Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 26 to 44 of 44
  1. #26

    User Info Menu

    Classic quote by Bream in the book ‘A life on the road’.

    Apparently when he began to popularise the lute, a lot of purists started criticising his playing style, the construction of his lute, his use of nails, dynamics, tone colour etc.

    Says Bream: “I ask you! I mean, here I was playing music that almost no-one had heard for nearly three hundred years, and suddenly out of the woodwork came all these clever-dicks who knew so much more than I did!”

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

    User Info Menu

    Yes, but...he gives the impression he was the first to do it, where in fact there had been a long line of lute players before him dating back to Dolmetsch at the turn of the century, and many of them - including luthiers) were indeed clever dicks who had studied the history of the instrument. Then along comes this young arrogant classical guitarist, using metal frets and a guitar bridge, and playing with a rest-stroke technique with nails - they were entitled to say this was not how it was done historically. However, no one, to my knowledge, criticised his playing or musicianship. His use of the term "clever dicks" could only inflame passions on both sides.

    But Bream developed his playing style and instruments. Here is a webpage detailing his lutes over the decades: Lutes - by the end he is playing a "proper" lute. His relationship with lute players has improved to one of deep mutual respect, as should be the case.

  4. #28

    User Info Menu

    Is there anyone who tried to play jazz on the lute?

  5. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Yes, but...he gives the impression he was the first to do it, where in fact there had been a long line of lute players before him dating back to Dolmetsch at the turn of the century, and many of them - including luthiers) were indeed clever dicks who had studied the history of the instrument. Then along comes this young arrogant classical guitarist, using metal frets and a guitar bridge, and playing with a rest-stroke technique with nails - they were entitled to say this was not how it was done historically. However, no one, to my knowledge, criticised his playing or musicianship. His use of the term "clever dicks" could only inflame passions on both sides.

    But Bream developed his playing style and instruments. Here is a webpage detailing his lutes over the decades: Lutes - by the end he is playing a "proper" lute. His relationship with lute players has improved to one of deep mutual respect, as should be the case.
    Yes but he was out there putting it in front of the wider public in concerts and selling records of lute music, I don’t think any one else was popularising it like he did at that stage.

    I like the fact that Bream was a real character, colourful language and all.

  6. #30

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Is there anyone who tried to play jazz on the lute?
    i did. I conclude the experiment was a failure haha

  7. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Yes but he was out there putting it in front of the wider public in concerts and selling records of lute music, I don’t think any one else was popularising it like he did at that stage.

    I like the fact that Bream was a real character, colourful language and all.
    J.Bream was my favorite classical guitar player.
    Often his interpretations of guitar music were broadcast on Polish Radio.

  8. #32

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    i did. I conclude the experiment was a failure haha
    The lute has a very pleasant sound.

  9. #33

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Is there anyone who tried to play jazz on the lute?
    You've resurrected a memory with this question!

    When I was a teen living in southern Connecticut, USA there was an Early Music program at a university. I participated in an ensemble class which was led by Joseph Iadone. Too young to know the tune at the time, but I'm certain I heard him play a standard on his lute one evening.

    Iadone was a gracious man who loved the music and didn't care what instrument we brought to class. I had my nylon strung guitar and I remember a flute player, oboe and a fellow with a Gretsch hollow-body.

  10. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Is there anyone who tried to play jazz on the lute?
    I know that German jazz guitarist Peter Autschbach has a lute, but I don‘t know whether he ever played it in public.

    There is a lute player doing stuff with loopers etc., if that qualifies as jazz. I think he is called Jozef van Wissem.

    Anuoar Brahem plays jazz on an oud.

    And there is always Sting...


    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  11. #35

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve
    I know that German jazz guitarist Peter Autschbach has a lute, but I don‘t know whether he ever played it in public.




  12. #36

    User Info Menu

    Very interesting...but the sound.Piezo pickup and lute...?

  13. #37

    User Info Menu

    I met Martin Taylor many years ago when he came to Napier University for a lunchtime recital, and I was one of two lecturers in guitar there at the time - some 30 years ago. We got chatting about his right hand being similar a certain lute technique, and I demonstrated on a lute. He started playing me a little, by suggesting he could "take the lute and play jazz on it, but why don't you do it? You be that guy". I didn't become that guy...

  14. #38

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Yes but he was out there putting it in front of the wider public in concerts and selling records of lute music, I don’t think any one else was popularising it like he did at that stage.
    Popularising it does not equate with being correct in what you say and do...

    ...but don't get me wrong. I love the guy. He is my favourite classical guitar player, even though I don't always like everything he did, and loved the fact that he was a character.

  15. #39

    User Info Menu

    I found a quote I was looking for.

    "Without a beautiful sound, the charm of the guitar disappears".

    I know it's fashionable in some circles to be harshly critical of the guy, but what Segovia said there resonates with me. The tone of one note can capture my heart. A clever bebop line will tickle my brain, but the visceral response to tone is something altogether different.

    Good results can be achieved with nail, flesh or flatpick. In all cases it takes time and intent to learn to produce that charming sound.

  16. #40

    User Info Menu

    Segovia - because none of us can spend half the day having a bath and still sound that good.

  17. #41

    User Info Menu

    TBF the bath is immaterial. ‘My hours are not like your hours.’

  18. #42

    User Info Menu

    Andres Segovia-the Master!!!!!!!!!!!

  19. #43

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Segovia - because none of us can spend half the day having a bath and still sound that good.
    Have you given it an honest try, Christian?

  20. #44

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky
    Have you given it an honest try, Christian?
    i see the flaw in my logic

    Ha would be nice to be in a position to try that