dave Woods website has some good info on Root Position Chord Voicing and arpeggios which he calls the ". . . basics, in understanding improvisation, and Transposing Key Positions Through All Twelve Keys, and Backing Tracks for the Modes."

    Although his stuff is graphical and "shape" oriented, and not in standard notation, he shows intervals, note names, and fingering notation for scales, modes, and especially arpeggios in five key positions up and down the neck. A wealth of info which can be downloaded-free!

    Take a look.

    http://www.jazzguitarstartingright.com/index.html

    My book should arrive Tuesday.

    Oldern
    This is one of the best jazz guitar sites I've ever seen. It might be THE best, in many ways. Matt Warnock's site is awesome, too. In tandem with this one right here, a jazz guitarist shouldn't need much else.

  12. #111

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    "This is one of the best jazz guitar sites I've ever seen. It might be THE best, in many ways. Matt Warnock's site is awesome, too. In tandem with this one right here, a jazz guitarist shouldn't need much else." - Kojo27.

    Based on your comments here, I presume you would not bother to look at Dave’s site and that it would be unproductive for others to do so?

    Kojo27, I'm not putting this site down in any way-at least that was not my intention. I spent several months reading the Theory and Getting Started sections and now have worked my way into the Improvisation section. I think this is a great site. However, unlike what you appear to believe, I find nothing wrong with referencing other work if it adds to our body of knowledge, saves us time, helps us learn more, or supplements a course we are taking. Much of the value in this site (jazzguitar.be/forum) lies in the vast world of additional knowledge it references on a daily basis.

    If you prefer not to use the site I listed, that is certainly your prerogative. If you find fault with it, I would love to hear your analysis, perhaps in a private message or another forum. I am a novice with jazz guitar music but my ears perk up when someone seems to suggest that we have all that is necessary and that nothing else is needed. This site wouldn’t be here if that were the prevailing attitude of its many contributors.

  13. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldern View Post
    "This is one of the best jazz guitar sites I've ever seen. It might be THE best, in many ways. Matt Warnock's site is awesome, too. In tandem with this one right here, a jazz guitarist shouldn't need much else." - Kojo27.

    Based on your comments here, I presume you would not bother to look at Dave’s site and that it would be unproductive for others to do so?

    Kojo27, I'm not putting this site down in any way-at least that was not my intention. I spent several months reading the Theory and Getting Started sections and now have worked my way into the Improvisation section. I think this is a great site. However, unlike what you appear to believe, I find nothing wrong with referencing other work if it adds to our body of knowledge, saves us time, helps us learn more, or supplements a course we are taking. Much of the value in this site (jazzguitar.be/forum) lies in the vast world of additional knowledge it references on a daily basis.

    If you prefer not to use the site I listed, that is certainly your prerogative. If you find fault with it, I would love to hear your analysis, perhaps in a private message or another forum. I am a novice with jazz guitar music but my ears perk up when someone seems to suggest that we have all that is necessary and that nothing else is needed. This site wouldn’t be here if that were the prevailing attitude of its many contributors.
    Hi Oldern,

    I meant that Dave's site, which you linked me to, is "...one of the best jazz guitar sites I've ever seen. It might be THE best, in many ways." "This" is one of the best.... meant "this one mentioned in the post I've quoted." I can see how it was confusing.

    So, this is YOUR suggested site I'm talking about. I went on to say that Matt Warnock has a great jazz site, too, and that Dave's site, together with Matt's, might be all a body needs for learning jazz guitar. (Besides listening, practice, a good teacher, etc. I meant all you need for instructional material.)

    I'm at Dave's site right now, actually - reading his insightful essays ("read this first...) - sorry if the post above was unclear.

    kj
    Last edited by Kojo27; 05-11-2012 at 11:40 AM.

  14. #113

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    Thank yew, Kojo27! I thought tentatively and briefly you may have meant that Dave's site was good. I will be extemely interested in any comments you have about Dave's site. I have a ton of stuff I downloaded when he began to shuck old stuff to make room for new stuff.

    Take a look at his analysis of You Stepped Out Of A Dream. Even I could learn that tune if I would take the time.

    Oldern

  15. #114

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    Well.. first ... this is a major technical breakthrough ... I've taped a video ... I've created a youtube account ... and I managed to upload the video



    The content is just me doing one of the arps ... It's getting better, nowhere close to perfect...

