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  1. #1
    This study group is based on the book, Patterns for Jazz by Jerry Coker, Jimmy Casale, Gary Campbell and Jerry Greene.

    Post a "deadline version" video of any or all of the weekly patterns, by Sunday each week, following this schedule:

    June 2: pattern 37
    June 9: 38-40
    June 16: 41- 43
    June 23: 44-45
    June 30: 46-47


    Please, state the BPM you're using, which pattern(s) you're posting, and label the post "deadline version", (understanding that a more "final version" may take additional time etc). Please state whether you would like comments on your playing.

    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 05-29-2019 at 12:00 PM.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Is there a digital copy of this for purchase anywhere?

    Edit: you can get it from alfred
    White belt
    My Youtube

  4. #3
    Has anyone checked out the patterns beginning with number 38? These sequencing type patterns are something I really had a lot of trouble with when I was using CAGED fingerings. I'd be interested in other's thoughts.

    I did a lot of work with these type of patterns a couple years ago, working out of Bert Ligon's technique book. He uses four iterations instead of two, as in 38 and 39. Calls them cyclical quadruplets. These types of patterns are always thought of as just technical exercises or whatever - mostly pointless. But he views them as being pretty important. Once you start working on targeting patterns in jazz, you can see the value in these type of patterns. They're good ear training for basic targeting etc.

    Basically anything that goes "away and back" can be considered a targeting pattern, but these are even much more fundamental. you can view the first four notes as basically targeting that fourth note , which is played twice, "away and back". Ending with the would-be "root" on the '&' of the beat gives a nice "BE-bop" flavor to it.

    Just as important if not moreso, you can view the 5th note in the ascending pattern as the "target" and you get a really nice diatonic four-note approach, ending with an enclosure. When I made this connection the first time, it really demystified a lot of what is really involved with playing and wood shedding enclosures.

  5. #4

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    So I will not be pursuing this study project for about 2 month due to impending (and actual) travel plans, house guests, and work.

    I hope in August to jump back in and do some catching up, hopefully not abandoning it completely.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    So I will not be pursuing this study project for about 2 month due to impending (and actual) travel plans, house guests, and work.

    I hope in August to jump back in and do some catching up, hopefully not abandoning it completely.
    I know we'll be hearing from you, but we'll miss your posting clips. Best wishes on all of your summer travels.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Has anyone checked out the patterns beginning with number 38? These sequencing type patterns are something I really had a lot of trouble with when I was using CAGED fingerings. I'd be interested in other's thoughts.

    I did a lot of work with these type of patterns a couple years ago, working out of Bert Ligon's technique book. He uses four iterations instead of two, as in 38 and 39. Calls them cyclical quadruplets. These types of patterns are always thought of as just technical exercises or whatever - mostly pointless. But he views them as being pretty important. Once you start working on targeting patterns in jazz, you can see the value in these type of patterns. They're good ear training for basic targeting etc.

    Basically anything that goes "away and back" can be considered a targeting pattern, but these are even much more fundamental. you can view the first four notes as basically targeting that fourth note , which is played twice, "away and back". Ending with the would-be "root" on the '&' of the beat gives a nice "BE-bop" flavor to it.

    Just as important if not moreso, you can view the 5th note in the ascending pattern as the "target" and you get a really nice diatonic four-note approach, ending with an enclosure. When I made this connection the first time, it really demystified a lot of what is really involved with playing and wood shedding enclosures.



    Patterns 38 and 41 as well as 3rds I'm very familiar with from first learning scales. The others will probably give me some trouble. It will be interesting to look at these in the way you describe. I've never thought to break the sequence apart as a melodic cell. Doing that is in line with the Bergonzi material I've been working through as well as this material.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    Patterns 38 and 41 as well as 3rds I'm very familiar with from first learning scales. The others will probably give me some trouble. It will be interesting to look at these in the way you describe. I've never thought to break the sequence apart as a melodic cell. Doing that is in line with the Bergonzi material I've been working through as well as this material.

    .
    Is the Bergonzi his 1235 material?

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Is the Bergonzi his 1235 material?

    Yes. I've been sequencing the 24 permutations of that through major pentatonic on two string sets in all keys. I haven't gotten to where I'm working it through chord progressions yet.

