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  1. #1

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    Hello, is an Eb6 (sounding 3 lines above staff) out of range for electric guitar? A quick search for the standard range suggests that it is, but of course I hear rock players play notes at least this high, though I wouldn't know what technique they are using to do so. The intended context would be in a rock song.
    Thank you!

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  3. #2

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    When musicians talk about "Eb6" we typically mean a chord.
    What you are probably asking about is the tone eb''' at 1244 Hz, aka eb3 (Helmholtz notation).
    Eb6 is a scientific name (tuner machines, MIDI etc.). That's engineering, not music.

    On the guitar, which is a transposing instrument, eb''' is on the 6th line above staff and is located at first string, 23 fret.
    It's possible provided the guitar has a 24 fret neck and a cut away for fret access. On a guitar with 21 - 22 frets or less eb3 can only be played by making a bend. It's not possible on a traditional acoustic, or archtop style guitar (save for some uncustomary designs). A sustained eb''' on a Les Paul standard, calls for distortion and certain skills.

    (There's this old saying, "there's no money above 12th fret". It's a very old saying, that became obsolete for a while, but is rapidly gaining popularity again )
    Last edited by JCat; 05-10-2019 at 04:35 AM.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat View Post
    It's not possible on an acoustic, or archtop style guitar.
    Maybe not on your puny archtop!

    Eb6 possible?-4526874956_c1495a3e78_o-jpg
    Jay

    'boobadoobadoobaooababop!'

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jehu View Post
    Maybe not on your puny archtop!
    Very good, my post is edited accordingly.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat View Post
    ... On the guitar, which is a transposing instrument, eb''' is on the 6th line above staff and is located at first string, 23 fret ...
    I think JCat means "the space above the 6th ledger line" -- but I would advise against writing ledger lines like that in a guitar part. Make liberal use of "8va" and "8vb" indications, instead, if you are adamant to try it.

    Also, I wouldn't write for a guitar in that extreme register. Rock soloists may go there, but I wouldn't make it a regular practice to write parts up there.

  7. #6

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    You can use an e-bow or copious compression to get those high notes to ring out cleanly.

  8. #7

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    Ones up there are called "the dusty frets", lower ones "the money frets".
    Where the transition occurs depends on your guitar and how you play it.

    Having taken up clarinet as a youth, I preferred linearity of ledger lines.
    Did not appreciate ottava until learning classical piano a few years later.
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  9. #8

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    watching vids of some guitar gods playing a les paul and making those upper frets look and sound easy..the 17th fret is where my comfort level ends on my LP..still i persist and try to play in keys in the 17-20th frets..works and sounds ok at slower temps..though the "bass strings" should be avoided that high up-they just dont have enough room for a full sound..solo lines work well at times..

    see vids of larry carlton lee reitenour eric johnson ..and that clapton guy..
    play well ...
    wolf