  16. #115

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    ^ Great job Gersdal, you played that real well.

    And congrats on the technological breakthrough.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  17. #116

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    I'm really clumsy at switching from picking to fingerpicking, so I decided to multitask that with playing the arpeggios. Also, I think it's good to once in a while include the chords in the exercise to get that chord to arpeggio connection going.

    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  18. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by gersdal View Post
    Well.. first ... this is a major technical breakthrough ... I've taped a video ... I've created a youtube account ... and I managed to upload the video



    The content is just me doing one of the arps ... It's getting better, nowhere close to perfect...
    Way to go, dude! That's hard to do - congrats. You playing a Gibson there?

    Kojo

  19. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by gersdal View Post
    Well.. first ... this is a major technical breakthrough ... I've taped a video ... I've created a youtube account ... and I managed to upload the video

    The content is just me doing one of the arps ... It's getting better, nowhere close to perfect...
    Nice work gersdal! YouTube account, video content! Next stop...Facebook!
    Don't practice until you get it right. Practice until you can't get it wrong.

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by onetruevibe View Post
    Nice work gersdal! YouTube account, video content! Next stop...Facebook!
    Ouch! Don't remind me

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Way to go, dude! That's hard to do - congrats. You playing a Gibson there?

    Kojo
    Yes. Gibson Herb Ellis model.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Jeff - I don't mean to nit-pick, and it really doesn't matter, but didn't he say to play from the root of each arpeggio contained in pattern I, to the highest note on the high E, and then back down the arpeggio to the lowest note on the low E, and then back up to the root note? It's the way I did them, i.e., start on F at 5th string, 8th fret, arp your way up to C on 1st string 8th fret, come back down, but bypass the 5th string F "root" and arp on down to play the 5th fret 6th string A note (3rd in F), and then just go C, E, F, and voila! F maj7 arpeggio. Then do Em7 arpeggio the same basic way, continuing then through all 7 arpeggios in that fingering.)kj
    That"s how I'm doing them, Kojo. I'm glad I came late to this party because I got the book from Amazon for fifteen bucks, less than five days after I ordered. (Friday night to Tuesday morning, I think it was.)

    I'm nowhere near as fleet as fep on this exercise! But I sense its value and will will work on this lesson daily until I'm pretty good at it before going to the next chapter (-3, I think.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #122

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    Doing arpeggios in all patterns at 150 bpm was a goal of mine:

    Last edited by fep; 06-18-2012 at 07:30 PM.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  24. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Doing arpeggios in all patterns at 150 bpm was a goal of mine:
    Way to go Frank!!! Well-played, and I dare say most guitarists in the world couldn't pull that one off.


    kj

  25. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Doing arpeggios in all patterns at 150 bpm was a goal of mine:
    Great work Frank on both recent videos!

  26. #125

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    Got the book this morning and I'm working through it at the moment. I'm moving through it pretty fast since I thought it'd be beneficial for me to learn all the arpeggio inversions a couple months ago. One part I'm concerned is where in chapter two the book tells me to use alternate picking. I used to alternate pick until about a year where I switched to economy picking (the idea of picking in the direction of the next string). With economy picking it reduces movement in order to reach a higher speed. I've finally felt comfortable with it over the last couple on months and I'm hesitant about switching back to alternate picking. To those of you further in the book and generally more advanced in the study of jazz, is strict alternate picking absolutely necessary?

  27. #126

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    fep- I noticed that you seem to economy pick down but alternate while moving up. Is there a specific reason for that?

  28. #127

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    I have added this too my study regimen.

    Thanks a lot for this thread. I am already earning dividends on this subject. I found inspiration in the videos posted. I don't want to leave this chapter until I really have the arpeggios down cold but I will be following the trail you have collectively blazed for the rest of us.

    This forum has brought me so, so far.

  29. #128

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    major and minor arps, gulp!



    small bauble on one note for the 120bpm major , sorry
    I also over emphasize the downbeat of each and like to slow up at the end of each set, stupid
    Last edited by cubistguitar; 08-09-2012 at 02:11 PM.

  30. #129

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    I've been following this thread awhile, and decided I'd give it a shot.





    Terrific job everyone. Keep working at it!
    Last edited by Dana; 01-02-2013 at 02:13 PM.
    Check out my new book, Essential Skills for the Guitarist on Amazon.

