1. #1

    User Info Menu

    there was that string damper thing that herb ellis and jim hall used to use (van eps invention i think)and many insist that you have to use your right hand palm to stop the loud pedal effecti'm pretty sure i've just discovered what the solution isi use benson picking - so my right palm is not going to be damping the strings near the bridgei love playing lines that move a long way - from low to high for exampleand i have been tormented by the loud pedal effect for a very long timethe solution is that you slightly touch the string you are leaving behind with a finger of your left hand (!!!!!!)this of course will not be news to some of the experienced guys and girls here - but its a revelation to meits yet another example of how awful classical technique is for jazz playingi used all four fingers of my left hand forever - until i finally realized that everything sounds better and more relaxed (and i can more smoothly and quickly) if i use only two fingers of my left hand as much as possible (see PB, WM, and DR!!!!) classical technique tells you that you have to press your fingers down onto the string from above as much as possible so that you don't touch any of the other strings when you fret your notesbut if you want to stop the strings you've left behind in ascending lines from misbehaving (and with an electric guitar you really do if only because of feedback issues) you have to fret in a 'lazy-arse' way so that you just touch the thicker string your leaving behind as you leave it behind and move on up to the thinner one....for my part - i just can't believe that after all this time playing there is such a massive technique issue that i'm only just appreciating. this involves a fundamental modification to fretting technique (which is a bit of a pain) - but my goodness the improvement in guitar-behaviour is very marked. (if you were playing lots of long ascending lines on the piano you would not want your foot on the loud pedal THE WHOLE TIME.)so boo to 'proper' technique(use two fingers of left hand and slur your way around - AND - let your fretting fingers dampen the string your leaving as you leave it....)(great example of someone who knows how to do this - P. Bernstein on 'I'm Old Fashioned' with Bill Charlap.....)

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    if anyone can help me with formatting i'd be grateful

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    You may need to use either hand to damp unwanted notes, as the situation requires. I certainly do this whether playing classical guitar or jazz (electric) guitar.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad View Post
    there was that string damper thing that herb ellis and jim hall used to use (van eps invention i think)and many insist that you have to use your right hand palm to stop the loud pedal effect

    i'm pretty sure i've just discovered what the solution isi use benson picking - so my right palm is not going to be damping the strings near the bridgei love playing lines that move a long way - from low to high for exampleand i have been tormented by the loud pedal effect for a very long time the solution is that you slightly touch the string you are leaving behind with a finger of your left hand (!!!!!!)

    this of course will not be news to some of the experienced guys and girls here - but its a revelation to me its yet another example of how awful classical technique is for jazz playing i used all four fingers of my left hand forever - until i finally realized that everything sounds better and more relaxed (and i can more smoothly and quickly) if i use only two fingers of my left hand as much as possible (see PB, WM, and DR!!!!) classical technique tells you that you have to press your fingers down onto the string from above as much as possible so that you don't touch any of the other strings when you fret your notes but if you want to stop the strings you've left behind in ascending lines from misbehaving (and with an electric guitar you really do if only because of feedback issues) you have to fret in a 'lazy-arse' way so that you just touch the thicker string your leaving behind as you leave it behind and move on up to the thinner one....

    for my part - i just can't believe that after all this time playing there is such a massive technique issue that i'm only just appreciating. this involves a fundamental modification to fretting technique (which is a bit of a pain) - but my goodness the improvement in guitar-behaviour is very marked. (if you were playing lots of long ascending lines on the piano you would not want your foot on the loud pedal THE WHOLE TIME.)

    so boo to 'proper' technique(use two fingers of left hand and slur your way around - AND - let your fretting fingers dampen the string your leaving as you leave it....)(great example of someone who knows how to do this - P. Bernstein on 'I'm Old Fashioned' with Bill Charlap.....)
    As somebody that transitioned from classical to metal as a teenager I learned my lesson the hard way the first time I stepped on a distortion pedal. Only way to keep things clean is by muting everywhere all the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad View Post
    if anyone can help me with formatting i'd be grateful
    Formatted a bit above. I guess you can copy


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I continuously mute all strings I don't want to sound, all the time, both chords and lines, using both hands. I never "learned it" as such; both my hands figured out how to do it by themselves and it is totally unconscious, instant, and comprehensive covering any and all possibilities needed. // To me, it feels like, yes; there is a discernible sense of placing the fingers with respect to the fingerboard and moving the pick with respect to the strings, but that is a very simple and schematic feeling. What is actually going on in both hands is a kind of mechanical acquired intelligence of logical spatial geometry with respect to the strings themselves so that when I send a request to my hands to finger and pick a note or chord the hands already mechanically anticipate and suppress the "negative image" of that request (the unwanted strings), that negative image invoking the automatic configuration of string touches from both hands that suppresses all but the "positive image" that I request. // This sounds complex, but it is the result of simply really listening to what I play. The ear hears and is a little annoyed at spurious undamped strings sounding, and that eventually provokes the hands to mechanically adjust all by themselves so as to suppress those sounds. The actual detailed physical movement and contact methods by which the fingers figure out what and how to do all this are way too complex to consciously study and learn to apply - but if you always actually really listen to what you play, your ears will naturally and directly train your hands how to do this (and many more wonderful things!).
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Left hand/ right hand muting is often neglected, to the detriment of the player. It's in the nature of the instrument that strings want to ring; it's up to us to teach them some manners.
    Best regards, k

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    i think people who play actual electric guitars - you know the type they use for rock and roll - may have a whole different thing going on here. i've never played a solid body guitar (except for that one awful gig with a prs thing) - so what you have to learn to play a guitar that is MEANT to feedback is totally unknown to me.my right hand is not going to be doing any muting - that's a direct result of the picking approach i've adopted.i'm glad to discover that although i've always tried to make sure i don't touch the strings i'm not fretting (with my left hand) it seems it won't be too hard to learn to let my fingers touch and dampen strings as i leave them behind on ascending lines.i grew up playing classical flute - and in that world matters to do with technique are solidly nailed down. in our world there is no meaningful consensus on technique - maybe less with archtop jazz technique than with solid body rock technique - who knows. i'm glad it all comes so naturally to you pauln!

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad View Post
    i think people who play actual electric guitars - you know the type they use for rock and roll - may have a whole different thing going on here. i've never played a solid body guitar (except for that one awful gig with a prs thing) - so what you have to learn to play a guitar that is MEANT to feedback is totally unknown to me.... i'm glad it all comes so naturally to you pauln!
    It wasn't because of feedback... my first guitar was a solid body and I taught myself to play the first six years without an amplifier - it really was all about listening.
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."