    It looks like the next section of Pattern for Jazz is going to hit on the same material.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    Yes. I've been sequencing the 24 permutations of that through major pentatonic on two string sets in all keys. I haven't gotten to where I'm working it through chord progressions yet.

    It looks like the next section of Pattern for Jazz is going to hit on the same material.

    .
    Yeah. Definitely not as many permutations . Later, I think it's minor 1235's , whereas bergonzi has a separate variation for minor? 1345?

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Has anyone checked out the patterns beginning with number 38? These sequencing type patterns are something I really had a lot of trouble with when I was using CAGED fingerings. I'd be interested in other's thoughts.
    Just checking 'em out today. Yes, I've had some problems with patterns like that w/ CAGED fingerings. (Not all of CAGED, though: seems like three were fine but two, eh, not so much.) But now I'm working on 3 nps fingerings. Which is why I didn't do all the recent patterns as I would be using the same fingering for them all and that's just boring.

    Did do today's, though, #37. (See below. Waiting for it up get upload.)

    Looking forward to the next several. I've never done this sort of pattern playing w/ 3 nps fingerings. So that should do me some good. Also glad this group is still going strong. Thanks again, Matt, for getting it off the ground and keeping it afloat!

    Question re: 38-40. Ex are given in one key. We are to play them in all keys. Are we to record them in all keys too?
    Last edited by MarkRhodes; 06-02-2019 at 02:00 PM.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #11

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    Couple things. Recently started working on 3 nps major scale fingerings. Same fingering for everything here. Dull, I know, and that's why I didn't record all the other patterns of this type.

    But look forward to the next several (1321, etc).

    Also working on picking more from the wrist exclusively. I think it makes me more consistent. At least, that's the goal.


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Couple things. Recently started working on 3 nps major scale fingerings. Same fingering for everything here. Dull, I know, and that's why I didn't record all the other patterns of this type.
    Thanks for posting Mark. Have you seen Jens Larsen's video on three scale fingering types? It popped up in my feed yesterday. 3nps content there...
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 06-03-2019 at 05:41 PM.

  14. #13
    Here's my take on #37. 139bpm I think:

  15. #14

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    Winding up may with Pattern 37. Can't believe it's June already.

    I was originally going to shift around the positions compared to last week, but in doing so wound up playing the same ascending and descending patterns. To avoid that, I just used the same positions and reversed the direction of each pattern.


    Chromatic - 8th position






    Fourths - 7th position







    Seconds - 5th position






    Minor thirds - Starting each set of four from 7th position (I tacked a 3NPS ending on this one inspired by Mark's post this morning.)





    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Thanks for posting Mark. Have you seen Jens Larsen's video on there scale converting types? It popped up in my feed yesterday. 3nps content there...
    No, Matt, I don't think I have. I've seen several of Jens' videos but not that one.

    I've been working with Steve Crowell's approach. His fingerings are the common ones. (Our own Henry Robinett posted a Neck Diagrams version of his fingerings and they're the same.) What I like about Crowell's approach is how he links four arpeggio fingerings to each of the 7 fingerings.

    The arp fingerings start on either the 3rd finger or the pinky. (All of the 7 3 nps fingerings start on the index finger.)

    So for fingering one (starting on the root of, say, F) the four arpeggios that run easily across the strings are Am7 (low E root) Dm7 (A-string root) Gm7 (D-string root) C7 (G-string root) , in other words: iii, vi, ii, V.

    For fingering two (starting on the second degree of F) you would get BbM7 Em7b5 Am7 Dm7, in other words: IV, vii, iii, vi.

    In short, the cycle is I IV vii iii vi ii V and each fingering in the 3 nps system gives you 4 of those arpeggios in a convenient row.

    Like the rug in Lebowski, it really ties the room (the fingerboard) together. ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  17. #16

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    My take on 37. Not to musical, but any comments on technique or otherwise are welcome. When it comes to 3 nps stuff this dude abides.




  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    No, Matt, I don't think I have. I've seen several of Jens' videos but not that one.

    I've been working with Steve Crowell's approach. His fingerings are the common ones. (Our own Henry Robinett posted a Neck Diagrams version of his fingerings and they're the same.) What I like about Crowell's approach is how he links four arpeggio fingerings to each of the 7 fingerings.

    The arp fingerings start on either the 3rd finger or the pinky. (All of the 7 3 nps fingerings start on the index finger.)

