Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 28 of 28
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    It is impossible to keep up with announcements on social media. As a result, I missed this live stream yesterday. There is a replay available for those interested.

    Anyone catch it?

    Guitar.Study Town Hall with Julian Lage - Crowdcast

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I watched it. I thought it was excellent and Julian was thoughtful as always.

    Not to spoil anything, but there MAY be a cameo by Tim Lerch....

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    And I MAY have found out about it after the fact via Tim Lerch.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    It‘s on Youtube now, just watched it. What a nice guy, and a lot of interesting input. Live and unedited, so a bit rambling at times.


    Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    It’s on YouTube? It looks like you have to pay to even watch the replay on their site. Is there now a legit, free link?

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by GregMath
    It’s on YouTube? It looks like you have to pay to even watch the replay on their site. Is there now a legit, free link?
    Youtube version has been taken down again ... So apparently not quite legit

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Glad it was taken down. Money raised is for charity and it's only $15.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I watched it and found it very interesting, maybe a bit esoteric for some folks. One guy wrote in the comment section "Dude, WTF, are you talking about?!"

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Really? It seemed like practical information to me. I thought it was great.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jaco
    I watched it and found it very interesting, maybe a bit esoteric for some folks. One guy wrote in the comment section "Dude, WTF, are you talking about?!"
    From my experience any deep and serious approach begins too look esoteric or hermetic to majority... the master creates its own world ... one should be eithe in or out.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Is it worth the $15 ?
    Did he have topics he wanted to discuss. Sometimes im a bit wary when acknowledged masters turn up to teach with nothing planned under the idea of "lets keep it open". Then you start getting the 'what gauge strings do you use", 'who cuts your hair", etc type of questions.
    Lazy teaching in my book.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzism
    Is it worth the $15 ?
    Did he have topics he wanted to discuss. Sometimes im a bit wary when acknowledged masters turn up to teach with nothing planned under the idea of "lets keep it open". Then you start getting the 'what gauge strings do you use", 'who cuts your hair", etc type of questions.
    Lazy teaching in my book.
    I was in a few masterclasses but all were individual (but the group was there).
    In most cases even with the best players and teachers it depends on you, you should know wht you are after and have questions (excet when you are a total newbie maybe but then I am not sure the masterclass will help much). It is too short time for a teache to identify problems so the experienced teachers often dive into one of their' masterclass pattern' which can be a bit frustrating...

    There is old Julian's materclass on youtube and I like it --- it is not very systematic... he does not seel to have a plan or elaborated system... it is more about occasional topics... I thinkl thios will work well for advanced people who have good orientation but may be a problem for those who expect cionsequent teaching...
    Peter Bernstein's masterclasses also may seem frustrating to some - because he rather teaches you the process of working and stufying than just pointing out 'do this, do that

    I like tachers that lead you to the point that you do it... bit they.

    On the other hand... soemtimes strict directions are also needed.

    Recently there was Joe Lovano's masterclas for free (or donation) -- it was a bit funny... he mostly spoke about universe, energy and played free impros (sometimes beating a gong)))

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    I went to the Brecon jazz festival years ago, and one of the cheaper ticket options was to go and watch Joe Lovano rehearsing his UK pickup band in the afternoon, ahead of his evening concert (it was a one-off UK gig and Joe was playing his own tunes which were quite complex). Not many people bothered to go to it, so I was near the front with a good view.

    It was really interesting to see how he worked over tiny details of the tunes with the group. Joe also took the trouble to explain a lot of what he was doing to us (the audience), answered our questions etc.

    In some ways I enjoyed it more than his actual concert later on!

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Masterclasses are not tutorials. They are unscripted and driven by what the participants bring. Often participants must audition for a spot and if selected be prepared to receive dogma from the master. At least, that's how I remember them from my conservatory days. As a member of the audience, without some experience and level of accomplishment on your instrument it's unlikely you would get anything of benefit from a masterclass. So better to keep your $15 for something else maybe.

    There's an old video on YT of then student Michael Chapdelaine getting his head handed to him by Andres Segovia.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    I like tachers that lead you to the point that you do it... bit they.

    On the other hand... soemtimes strict directions are also needed.

    Recently there was Joe Lovano's masterclas for free (or donation) -- it was a bit funny... he mostly spoke about universe, energy and played free impros (sometimes beating a gong)))
    Thx for the reply.
    Yeah, sometimes these activities are a bit hit or miss. The best experiences i have had are events that probable border on being called a workshop. So it wouldnt just be people talking or lecturing the whole time. There would be a variety of activities including interactive and experiential opportunities to learn things. I had an opportunity for example to play duo with Kreisberg and later with his rhythm section. It felt much more meaningful and special to experience what its like to play with very high level players, rather than just listening to someone talking the whole time. In this case not being there physically, perhaps some handouts could be made available, again to cater to different learner situations. Some people might be more visual learners so concepts could be understood more clearly by reading something and then trying it out. Just my 0.2c
    Cheers!

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Alright, so since I actually watched the masterclass, maybe I can set a few things straight.


    First of all, there was very little playing involved. Julian talked about, or touched upon, quite a wide range of subjects. A large part was about practising, playing, and finding the right mindset to play and practice. I think that was the part that came across as the most humane, because he was talking about his own experience and his own practice routines. Whether or not this will help you in your everyday playing, is entirely up to you.


    Then there were a couple of people who called in. The first one didn't make the connection, which was a bit awkward. The others asked about chord substitutions, Alexander technique, and what goes on in your head when you improvise. The last question was asked by Tim Lerch, who is himself a master player, so that was quite interesting.



