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  1. #1

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    Not through lack of trying, I understand the importance of regular practice and so please trust me when I say I've been putting the hours in here!


    I can create the harmonic sound, but it's rather pathetic.


    Checklist:


    - Apply plenty of gain
    - Apply vibrato to the note
    - Minimal pick showing
    - Angled thumb to brush the string immediately after the pick
    - Try different frets on different strings
    - Experiment where I'm picking in relation to the bridge.


    I feel like I know all the theory behind them... just can't really get them. (((even just sitting and hitting the strings in any way I can imagine has not once produced a proper sounding one)))


    I use Guitar Rig 5 - Is there a setting/control that could be killing them??


    Unfortunately I don't own a real amp, so I can't determine if they'd be sounding good on one.


    Generally - Is this a technique that requires a lot of work, or should they be relatively easy?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimjanee
    Not through lack of trying, I understand the importance of regular practice and so please trust me when I say I've been putting the hours in here!


    I can create the harmonic sound, but it's rather pathetic.


    Checklist:


    - Apply plenty of gain
    - Apply vibrato to the note
    - Minimal pick showing
    - Angled thumb to brush the string immediately after the pick
    - Try different frets on different strings
    - Experiment where I'm picking in relation to the bridge.


    I feel like I know all the theory behind them... just can't really get them. (((even just sitting and hitting the strings in any way I can imagine has not once produced a proper sounding one)))


    I use Guitar Rig 5 - Is there a setting/control that could be killing them??


    Unfortunately I don't own a real amp, so I can't determine if they'd be sounding good on one.


    Generally - Is this a technique that requires a lot of work, or should they be relatively easy?
    Buddy, I don't think you are on the right forum to ask a question like that lol. Jazz guitarists don't usually use pinch harmonics, because they don't usually use high gain tones, or use the bridge pickups at all, if their guitars even have one.

    But I do for fun sometimes, and I don't recall a lot of efforts required to master them, they kinds just happen... I can't think of anything that not on your list already. Maybe post a video how you do it?

  4. #3

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    Don't use this technique but I do watch Rob Scallon's videos and this one from a number of years back may help.


  5. #4

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    You need a pointier guitar. The pointier the guitar the more squealies.

    this is verified by empirical evidence. Rounded guitars rarely produce squealies.

    except Billy Gibbons. But maybe it’s the facial hair?

    Hope that helps.

  6. #5

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    In seriousness, it’s a knack. I always let the string sproing off the pick and go into my thumb. I’ve seen others do it differently.

    Even if you don’t get a full on squealer, being able to shape the tone with your thumb in this way can help you produce very vocal sounding semi harmonics... can actually be quite subtle.

    But if you want Dimebag style squealies it’s all about learning where the nodes are. And giving it plenty of welly.

    Anyway I haven’t done one since 1997 so take this with a pinch of salt.

  7. #6

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    IIRC Tal Farlow was great at artificial harmonics. He was a great squiggler and wiggler too, hence the nickname octopus.


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  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    In seriousness, it’s a knack. I always let the string sproing off the pick and go into my thumb. I’ve seen others do it differently.

    Even if you don’t get a full on squealer, being able to shape the tone with your thumb in this way can help you produce very vocal sounding semi harmonics... can actually be quite subtle.

    But if you want Dimebag style squealies it’s all about learning where the nodes are. And giving it plenty of welly.

    Anyway I haven’t done one since 1997 so take this with a pinch of salt.
    For me Zakk Wylde is da man when it comes to pinch harmonics. Listen to his albums with Ozzy, he gets the most consistent squealies of them all. Like no random stuff, right on the money. I think EVH and RR were the pioneers of that?

    And yes, pointy guitars is a must. But if you can get them squealies on archtop with only neck pickup though- you will make the history.

  9. #8

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    Start with the easy ones. Fret the 12th fret imagine a 24th fret and strum/mute there. Then imagine a 36th fret and move your right hand there.

    Get it with one note, if you want a strong harmonic pick an octive above it. This is basically a party trick, once can do it, you'll forget it was ever tricky.

    Metal zone overdrive or a fuzz box will help.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimjanee
    Not through lack of trying, I understand the importance of regular practice and so please trust me when I say I've been putting the hours in here!


    I can create the harmonic sound, but it's rather pathetic.


    Checklist:


    - Apply plenty of gain
    - Apply vibrato to the note
    - Minimal pick showing
    - Angled thumb to brush the string immediately after the pick
    - Try different frets on different strings
    - Experiment where I'm picking in relation to the bridge.


    I feel like I know all the theory behind them... just can't really get them. (((even just sitting and hitting the strings in any way I can imagine has not once produced a proper sounding one)))


    I use Guitar Rig 5 - Is there a setting/control that could be killing them??


    Unfortunately I don't own a real amp, so I can't determine if they'd be sounding good on one.


    Generally - Is this a technique that requires a lot of work, or should they be relatively easy?

  11. #10

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    If possible, get a little space between the pick point and the part of your thumb that will be grazing the already-vibrating string creating a new node and hence the harmonic. I try to make the contact as close to the thumb knuckle as possible and when I was doing those sorts of gigs developed a bit of a callus there. So pick orientation is crucial, at least to my erstwhile method.

  12. #11

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    the one that got most of us ole boys into them...the hijinx start at the 2:30 mark

    rev billy- la grange

    light strings, light pick and lots of compression/gain



    cheers

  13. #12

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    Hi kimjanee

    I had posted this a while ago, might help you. It’s how Tal did/taught harmonics. As AllenAllen says once you get the hang of it, it’s actually easy. The video above explains the bridge pickup advantage, thank you zdub!

    I don’t think I explained this well in my post: we didn’t keep the pick like the video guy does. Tal caused the harmonic by moving the pick to between thumb and middle finger. The index finger extends out to cause the harmonic by lightly touching the string as it’s struck with the pick. That pointing index finger was used to point to the ‘markers’ mentioned below.

    FWIW his harmonic solo on My Romance is a killer.

    good luck!
    d

    You treat the area of strings from the neck end to the back of the neck pup like its own little fingerboard using the neck, pup screws, and pup end as markers. They are markers to sync to the fretboard from the 12th fret on up. It’s actually pretty easy once you get the hang of it as youre fretting with your left hand and then you are syncing the movements of your right hand in the same pattern. If that makes sense)? Of course it requires moving the pick from thumb/index to thumb/middle and the index becomes the harmonic ‘producer’.
    Also, he switched to the bridge pickup. For what ever reason it produces a clearer harmonic than the neck pup. Hence he liked the “second prototype” compared to the true TF model cause the switch was easier to grab. He was used to the rotary switch on the 350.