  31. #130

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    Keep plugging away, folks! I am working on learning the pattern 3 Major/ 4 pattern 4 Minor Arpeggios right now.

    I have played around a little working in the Locrian #2 and the Altered Scale and I like the two tonalities. I was struck by the sounds in that they sounded very familiar to me. There are probably countless songs harbored deep in my memory that have used that approach of using the altered scale on the V7 chord. It just felt good.

    It was good to know I have a feeling for more that just pentatonic type soloing, as I had at first feared.

    Best of luck to you both!

  32. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    I've been following this thread awhile, and decided I'd give it a shot.
    Beautiful tele you got there -- and great picking. Been at the guitar a while, huh?

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Doing arpeggios in all patterns at 150 bpm was a goal of mine:
    Nice job. That's a goal for me as well. Having all five patterns nailed in every key should really open up options for improvising.
    Check out my new book, Essential Skills for the Guitarist on Amazon.

  34. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Nice job. That's a goal for me as well. Having all five patterns nailed in every key should really open up options for improvising.
    Something tells me you'll reach that goal...

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Something tells me you'll reach that goal...
    I hope so. I tend to get distracted and move too quickly from one thing to another. I like these threads as they are a good way of focusing on one topic for a good while as well as providing a goal to work towards. Nice to see everyone's playing and working on getting better.

    Thanks for the vote of confidence Lorenzo.
    Last edited by Dana; 11-08-2012 at 10:10 PM.
    Check out my new book, Essential Skills for the Guitarist on Amazon.

  36. #135

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    I finally got around to doing this. I'd been practicing it awhile. I just needed to figure out how to use iMovie (still working on it)

    Anyway, I've been practicing the 5 patterns in the book as well as 2 additional patterns I'd learned previously in the Bill Leavitt books. I've been doing it in a couple of keys every day as a warm up. Metronome at 80 with the clicks on beats 2 and 4.

    Last edited by Dana; 01-02-2013 at 02:16 PM.
    Check out my new book, Essential Skills for the Guitarist on Amazon.

  37. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    I finally got around to doing this. I'd been practicing it awhile. I just needed to figure out how to use iMovie (still working on it)

    Anyway, I've been practicing the 5 patterns in the book as well as 2 additional patterns I'd learned previously in the Bill Leavitt Books. I've been doing it in a couple of keys every day as a warm up. Metronome at 80 with the clicks on beats 2 and 4.
    Great job, Dana! Lots of notes, lots of neck... extracting arpeggios from some of the Leavitt fingerings can be a bear w/the pinky barres and so on... those are the fingerings I use and like a lot. // Good clean picking - keep it up.

    You know, I've been playing Leavitt on my arch top acoustic w/13s... I'm starting to think I'd make faster progress on an electric with 11s.

  38. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Edit: Oops, I just realized I used pattern IV.

    In this exercise we are to play all the arpeggios in sequence in Major Pattern I (no I didn't I used pattern IV, I was suppose to use Pattern I).

    I ended each arpeggio on the 3rd and then went down to the root of the next arpeggio. I thought it was a good way to smoothly go from arp to arp.

    I am hoping to receive the book next week but in the meantime I have been using FrankLearns worksheets and can now play the Major Pattern 1 arpeggios in sequence. I'll try to post a video later today.

    Edit: It would be cool if there was a bunch of us working through the book together so if you've been thinking of buying the book do so now and join me on this exciting journey.

  39. #138

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    Hi!! Great forum. I got the book yesterday. Pretty exciting. Is anybody starting the book too? I am practicing chapter 2 now I hope to post videos too Let's see if doing this I am able to complete a guitar method book hehehe.

  40. #139

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    I'm not working through the book anymore per se, but Steve Herberman has me shedding what basically amounts to the connecting game every day, with a couple of differences:

    - Rather than focus on positions or shapes, instead, I think about note names and/or whether the note in question is the R, 3, 5 or 7. This gets me out of typical guitar "shape" territory and really solidifies my knowledge of the intervallic makeup of each arpeggio type.
    - I do not specifically working the 11 chord progressions, like Elliot has you doing; but instead just take various standards and jazz tunes and play through those changes. At first I stuck to "slow-moving" standards (like You Stepped Out Of A Dream), where there are only chord changes every bar or two. But lately, as I get better, I seek out difficult songs with lots of modulations and other weird harmonic devices (like Giant Steps; Ceora; Windows; Dolphin Dance; and a lot of ballads like Yesterdays or Body & Soul).

