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  1. #1

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    I bought a few different picks from Amazon. All Dunlops. 1 pack Primetone and a couple different Jazztone.

    I love the grip of the Primetone. They have a really nice pattern on both sides which really help with gripping. But I like the sound of the Jazztones a little better, but they are also pretty slick.

    Any DIY hacks for picks and grip? I was thinking about getting out the x-acto knife and scoring them, but thought I'd wait and see what others might say.

    Maybe I need to befriend an NFL receiver from the 70's and see if they still have any of that "stickum" left.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    They are pricey, but the Blue Chip picks tend to get sort of tacky once warm between your fingers. Also, their price helps one be careful not to lose them!

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    They are pricey, but the Blue Chip picks tend to get sort of tacky once warm between your fingers. Also, their price helps one be careful not to lose them!
    I've seen them, but I'll never pay $35+ for pick. Ever.

  5. #4

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    Here are things I've tried.

    1. Punching a hole in the pick. I used a punch for 3 ring binder paper. I also used a nail.

    2. Scoring the pick somehow. I've made dimples with a nail, sandpapered, and cut.

    3. Things I called "looseleaf reinforcements" when I was in elementary school. It's that little white circle, sticky on one side, that goes over the hole in 3 hole paper. They didn't stay on forever, but they worked and they had the advantage of making the pick easier to find when I dropped it on a carpet roughly the same color as the pick.

    I think #3 was best, but, for some reason, I don't do it very often.

  6. #5

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    I have good luck with V-picks. A friend gave me one and they're pretty cool... I think they're 'stickier' than Blue Chips but have a similar, nice darkish tone, not clicky. They are hard to drop, but since they're transparent, if you do drop one they can also be hard to find.

  7. #6

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    I bought a Blue Chip once and then lost it within a week of purchase. I kind of think it ended up in the vacuum but I can't be sure. I never found it. That was the last time I bought an expensive pick. I am just not responsible enough to own one!

  8. #7

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    I also like to use common, easy to find disposable picks. I wear out picks in a few days/weeks usually so expensive ones don't make sense to me, i 've tried a few. I just try to work on my grip technique instead of using a complicated pick. This way you can use anything if there 's a need or you want the variety. Generally i am going after effortless picking, whatever style that might be, just go for efficiency, small movements, minimal friction and contact, nothing tense, etc..

  9. #8

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    I use this for my Black Ice picks:

    https://www.amazon.com/Monster-Grips.../dp/B00JER27MO

  10. #9

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    Band aid tape or similar is a common hack


  11. #10

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    Get a cheap bag of cheap for your fingers.

    :-) I meant RESIN :-) LMAO
    Last edited by GNAPPI; 03-15-2019 at 04:37 PM.

  12. #11

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    I just always buy these..!

  13. #12

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    You can get powdered resin that will def increase the grip.

    For me, I just lick the part where I hold. I know, it’s weird and gross, but it’s kind of a habit. I do this before playing every song. Increases the friction significantly.

    I use Dunlop Tortex greens which are kind of a matte finish anyway.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlohaJoe
    I have good luck with V-picks. A friend gave me one and they're pretty cool... I think they're 'stickier' than Blue Chips but have a similar, nice darkish tone, not clicky. They are hard to drop, but since they're transparent, if you do drop one they can also be hard to find.
    I also use V-Picks on a regular basis when playing electric, although I use ruby red acrylic so I can find them (2.75mm, small pointed)! You can stick a V-Pick to your finger tip, turn your finger upside down, and it will stick to your finger and not fall to the floor. I also have picks made from vintage TS and they stick as well.

    I haven't dropped a V-Pick in 5 years.

    My Blue Chip sticks a little, but not as much as V-Picks or TS.

    I've also tried Gravity Picks, also acrylic, very similar to V-Picks and sticky.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bahnzo
    Any DIY hacks for picks and grip? I was thinking about getting out the x-acto knife and scoring them, but thought I'd wait and see what others might say.

    That's what I do. A few x patterns on each side. Maybe 4x4 crosses.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    Here are things I've tried.

    1. Punching a hole in the pick. I used a punch for 3 ring binder paper. I also used a nail.

    Like this - ( ? )

    Moshay Pick Company

    ...no affiliation etc...

  17. #16

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    I prefer a smooth surface with a few punched holes rather than a rough texture.

    Like these:

    How do folks make a pick grip better?-bcibj55-wbcj18-jpg

  18. #17

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    +1 on Monster Grips, I can't manage without them, I'm old so my fingerprint has worn away..... Masking tape wrapped round both sides is a cheap alternative.

  19. #18

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    I used to use Dunlop Ultex Jazz III or or Jazztone picks, but over the last few years I’ve found myself coming to exclusively use these. They have excellent grip, the Delrin lasts an incredibly long time and has very little drag, and I find the varying flexibility depending on how it’s gripped very useful and comfortable.