    So for fingering one (starting on the root of, say, F) the four arpeggios that run easily across the strings are Am7 (low E root) Dm7 (A-string root) Gm7 (D-string root) C7 (G-string root) , in other words: iii, vi, ii, V.

    For fingering two (starting on the second degree of F) you would get BbM7 Em7b5 Am7 Dm7, in other words: IV, vii, iii, vi.

    In short, the cycle is I IV vii iii vi ii V and each fingering in the 3 nps system gives you 4 of those arpeggios in a convenient row.

    Like the rug in Lebowski, it really ties the room (the fingerboard) together. ;o)
    My quote should have said "three scale fingering types". Sorry. Very hasty with the swype keyboard on my smartphone there. Don't know how you made any sense of it. Ha.

  19. #18

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    Here's a chart of the fingerings I'll be using for the series of scale sequences. To me it doesn't make much sense to think in keys rather than fingerings for this type of stuff on the guitar if you already have your scales down. I decided to divide the shapes into three starting from each finger on the E, A and D strings.

    If it's not obvious, the naming convention I use is finger-string for the location of the tonic/chord root. So 1-E means tonic with the 1st finger on the E string. The x markings are notes that lie outside the basic shape in order to play the entire set of sequences.

    Scale Sequence Fingerings.pdf
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by ErikWasser View Post
    My take on 37. Not to musical, but any comments on technique or otherwise are welcome. When it comes to 3 nps stuff this dude abides.



    Looks and sounds great to me, Erik. I like the second angle. I think it might be cool to think of the headstock camera as covering the right hand and make sure that the left is covered by the other one. I find myself wanting to see the left from the front, but that's just my personal preference.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Looks and sounds great to me, Erik. I like the second angle. I think it might be cool to think of the headstock camera as covering the right hand and make sure that the left is covered by the other one. I find myself wanting to see the left from the front, but that's just my personal preference.
    I think you’re on to something, Matt. Thanks for the tip.
    I’m planning on starting to make video accompanying my students home work, and making these pattern videos is a great way to experiment.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    Here's a chart of the fingerings I'll be using for the series of scale sequences. To me it doesn't make much sense to think in keys rather than fingerings for this type of stuff on the guitar if you already have your scales down. I decided to divide the shapes into three starting from each finger on the E, A and D strings.

    If it's not obvious, the naming convention I use is finger-string for the location of the tonic/chord root. So 1-E means tonic with the 1st finger on the E string. The x markings are notes that lie outside the basic shape in order to play the entire set of sequences.
    Good stuff. Thanks.
    So far, I've just played the basic patterns in what you would call 1-A (starting on the C at the 3rd fret of the A string). Next, running through the cycle. Haven't decided which fingerings to use yet but I'll try to keep 'em all 3 nps if only because I'm working on those and this is a good way to start getting them down.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #22

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    Patterns for Jazz #37 - Deadline version. Comments welcome.
    (BTW, I know that the exercise is supposed to start on the descending line but it doesn't matter. At least not to me. )

    Last edited by jasaco; 06-04-2019 at 01:15 PM.

  24. #23

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    I'm looking for opinions on what makes sense as a demo for this next set of exercises. I can't imagine anybody is interested in watching me play through each drill in all twelve keys. One key takes approximately twelve seconds.

    I suppose a person could just do all of them in C and put them all in one video. Since I'm having to sync audio for each vid I do, I've avoided editing them together up to this point.

    Ideas?

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    I'm looking for opinions on what makes sense as a demo for this next set of exercises. I can't imagine anybody is interested in watching me play through each drill in all twelve keys. One key takes approximately twelve seconds.
    I was wondering that too.
    I don't think playing through each exercise in all 12 keys ON VIDEO is needed. Though one might play through each exercise in two or three areas of the neck. Just a thought.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I was wondering that too.
    I don't think playing through each exercise in all 12 keys ON VIDEO is needed. Though one might play through each exercise in two or three areas of the neck. Just a thought.

    Thanks for responding.

    I was just going through it, and I think I have an idea.

    There are six exercises with two lines each, so I think I'm going to do each line a 4th higher and that will cover all twelve keys and all twelve finger patterns around the circle.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  27. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    I can't imagine anybody is interested in watching me play through each drill in all twelve keys.
    Ha! I'm actually trying to imagine ANYONE being interested in ANYTHING I've posted from this, other than other curious jazz students like myself. :-) Combined, my last 2 have gotten about 25 views. So, I kind of view them as mostly being for me.