    If I had to sum it up, I'd say that it was a bit rambling, but no less enjoyable for that. I had a feeling that it was quite in tune with Julian's playing, which towards the end he described as something like "striving for the colloquial, speaking slang, not necessarily telling a story".


    If it's worth $15 for you, I don't know. I confess it was not worth $15 for me, that's why I sought it out on YouTube first. Anyway, you can still make a donation and get the masterclass thrown in for free – how about that?

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky
    So better to keep your $15 for something else maybe.
    Thx, for the tip. Ive just enrolled in the Dave Allen Odd/Mixed meter masterclass hes doing tues night. He's including study materials.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve
    Alright, so since I actually watched the masterclass, maybe I can set a few things straight.

    First of all, there was very little playing involved. Julian talked about, or touched upon, quite a wide range of subjects. A large part was about practising, playing, and finding the right mindset to play and practice. I think that was the part that came across as the most humane, because he was talking about his own experience and his own practice routines. Whether or not this will help you in your everyday playing, is entirely up to you.

    Then there were a couple of people who called in. The first one didn't make the connection, which was a bit awkward. The others asked about chord substitutions, Alexander technique, and what goes on in your head when you improvise. The last question was asked by Tim Lerch, who is himself a master player, so that was quite interesting.

    If I had to sum it up, I'd say that it was a bit rambling, but no less enjoyable for that. I had a feeling that it was quite in tune with Julian's playing, which towards the end he described as something like "striving for the colloquial, speaking slang, not necessarily telling a story".

    If it's worth $15 for you, I don't know. I confess it was not worth $15 for me, that's why I sought it out on YouTube first. Anyway, you can still make a donation and get the masterclass thrown in for free – how about that?
    Thx for the review.
    I am a fan of Lage, I saw him in Langnau last summer with Charles Lloyd and a few years back at the stone in NYC with Frisell.
    These days im making my living as a HS music teacher. Sometimes it occurs to me that with the amount of players having to teach, then perhaps there should be some effort made to consider in how they will present their thoughts with greater clarity. Teaching well is like playing well, it does require some time investment so you can get better at it. Not saying its the case here, but their was a recent youtube teacher thread on here and it was shown that there was a wide variety in the quality of presentation. Just turning on the camera and rambling on for 20 min is probably not going to be everyones cup of tea.
    Cheers

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    I went to the Brecon jazz festival years ago, and one of the cheaper ticket options was to go and watch Joe Lovano rehearsing his UK pickup band in the afternoon, ahead of his evening concert (it was a one-off UK gig and Joe was playing his own tunes which were quite complex). Not many people bothered to go to it, so I was near the front with a good view.

    It was really interesting to see how he worked over tiny details of the tunes with the group. Joe also took the trouble to explain a lot of what he was doing to us (the audience), answered our questions etc.

    In some ways I enjoyed it more than his actual concert later on!
    Than Joe's online masterclass was also enjoyable, his personality is very charismatic, and that bit of crazyness has its charm... but it was more like another form of performance art)))

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Being a phenomenal player doesn't doesn't make you a great teacher for on-screen lessons. You need a solid lesson plan and the ability to relate to the camera. Witness the Tax Farlow video online - not a lot of useful teaching in my view. when I directed a few videos with the late John McGann, we worked hard on relating to the camera and John hit it out of the ballpark. He was a great guy and an amazing player across multiple genres from jazz to rock, bluegrass and Celtic music.





    Rhythm Tune-Up | Homespun

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jaco
    I watched it and found it very interesting, maybe a bit esoteric for some folks. One guy wrote in the comment section "Dude, WTF, are you talking about?!"
    the internet is full of people who feel they have a right to understand everything regardless of their level of accomplishment

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    the internet is full of people who feel they have a right to understand everything regardless of their level of accomplishment
    anyone does have a right to understand anything regardless of their level of accomplishment. (mostly they do not use it to be honest)

    ... deprivation of right to understand.... that must be something!

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    towards the end he described as something like "striving for the colloquial, speaking slang, not necessarily telling a story".

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    The way I've always looked at these lessons, classes, videos or a book whatever...if I take one idea from it that I can use it's a success. I got one or two.

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    anyone does have a right to understand anything regardless of their level of accomplishment. (mostly they do not use it to be honest)

    ... deprivation of right to understand.... that must be something!
    I suppose it depends how you think about the word 'right.'

    I do not think one should have an expectation. Let me put it that way.

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    I love Julian Lage and what he's done (and doing) for Jazz guitar, but I wouldn't call the Saturday streaming a Masterclass. I watched it and enjoyed it, but it was more of a talk in which he shared different aspects and experiences of his own life as a musician. He's a class act for sure!



    Cheers,
    Arnie..

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I suppose it depends how you think about the word 'right.'

    I do not think one should have an expectation. Let me put it that way.
    I always have great expectations... (

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Yesterday I was thinking of John McGann because I was looking for the metronome DVD and then your post came up. I think I sold the DVD a few years back. John was a great guy and excellent teacher and player. I attended a mandolin camp many years ago where he was a instructor and we got to jam a little bit. He was late to his class because he was hanging with Sam Bush and was clearly stoked about that..so his class turned into a jam.He was complimentary of my very rough Bb blues solo because he was just a nice guy. He loved his thermos of coffee. I used his lessons by mail service decades ago.He was also a regular contributor to the Mandolin Cafe forum always offering great tips and advice. He is missed.