  20. #19

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    After playing for many years there are some things that don't happen anymore:

    1) I rarely if ever break strings.

    2) My pick doesn't slip.

    Just an observation.

  21. #20

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    I agree that Blue Chips are grippy picks. Acetate Dugain picks are also grippy.

    My new Ibanez Elastomer picks are also grippy and are much less expensive than Dugain or Blue Chip.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    My new Ibanez Elastomer picks are also grippy and are much less expensive than Dugain or Blue Chip.
    I haven't seen the Ibanez ones yet. They are still pricey, but not so much I wouldn't consider them. Do you use the hard or the soft? What makes them grippy, the material they are made from?

  23. #22

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    I like the 2.2mm hard Ibanez.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    I like the 2.2mm hard Ibanez.
    Do they make them in the smaller teardrop? I can only find the 2.2mm in the large size.

  25. #24

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    I have only seen large, but I like them.

    I used little jazz picks for 30 years. Now I like big ones.

  26. #25

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    Try this...

    Hold your pick as if you were about to play (establish your grip)
    Flip the pick over and re-establish your grip
    Do this a few times to estimate how fast this takes
    Can you do this perfectly twice in one second?

    As you play, the pick is subject to being deflected, twisted, or turned out of perfect position. Attempts to stop that by holding it more firmly or treating the pick with some kind of grip enhancer are not really going to work long term (long enough to get through a whole song), but you can train your hand to re-establish your grip as instantly, unconsciously, and often as needed.

    Watching a movie or TV show or other extended period of having your hand free, try holding the pick (without the guitar) and flipping it about every 10 seconds to force it to re-establish your grip... eventually this will become natural and very fast to the point where whenever playing, your hand will instinctively maintain grip and re-establish grip instantly when needed.

  27. #26

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    Apply self adhesive sandpaper strips.

  28. #27

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    Dunlop Delrin 500 2.0mm Prime Grip. $6 for a dozen.

  29. #28

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    gorilla snot and moustache wax

  30. #29

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    Jim Dunlop makes max grip version of the Jazz III.
    A long time ago I read an interview with John McLaughlin where he mentioned using a pocket knife to create grooves for better grip.
    I came with my own take on the idea using a soldering pen, I find it easier to get deeper grooves.

    How do folks make a pick grip better?-20190210_095947_resized_1-jpgHow do folks make a pick grip better?-20190210_100012_resized_1-jpg

  31. #30

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    Gorilla snot is the best I’ve found. However I don’t use it much because Blue Chip picks are naturally grippy due to the material they use. Ironically the gorilla snot comes off very quilt if you use it on that material too. But I’m something that usually gives me grip issues like Tortex, Gorilla Snot works extremely well if I’m not using a Blue Chip pick for some reason.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bahnzo
    I've seen them, but I'll never pay $35+ for pick. Ever.
    I understand that but if it helps the material is 1000 dollars for a block - the cost isn’t just high for the sake of being high and the material lasts forever. The only issue would be if someone is really not careful with their picks and loses them often. I guess coming from bass and the cost of bows, a 35 dollar pick that helps me play better than any other pick I’ve tried in 25 years is totally worth it to me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by rio
    Gorilla snot is the best I’ve found. However I don’t use it much because Blue Chip picks are naturally grippy due to the material they use. Ironically the gorilla snot comes off very quilt if you use it on that material too. But I’m something that usually gives me grip issues like Tortex, Gorilla Snot works extremely well if I’m not using a Blue Chip pick for some reason.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    The moustache wax actually works pretty well. It's more sticky than gorilla snot but I'm not crazy about the extra stickyness. It seems it dries after a while which works better.

  34. #33

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    the issue with both gorilla snot and moustache wax is when you want to play with your thumb...

  35. #34
    I’ve tried every grip enhanced pick out there from the major manufacturers as well as V-Picks, Gravity, and Swiss Picks.

    My favorite thing right now is the Dunlop lavender coloured Derlin 1.5mm - as a base.
    Then comes the sandpaper to shape the tip to a more more jazz III shape with bevels.
    Then I use the soldering pen, but I don’t make lines. Instead, I burn the tip straight in, and make ‘craters’.

    Making the tip sharp let’s me get attack, but the material is soft so it’s not harsh.

    I do have to maintenance the tips often because they’re so soft.

  36. #35

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    I lick my thumb/index and wipe them on my pants. Perfect stickyness

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinlander
    Jim Dunlop makes max grip version of the Jazz III.
    A long time ago I read an interview with John McLaughlin where he mentioned using a pocket knife to create grooves for better grip.
    I came with my own take on the idea using a soldering pen, I find it easier to get deeper grooves.
    I think after reading all the replies, this is probably the best answer....for me anyways. I don't really want to switch to something different, or pay exorbitant prices, or put goop on my fingers...I want to use the pick(s) I like.