    It is a really steep learning curve and it is taking a long time, but I am seeing definite progress.

    The next thing I will be tasked with sort of extends the connecting game to include not only arpeggios, but scales. Essentially, a chord-scale approach to things. This is actually a lot harder for me, because there are more note choices, and you sometimes have to make executive decisions about the underlying scale based on the beat you're playing on and whatever scale degree you're on. You need to suggest the underlying scale so for instance, starting a major scale on the 4th scale degree doesn't quite sound right, so either you repeat a note and play the third (assuming you're ascending), or skip the 4th and play the 5th. (Or, sharp the 4th for a Lydian sound!)

    After I get more facility in the scales, I will be combine the two approaches, with rhythmic variety and some substitutions and alterations, and the result starts really sounding like an actual jazz solo.

  41. #140

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzCladdagh View Post
    Hi!! Great forum. I got the book yesterday. Pretty exciting. Is anybody starting the book too? I am practicing chapter 2 now I hope to post videos too Let's see if doing this I am able to complete a guitar method book hehehe.
    I play lead guitar in a classic rock cover band but have finally decided to really learn jazz guitar. I played trumpet in high school and loved jazz band the best and have always listened to jazz music, but found the idea of learning jazz guitar overwhelming.

    So I've started Mickey Baker Vol. 1 and I've decided to add this Joe Elliott book to my practice routine as well. My book is still in the mail, but I've already memorized the pattern 1 arps and am running through them a bit every day to get them under my fingers. I think I'll start working on pattern 4 next.

    I would like to give a special thanks to fep for all he has done for both the Joe Elliott and Mickey Baker material. I have enjoyed watching your videos and using your backing tracks on Mickey Baker.

    I would like to add that I was a ways into "Chord Tone Soling" by Barrett Tagliarino before deciding to switch to this Joe Elliott book. It looks like they are similar in many ways, but this one is jazz-specific which better suits my goals at this point. Barrett's book is great though and has really improved my playing.

    Okay, I'm off to arpeggio hell...

  42. #141

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    Don't you mean "arpeggio heaven?"

  43. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    Don't you mean "arpeggio heaven?"
    Ask me again in a few weeks.

  44. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    I'm not working through the book anymore per se, but Steve Herberman has me shedding what basically amounts to the connecting game every day, with a couple of differences:

    - Rather than focus on positions or shapes, instead, I think about note names and/or whether the note in question is the R, 3, 5 or 7. This gets me out of typical guitar "shape" territory and really solidifies my knowledge of the intervallic makeup of each arpeggio type.
    - I do not specifically working the 11 chord progressions, like Elliot has you doing; but instead just take various standards and jazz tunes and play through those changes. At first I stuck to "slow-moving" standards (like You Stepped Out Of A Dream), where there are only chord changes every bar or two. But lately, as I get better, I seek out difficult songs with lots of modulations and other weird harmonic devices (like Giant Steps; Ceora; Windows; Dolphin Dance; and a lot of ballads like Yesterdays or Body & Soul).

    It is a really steep learning curve and it is taking a long time, but I am seeing definite progress.

    The next thing I will be tasked with sort of extends the connecting game to include not only arpeggios, but scales. Essentially, a chord-scale approach to things. This is actually a lot harder for me, because there are more note choices, and you sometimes have to make executive decisions about the underlying scale based on the beat you're playing on and whatever scale degree you're on. You need to suggest the underlying scale so for instance, starting a major scale on the 4th scale degree doesn't quite sound right, so either you repeat a note and play the third (assuming you're ascending), or skip the 4th and play the 5th. (Or, sharp the 4th for a Lydian sound!)

    After I get more facility in the scales, I will be combine the two approaches, with rhythmic variety and some substitutions and alterations, and the result starts really sounding like an actual jazz solo.
    Not to derail the thread, but I checked out Steve's sight after reading your post. Sounds intriguing, although I am sticking to using this book to guide.

    Thanks for the tip.

  45. #144

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    I got my book in the mail a few days ago and I can see this is exactly what I've been looking for. I've read through most of the book already and have had light bulbs going off left and right in my head as gaps in my knowledge were filled or concepts that I vaguely understood were explained simply and clearly. Getting this stuff into my fingers is another matter and I can see how this could easily take me two years or more to get through. But that's fine, I hopefully have many years ahead of me.

