Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    A few days ago the Solid Guitar Channel started with this series.
    There are 3 videos up until now.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Just promoting more illiterate and lazy guitar-owners. Van Eps wrote 4 volumes of instructional books, not a single TAB in any of them. But, he was a musician, not a lazy guitar-holder.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Yes, I sighed when I saw the Subject line and then the video. Now, I do use tabs for some non-jazz things, especially in different tunings, but anyone who wants to play jazz really does have to learn to read standard notation. However, after 30 years of teaching, I have to say that some people try and try, but never manage to read standard notation, some of them very intelligent people - they just cannot do it. In that case, I suppose tab might help, but they are not planning on becoming pro players. So, I repeat that anyone serious about jazz guitar should definitely not use tab.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Don't disagree about reading, however in the Mechanism's series, George uses various systems from standard to
    individually crafted to indicate the precise locations and fingerings intended. If tabs help convey the same content in
    a video format then I have no problem with that.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I think jazz guitarists should be able to read music.

    I think there is a place for chord grids. (Ted Greene used them relentlessly.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Still, this video presents the same 1st inversion C major triad scale one octave in 4 or 5 fingering variations.
    If not through tab in this video format, how then best to convey this variance. In standard notation,
    each variation would appear as the same event. Tab conveys location, George was even more specific,
    indicating exact fingering, his concerns included mechanics presented by making the same musical event
    changes with alternative fingerings.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    All the info you need is there on the original page.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I should add (almost forgot!) that I made 30 videos of exercises from that book, all collected here: GVEps – ArchtopGuitar.net

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Hey, for what it's worth, I don't think there's anything wrong with teaching the material in a way that's more accessible to everyone, especially if they're not already familiar with common triad fingerings / need guidance on how to progress through the scale in a non-horizontal way across the neck.

    Not everyone has the time to digest 4 volumes of GVEps, and if this provides a nice gateway into the material, I say go for it. Those who want to be literate and find the need/drive for it will do so. A youtube video won't stop them.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I think jazz guitarists should be able to read music.

    I think there is a place for chord grids. (Ted Greene used them relentlessly.)
    Yep..Ted used grids..I have many pages of his tear out sheets of grids.but he also had many songs written out in notation..in many keys..he could read piano treble and bass clefs thus his ability to play Bach stuff..
    so if you wanted he would write out the chords in notation..he was just amazing to watch..flips over his Tele and used the back of it as a desk top and begins writing out lessons in notation...
    play well ...
    wolf

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarketTomato View Post
    Hey, for what it's worth, I don't think there's anything wrong with teaching the material in a way that's more accessible to everyone, especially if they're not already familiar with common triad fingerings / need guidance on how to progress through the scale in a non-horizontal way across the neck.

    Not everyone has the time to digest 4 volumes of GVEps, and if this provides a nice gateway into the material, I say go for it. Those who want to be literate and find the need/drive for it will do so. A youtube video won't stop them.
    Actually, these videos are from his little 40-page book, "The George Van Eps Method for Guitar," not the massive 4 volume series. In the book he specifies particular fingerings for easy transition from chord to chord as Rob M. alluded to above.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen View Post
    Yep..Ted used grids..I have many pages of his tear out sheets of grids.but he also had many songs written out in notation..in many keys..he could read piano treble and bass clefs thus his ability to play Bach stuff..
    so if you wanted he would write out the chords in notation..he was just amazing to watch..flips over his Tele and used the back of it as a desk top and begins writing out lessons in notation...
    I have no doubt Ted knew all that. I think it's good to know all that. I also think the grids are a real benefit for guitarists because the fingerboard is a grid and we all have to learn it (one way or the other). Guitarists have to learn some simple things several different ways. (Simple triads vary depending on which string you start on and whether you want to play them on three strings or two. It helps to hang them together in your head visually.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Just promoting more illiterate and lazy guitar-owners. Van Eps wrote 4 volumes of instructional books, not a single TAB in any of them. But, he was a musician, not a lazy guitar-holder.
    George van Eps Method with Tabs just started on YT-91sn32q-jpg