    I *do* think it's cool that we've gotten some guitar versions of this posted for posterity. My initial search, several months ago, didn't really yield anything.

    Personally, I will probably post 12 keys in one position for each, but not 2 positions for each one, the way I've done for others.

  28. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by jasaco View Post
    Patterns for Jazz #37 - Deadline version. Comments welcome.
    (BTW, I know that the exercise is supposed to start on the descending line but it doesn't matter. At least not to me. )

    Hey, Jim. Thanks for posting with us.

    Am I remembering correctly that you're a pedal steel player?

  29. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    There are six exercises with two lines each, so I think I'm going to do each line a 4th higher and that will cover all twelve keys and all twelve finger patterns around the circle.
    .
    Yeah. 4ths are kind of my default and the way that I've been playing these. Might be cool to do a different cycle for each one. Thirds, seconds etc.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Ha! I'm actually trying to imagine ANYONE being interested in ANYTHING I've posted from this, other than other curious jazz students like myself. :-) Combined, my last 2 have gotten about 25 views. So, I kind of view them as mostly being for me.

    I *do* think it's cool that we've gotten some guitar versions of this posted for posterity. My initial search, several months ago, didn't really yield anything.

    Personally, I will probably post 12 keys in one position for each, but not 2 positions for each one, the way I've done for others.
    Good post, Matt. Yes, I'm glad there are guitar versions of these. Someone just starting out now could benefit a great deal by starting off with these examples of how to do this on guitar. And just do it. Over the years, this will become a repository of valuable guitar pedagogy (mixed with some silliness and rambling.)

    My next video will be 1231 and 1321 (is that #38 and #39)? I'm not sure how I'll record it but I am practicing them daily.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Hey, Jim. Thanks for posting with us.

    Am I remembering correctly that you're a pedal steel player?
    That's correct. Pedal steel is my main instrument. I try to improve on guitar when I have a little free time. Always open to constructive criticism and no ego in the way.

  32. #31

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    38 and 39. I found two ways of playing them which where difficult to me and did it like that in different keys (only recorded in one, or else it would have been a really long video).

    I am also trying out different ways of recording the audio and direction of cameras, so it’s a bit messy in the AV apartment.


    Patterns for jazz. Pattern 38 and 39. Deadline version. For study group - YouTube


    (edit: not sure why it doesn’t display a in post preview)

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I was wondering that too.
    I don't think playing through each exercise in all 12 keys ON VIDEO is needed. Though one might play through each exercise in two or three areas of the neck. Just a thought.
    Good idea, Matt! I watch all the videos posted and enjoy them no matter what, but I see your point on these ones. Would be different for, say a piano study group working through the same book.

  34. #33

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    40


  35. #34

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    Just one pass at each pattern. Still learning 3 nps fingerings and getting used to those stretches. #40 is MUCH more difficult for me than 38 and 39. Perhaps by tomorrow...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Just one pass at each pattern. Still learning 3 nps fingerings and getting used to those stretches. #40 is MUCH more difficult for me than 38 and 39. Perhaps by tomorrow...
    [/video]
    Good work, Mark. I’m sure you’ll get 40 down too!

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Just one pass at each pattern. Still learning 3 nps fingerings and getting used to those stretches. #40 is MUCH more difficult for me than 38 and 39. Perhaps by tomorrow...

    The descending line on exercise 40 is tough to finger cleanly especially where the scale crosses from the B string to the G string or anywhere that one finger is covering notes on two frets.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    The descending line on exercise 40 is tough to finger cleanly especially where the scale crosses from the B string to the G string or anywhere that one finger is covering notes on two frets.
    Agreed!
    I find this one trickier than the others ascending too. Not as tricky. But a little.

    But there is real value in 3 nps fingerings and I'm gonna get me some! ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  39. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by ErikWasser View Post
    40

    Thanks for posting, Erik. Do you remember what the tempo on this is? Sounds like quarter note triplets over kind of a double time tempo?

  40. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Just one pass at each pattern. Still learning 3 nps fingerings and getting used to those stretches. #40 is MUCH more difficult for me than 38 and 39. Perhaps by tomorrow...

    Good job, Mark. Thanks for posting this.