    I broke out the x-acto knife last night and scored up one of my jazztones and while it's better, it's still not as nice as the pattern on the primetone which helps with grip. I'd love the primetone if it was thicker, but I've only seen them up to 1.4mm. So, I'm certainly going to try the soldering iron tonight and see how that shapes up.

  38. #37

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    I've never tried a soldering iron, but I've had success scoring lines into a pick with an X-acto knife. I usually score 3 lines at roughly 45 degrees, like slices of a pie. The other thing I've done with picks that have a smooth surface is take a nail file and rough up the sides to improve the grip.

  39. #38

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    This is a pretty good pick. It sounds almost as good as a Blue Chip, and has built-in roughness for grip.
    Dunlop 427PJP John Petrucci Jazz III Guitar Picks 6 Pack

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    3. Things I called "looseleaf reinforcements" when I was in elementary school. It's that little white circle, sticky on one side, that goes over the hole in 3 hole paper. They didn't stay on forever, but they worked and they had the advantage of making the pick easier to find when I dropped it on a carpet roughly the same color as the pick.

    I think #3 was best, but, for some reason, I don't do it very often.
    I found some of these at the Office Depot today. They are called "Reinforcement Labels" and are only $2 for a package of 900 (!).

    I stuck a couple on a pick and they are pretty nice. I would've liked for them to be a tad bit thicker, but I agree, they do seem to work well.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Runepune
    I lick my thumb/index and wipe them on my pants. Perfect stickyness
    not for me. It's worked well for years but this year my skin is so dry that it doesn't work well anymore...

  42. #41

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    I'm also a "licker", lol. Either lick my fingertips (usually only in the winter, when humidity is low and my skin id drier; in the other season when humidity is up I never have a problem), or if I'm sweating at all run my fingertips thru what's left of my hair to pick up a little of that LOL works well too. I keep it simple.

    I have also found using hand cream just before helps, as it makes your SKIN stickier (it's not sticky, it's just moisturized and has better grip).

  43. #42

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    I used to be a "carver," but now I use D'Andrea pro plecs, and they seem to naturally get a little sticky as they warm up.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    You can get powdered resin that will def increase the grip.

    For me, I just lick the part where I hold. I know, it’s weird and gross, but it’s kind of a habit. I do this before playing every song. Increases the friction significantly.

    I use Dunlop Tortex greens which are kind of a matte finish anyway.
    Johnny Gimble would lick his thumb every time he picked up his mandolin.

    He would pick up the mandolin, lick his thumb, remove the pick from the strings then procede to play.

    Your in good company.

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I used to be a "carver," but now I use D'Andrea pro plecs, and they seem to naturally get a little sticky as they warm up.
    Did D'Andrea ever sort out their bent / warped issue? I just found an old lost pro post, warped like so many others...into the trash. Pro plecs are the greatest sounding , most poorly manufactured picks available.

  46. #45

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    Dont know. Had a few hundred over the past 6-7 years, never had a warped one.

  47. #46

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    I've had great success with Plasti Dip. It's the liquid stuff that's generally used to coat/rubberize tool handles. Comes in a can. I hold the front end of the pick with a hemostat. Then dip the pick's back end into the Plasti Dip can. Lift the pick out, let the excess drip off back down into the container, hang the hemostat so the pick won't touch any surfaces, and let dry. Takes maybe 30 minutes to dry. I can make the coating as thin or thick as I like. The coating stays intact for many months for me. Hard to drop them. It comes in different colors. I use red because it makes the pick more visible when you lose it. Works great for me.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    I prefer a smooth surface with a few punched holes rather than a rough texture.

    Like these:

    How do folks make a pick grip better?-bcibj55-wbcj18-jpg
    I make mine like that with my drill press. I'm still not convinced that it makes much of a difference.

  49. #48

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    How do folks make a pick grip better?-screenshot_20190414-111410_samsung-internet-jpgHow do folks make a pick grip better?-screenshot_20190414-111402_samsung-internet-jpg

    Never tried soldering tip - an especially tiny tip might be really cool ...

    The above pics are the Black 1.5 mm and the Pink 1.2 mm delrin from D'Addario Planet Waves .

    The waffle pattern is really deep and sharp
    for extreme grip.



    A pretty nice pick - these are very slightly harder than the normal delrin and relatively low noise but articulate.

    For other picks - I have scored them but I like the soldering thing because it should cause an even rougher surface
    Last edited by Robertkoa; 04-14-2019 at 09:06 PM.

  50. #49

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    Superglue. Now my pick never leaves my hand.

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Superglue. Now my pick never leaves my hand.
    Lol. John Stowell somehow supposedly gets his pick to stick - didn't read it all .

    I need harmonic superglue to get all my notes ( 89.4%) to stick perfectly to the chord I am playing over ...

    If it ( CA ) works for frets - it should work for notes ...¿