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  1. #1

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    I have seen a lot of fast players using the rounded side of the pick. George Lynch comes to mind. I tried it a few times, but it did not work for me.

    A recent thread ( I can't find it) brought the subject up again. After years of trying to use the tip, I gave in and tried to use the side of the pick again only this time, I laid out all of my picks and used the one that had the best rounded point on the side. That pick turned out to be Black Dunlop Jazz III. Compared to its red brother, and the Ultex picks, there is a discernable point on it that you can exploit.

    I have made the switch and will probably not be looking back. Like those fast players I see on Youtube, I made the change. No more having the point get caught in the strings. I am sorry Pat Martino, but I give up trying to duplicate the presicion with which you use the pointed side of the tip.

    It has helped my both in strumming and in single-note runs. Hallelujah!!

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  3. #2

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    It's all about the release.

  4. #3

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    For the curious, I am using what I think is called the Dunlop Jazz III Stiffo pick. It is black. I ordered a bag yesterday and am hoping I got the right pick model.

    The only drawback for me is string skipping and inside picking. Having an extended tip really helps with executing those functions.

  5. #4

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    I agree that using the rounded edge of a standard-size pick helps with speed. Not being a particularly fast picker myself (irrespective of the plectrum side used), I tend to reach for slightly thicker pics to thicken my tone. For me, note precision and tone is more important than speed.

  6. #5

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    I can play equally fast with in any decently thick pick with pretty much any shape. The main question is whether or not I like the transients.

    ATM I like the jazz III shape but bigger

  7. #6

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    i think cecil alexander uses the round side.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    i think cecil alexander uses the round side.
    My understanding is that Steve Ray Vaughn, Pat Metheny, George Lynch, Eric Johnson, Steve Morse, Scott Henderson, Robbin Ford, Bireli Lagrene, Henry Robinett, Larry Carlton, and Michael Schenker all use the rounded edges. They are all very fluid players who can play very, very fast when they want to. All with superior technical abilities so I need not look any further for a reason to adopt this method.

    Here is an old thread that discussed this technique:
    Using the curvy part of the pick.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    My understanding is that Steve Ray Vaughn, Pat Metheny, George Lynch, Eric Johnson, Steve Morse, Scott Henderson, Robbin Ford, Bireli Lagrene, Henry Robinett, Larry Carlton, and Michael Schenker all use the rounded edges. They are all very fluid players who can play very, very fast when they want to. All with superior technical abilities so I need not look any further for a reason to adopt this method.

    Here is an old thread that discussed this technique:
    Using the curvy part of the pick.
    I could quote an equally large number of players that used the pointed end

    I’m not sure using the rounded end will necessarily give you better speed/agility of itself. If you already have solid technique and like the sound and feel, that’s a separate thing.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I could quote an equally large number of players that used the pointed end

    I’m not sure using the rounded end will necessarily give you better speed/agility of itself. If you already have solid technique and like the sound and feel, that’s a separate thing.
    In my case, I noticed an immediate increase in speed and I also feel the pick gliding through the strings while strumming. So it has been a shortcut, or at the very least, a shortcut to overcoming my obviously flawed technique when using the pointed end of the pick.

  11. #10

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    The Jazz iii has a very distinct sound due to it's point, but unlike a regular sized dunlop it protrudes less which combines to make it one of the most popular picks among many types of players, but especially rock players.

    In jazz I know players that prefer jazz ii or even jazz i pick that has a much rounder point.


    playing with the round edge of a jazz iii makes no sense to me .. I much prefer play with the round side a regular sized dunlop and have something to hold on to instead of that pesky small jazz iii pick? (Just a suggestion )

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    The Jazz iii has a very distinct sound due to it's point, but unlike a regular sized dunlop it protrudes less which combines to make it one of the most popular picks among many types of players, but especially rock players.

    In jazz I know players that prefer jazz ii or even jazz i pick that has a much rounder point.


    playing with the round edge of a jazz iii makes no sense to me .. I much prefer play with the round side a regular sized dunlop and have something to hold on to instead of that pesky small jazz iii pick? (Just a suggestion )
    Using the side of the pick gave me the same experience as when I bought this $100.00 Blue Chip pick. I just started slipping and sliding on the strings. But, while that pick was shaped like the Jazz III, the tip was a little too thick and did not taper down.

    Now, getting to what you mentioned, when I grip the tip with the point part pointing at the bridge, I have that huge flat surface across the shoulder of the pick to grip. I am so pleased with the outcome. If only I could find one with just a slight bit more pointy shoulder, then it would be just about perfect.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    In my case, I noticed an immediate increase in speed and I also feel the pick gliding through the strings while strumming. So it has been a shortcut, or at the very least, a shortcut to overcoming my obviously flawed technique when using the pointed end of the pick.
    Cool!

  14. #13

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    When I use a pick it's always been with the shoulders, otherwise it's thumb and first two fingers, but I'm only 69
    Last edited by BFrench; 01-08-2021 at 02:15 PM. Reason: spelling