  41. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    The descending line on exercise 40 is tough to finger cleanly especially where the scale crosses from the B string to the G string or anywhere that one finger is covering notes on two frets.

    .
    A year or so ago I was working on Bert Ligon material, and he utilizes the same pattern ascending and descending. It was kind of a big adjustment for me, because I always learned these patterns in a way in which they "flip" when you change and go the other direction.

    So, basically, I was just awful at all of the "backwards" patterns - like playing a descending pattern while ascending the scale or vice versa. You really can't practice these enough as an entire unit to ever feel like you're getting traction, because the direction you're already good at just keeps getting better, making the more difficult part just sound worse and more and more frustrating.

    I eventually just practiced the "backwards" patterns in isolation until they were at least in the same ballpark. It really helped with the frustration aspects.

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    A year or so ago I was working on Bert Ligon material, and he utilizes the same pattern ascending and descending. It was kind of a big adjustment for me, because I always learned these patterns in a way in which they "flip" when you change and go the other direction.

    So, basically, I was just awful at all of the "backwards" patterns - like playing a descending pattern while ascending the scale or vice versa. You really can't practice these enough as an entire unit to ever feel like you're getting traction, because the direction you're already good at just keeps getting better, making the more difficult part just sound worse and more and more frustrating.

    I eventually just practiced the "backwards" patterns in isolation until they were at least in the same ballpark. It really helped with the frustration aspects.

    Same here. Take pattern 38 for example. I always practiced that as given for ascending but using C B A C, B A G B, etc, for descending. I have to stop and think about it to do the same pattern descending.

    I'm surprised at the patterns chosen here, though. I don't think the majority of them are particularly musical. I would think running scales in 3rds through 7ths would be a more valuable practice and is something I have neglected but plan to put some effort into.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    A year or so ago I was working on Bert Ligon material, and he utilizes the same pattern ascending and descending. It was kind of a big adjustment for me, because I always learned these patterns in a way in which they "flip" when you change and go the other direction.
    Agreed! Matt, I think we've talked about this before. I've had the same trouble. And you're right: the ascent gets better while the descent, although it gets better too, never catches up! So I think you hit on the right solution: just play the backwards pattern.

    I think Reg said something about this once. Something like 'backwards is a different pattern!' It is. And it should be learned that way.

    We may be fooled by the beginner exercise 1234 from the low E to the high and 4321 from the low E back to the high. (Though sticklers would say, 'go back the same way.') That's easy enough to do that way and I think it gave me the idea that everything should be as easy in reverse and if I keep f**king up, well, time to change my picking again! Aaarrgh! ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  44. #43
    Yeah . The problems presented by those backwards patterns are actually great technical work . When you stop practicing them alongside the ones you're already good at, it really helps with frustration factor too. Always best to practice things you don't already know how to play. :-)

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Thanks for posting, Erik. Do you remember what the tempo on this is? Sounds like quarter note triplets over kind of a double time tempo?
    Yes that’s what I was trying to do the bpm was around 160.

  46. #45

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    No metronome today. Wanted the liberty of taking the descent slower, as I still have trouble with it.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  47. #46

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    Here's my offering for the next two sets of exercises. I combined all six patterns into one drill with each line changing scales a 4th higher and using a different finger pattern. Patterns 38 and 39 are at 134 bpm. Patterns 40-43 are at 100 bpm. I took a little liberty with the last pattern and changed it to G7 to set up a blues ending on C7.


    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  48. #47

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    Pattern #38 for deadline. Comments welcome.

    BTW, I've realized that these are really good exercises to slow down and work on economy picking while building the muscle memory.

    Last edited by jasaco; 06-10-2019 at 03:02 PM.

  49. #48
    You guys are awesome. Thanks for posting. I'm out-of-state on a college visit with my youngest child and awaiting news of the birth of a second grandchild with my oldest. I'll try to get something up later this week.

  50. #49

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    Patterns for Jazz #39 for deadline. Comments welcome.


  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    Here's my offering for the next two sets of exercises. I combined all six patterns into one drill with each line changing scales a 4th higher and using a different finger pattern. Patterns 38 and 39 are at 134 bpm. Patterns 40-43 are at 100 bpm. I took a little liberty with the last pattern and changed it to G7 to set up a blues ending on C7
    Great! Sounds more like an etude than exercises!