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  1. #1

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    Is this chord possible/practical to play as written? Is there another voicing that would be considerably easier? Basically it's F# major over C/G.
    Thank you!
    Attached Images Attached Images Is this chord possible/practical?-chd-jpg 

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    x.10.10.11.11.14

    x G C F# A# F#
    Last edited by ragman1; 05-30-2020 at 05:55 AM.

  4. #3

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    I would say yes, practical in the register it is written but for many of us with modest hand/finger size, there is an elastic limit of how far down the
    fingerboard we can gracefully access these intervals.

  5. #4

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    3xx312 nails the sound to my ear, more or less, and isn't hard to play. Gives a lower octave option.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 05-30-2020 at 05:29 AM.

  6. #5

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    6 x 8 5 7 x
    x 1 x 3 1 2

  7. #6

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    Another possible approach to address a triad over triad scenario is by using
    sequential voicings when the harmonic rhythm of a song allows for it.
    Six note voicings on guitar are limited to achievable shapes.

    F#
    CG C# F# A# X X ..... X C F# A# C# X ...... X X E A# C# F# ..... X X G C# F# A#

    or with 2 from each triad

    G C F# A# X X ...... X C E A# C# X ..... X E G C# F# X ..... X X G C F# A#

    spread triads

    G X E A# X F# ....... X C G C# X A# ....... X E X C F# C#

    While guitar is far more limited to fully articulate polytonal chords than piano,
    we have many workaround options available.
    Last edited by bako; 05-30-2020 at 09:14 AM.

  8. #7

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    where is the image from?

  9. #8

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    yea... just as written, just somewhat sucks. That voicing generally on guitar is a Blue Note chord... Eb13#9 or more in the direction of Eb7 with a blue note... the #9

    I use to use
    X X 5 6 7 6 a lot back in the 60's and even into the 70's .... Jazz blues thing Eb7#9 or Eb6#9. Helped with that Imin. thing to help imply.... a I7 to IV7 also imply the II-7 V7 thing.
    So Eb7 to Ab7 also becomes Eb-7 to Ab7.

    F#/C/G.... really some kind of G-7b5 reference?

  10. #9

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    As written, it's a Gm/M11 with the F# doubled up on the top.

    Just the usual Gm11

    x.10.10.10.11. x

    With the maj7 (F#) in it

    x.10.10.11.11. x

    Plus the octave F# on top

    x.10.10.11.11.14

    But it could be other things too, like most voicings.

  11. #10
    Thanks everyone for your input!

    -marvin: it was a screen print from Sibelius.

  12. #11

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    Yea... sorry I missed a note... thought the Doubled F# was D#. Anyway So G C F# and A#

    I hear as reference of something fro G melodic Min. C9#11 or F#7altered. or just somewhat different voicing of... G- ma7.

    Without a reference, there are lots of possibilities as bako posted... the actual voicing is very guitar friendly

    Sorry for the above post... I was thinking you were getting into that hip late 60's and early 70's sound. Obviously totally different direction.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ll00l0l
    Thanks everyone for your input!

    -marvin: it was a screen print from Sibelius.
    You mean the composer? Wow!

    It doesn't tell us the context. What was the chord about? What was the piece of music?

  14. #13

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    One more...
    If played as a chord (all strings plucked simultaneously) then the open G string can help.
    It's fingered in the middle of the neck and not too hard.

    8 9 8 0 7 x

    C F# A# G F#

  15. #14

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    And, of course, if you're playing in a band, and it's supposed to be a Gm chord, then, apart from the root, all you have left is a simple triad - C, Bb and F#. The bass, keyboard, or other guitar can play the root G and you can play the triad wherever you like, in a cluster or spread between strings.

    Or, if you're playing solo, there's no need to play all the notes in the chord. It depends on the arrangement, how you want it to sound, and so on.

    But we're probably going too far now.