    I now have patterns I maj., II min., and III maj. memorized. I think I'll get pattern IV min. down then stop learning new patterns for a while. I've been working on the connecting game with situation 1 for the last few days and it's coming along more quickly than I expected, but it was a real brain-buster at first.

    One challenge I had was figuring out what fingering to use on pattern III maj. with the position shifts. I found a website that shows fingerings for the arpeggios and some I used but others seemed uncomfortable to me so I chose a different fingering. Is there a standard accepted fingering method for these arpeggios with position shifts? I assume everybody does whatever works best for them as I have now done. But as a beginner to this style, I can't clearly see what's ahead and I don't want to choose a fingering method that's going to make things more difficult for me later on.

  46. #145

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    No, as far as I know there are no accepted fingerings. Some people prefer shifting, some prefer stretching. For me it depends - I sometimes prefer one, sometimes the other. I guess it is a good idea to have both available.

    Enjoy practice!

  47. #146

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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankLearns View Post
    No, as far as I know there are no accepted fingerings. Some people prefer shifting, some prefer stretching. For me it depends - I sometimes prefer one, sometimes the other. I guess it is a good idea to have both available.

    Thanks for the response, it confirms what I had guessed. I know that on the piano I think about what key I want to hit, not which finger I'm hitting it with. But practicing the "correct" fingering patterns in the beginning gave me good habits even though I'll often play a line where I have to break those rules. And I suppose that will become the case on the guitar as I get more fluent at this style. But at this stage I definitely need to set up a rigid fingering system for myself when playing these arpeggios.

  48. #147

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    Ok guys I've just received the book and I've began to work on it.

    My background is as follows : I started out by using a key center approach, then ditched it completely to base my improvisations on arpeggios only, with chord shapes as a basis. I really love that approach because for each shape I use, I know where all the chord tones are and I can alter them easily. But I have to move around a lot when I do this so it's not optimal.

    Now what is presented in this book is kind of weird for me because I must go back to visualize the key centers like when I first started out *but* think in terms of arpeggios.

    So when I practice the arpeggios, should I make an effort to know what are the exact chord tones I'm playing (knowing where is the 3rd, the 5th and the 7th for each one of them) ? This looks like a real headache because even though I'm playing in one single pattern, the position of the chord tones is always different : the root of one arpeggio for example is in the same place as the third of another one.

    Oh and another question concerning the strict alternate picking : do you really think this is important ? There are several melodies that require you to sweep 3 or 4 strings and they are impossible to play with alternate picking, so why do we need to be strictly using alternate picking ? Or maybe this is one of those "do it like that in the beginning then ditch it" things ?

    Note that I'm not being judgmental about the method here, I just want to understand.
    Last edited by Nabil B; 05-12-2013 at 05:11 PM.

  49. #148

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    Cool PJ, I'm glad you are posting with this group.

    I can't remember if the author said to know the scale degrees of the arpeggios but I think it's real useful if you do.

    The alternate picking is really for those that haven't already developed the technique. It's really not what the course is about. I believe there is a post somewhere where someone wrote to the author regarding the alternate picking, it's not important. I believe the alternate picking was designed to help students feel the eighth notes and feel the 8 notes to a bar more easily.

    I just watched the youtube video I posted above, I'm not using alternate picking on that one. It looks to be economy picking.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  50. #149

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    Observation:

    I use the Musician's Institute fingering pattern for the Major Scale, which is broken down into 5 patterns.

    These patterns also correspond to five arpeggio patterns that MI came up with for each position.

    I have found it challenging to make all of the arpeggios generated for each position fit into the original major scale pattern.

    In fact, quite often the arpeggios based on different degrees do not fit inside the original major scale pattern as nicely as they do for major scale pattern 1.

    I have had to create my own arpeggio patterns.

  51. #150

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    Hey There,
    Not sure if this is still an open thread, but I have a question...

    Chapter 3: Organizing Minor Arpeggios. Why is the V7 arpeggio different from the IIImi7 Arpeggio from the major arpeggio harmonization. The minor scale patterns follows everything else exactly except the V7. The V7 fingering they show looks like a V7 arpeggio from Pattern 3, except the notes they are playing on the B and E strings are different (is this a mistake?). Anyhow, any help will greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!