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  1. #1

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    Hi all,
    ive got to play some old school 2 feel on a couple songs
    I'm backing up a singer ...
    kinda neworleans style
    going into a faster gypsy pompe rhythm

    any tips , I keep drifting into a reggae feel !

    i think I've got to emphasise the one more than the two

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  3. #2

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    First, get to where you can play it straight. No polkas or reggae allowed!

    When playing gypsy rhythm, the easiest way to get the VERY SLIGHT accent that's on 2 and 4 (not 1 and 3) is just to hit a few more strings in your downstroke.

    Make sure that fretting hand is bouncing. The notes should not be ringing out too much.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
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    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3

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    I became happy with my rhythm playing when I let go of the chords on the swung upbeat consistently
    White belt
    My Youtube

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    First, get to where you can play it straight. No polkas or reggae allowed!

    When playing gypsy rhythm, the easiest way to get the VERY SLIGHT accent that's on 2 and 4 (not 1 and 3) is just to hit a few more strings in your downstroke.

    Make sure that fretting hand is bouncing. The notes should not be ringing out too much.
    thanks man
    yeah I try that

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    I became happy with my rhythm playing when I let go of the chords on the swung upbeat consistently
    Yeah I can't play any up beats on this at all

    you seem to have to play it pretty square for it to work

    i saw a docco about the song 'Rock island line"
    it goes from Leadbelly to Trad jazz revival Chris Barber in UK
    to Skiffle groups the Beatles etc

    interesting , it ALL had this 2 feel stomp thing going on

    Its all new to me

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    First, get to where you can play it straight. No polkas or reggae allowed!

    When playing gypsy rhythm, the easiest way to get the VERY SLIGHT accent that's on 2 and 4 (not 1 and 3) is just to hit a few more strings in your downstroke.

    Make sure that fretting hand is bouncing. The notes should not be ringing out too much.
    Tried it Mr B
    great yeah that helps
    my problem is not playing 1 & 3 strong enough
    two feel .... wow it's a whole other thing innit ?

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    Hi all,
    ive got to play some old school 2 feel on a couple songs
    I'm backing up a singer ...
    kinda neworleans style
    going into a faster gypsy pompe rhythm

    any tips , I keep drifting into a reggae feel !

    i think I've got to emphasise the one more than the two
    OK, thing to realise is that you DO NOT ACCENT 2 AND 4. REPEAT, DO NOT ACCENT 2 AND 4. This is a common mistake, like overdotting 1/8ths in a swing line.

    The 2 and 4 are a change in ATTACK, not VOLUME. A good way to think about it is that the strums are 2 and 4 are faster... but also a lot of work comes from the left hand - make 1 and 3 legato and 2 and 4 shorter.

    Now, for a 4/4, make all your accents even.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    Yeah I can't play any up beats on this at all

    you seem to have to play it pretty square for it to work

    i saw a docco about the song 'Rock island line"
    it goes from Leadbelly to Trad jazz revival Chris Barber in UK
    to Skiffle groups the Beatles etc

    interesting , it ALL had this 2 feel stomp thing going on

    Its all new to me
    no, you LET GO of the chords on the swung up beat
    White belt
    My Youtube

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    OK, thing to realise is that you DO NOT ACCENT 2 AND 4. REPEAT, DO NOT ACCENT 2 AND 4. This is a common mistake, like overdotting 1/8ths in a swing line.

    The 2 and 4 are a change in ATTACK, not VOLUME. A good way to think about it is that the strums are 2 and 4 are faster... but also a lot of work comes from the left hand - make 1 and 3 legato and 2 and 4 shorter.

    Now, for a 4/4, make all your accents even.
    Yeah. It's interesting how a release implies an accent. This usually has to be pointed out to people. We typically want to PLAY the accent, by playing louder and are somewhat oblivious to what is happening with the release, which IMPLIES the accent.

    I always point people to organ trios. Organs don't really have the dynamic contrast possibilities of other instruments as much. So, basically EVERYTHING they are doing is implied through the release or harmonic texture. (Number of notes and the way they're voiced).

    Anyway, this stuff is very important in ALL styles. Working with acoustic strummers etc., the element of RELEASE and muting etc. is very often the intangible quality that they know must be missing but which they can't quite put their finger on.

    Also, there's the number of strings strummed, as mentioned above.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 05-03-2019 at 08:55 AM.