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  1. #1

    How do you string-up?

    I never gave this much thought, I change strings often, and on my Rock rigs, some have
    locking tuners, and on the ones without, I would just wrap the sting a couple time around the peg
    put her through the hole, and tighten the rest of the way.

    Always worked fine, but never considered "what could have been"...

    But when I bought a new Mandolin from Luthier, Maegen Wells, I was shocked me when
    after playing this fine instrument a couple of days I noticed this...

    How do you string-up?-mw_stringwrap-jpg

    I have never seen this amount of love put into a simple string-wrap, but the effect is
    very satisfying, so I asked her what the story was.. She explained that after working
    so many hours producing a lovely instrument, she didn't want to rush through the finale
    A great sentiment! She says just poke the sting through the hole and apply downward
    pressure which will ensure that the string will wind it's way down the peg without any
    overlapping. She added that this will increase the break angle behind the nut and will
    make a huge difference in how open strings will ring.

    I just think it looks great, can't believe I have never seen a wrap like this and I have
    been re-srtinging guitars for > 50 years!

    OK... so my 1st effort didn't get all of the way there, but it's a start!

    How do you string-up?-excelstring-jpg
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  2. #2
    I've thought just about everyone did that... it does look real sharp. To get it "right" takes a few restrings until you learn to gauge how much string length for the size of the string will wrap enough times to make it all the way down the pole without crowding at the bottom.

    The fat strings use up string length faster wrapping the pole, but they are fatter and you get less wraps before crowding the bottom of the pole; the thin strings use less string length on the wraps but it takes more of them to get the wraps down to the bottom of the pole.

    Next time, examine the pole wraps before taking the strings off, then uncoil the old string wraps to see just how long the string lengths were for what you saw... figure accordingly to adjust for full pole length without crowding for next time (I think most guitarists use their own finger lengths between joints to measure and remember). After a few string changes you'll know exactly how much tight string length past the pole needs to be backed up as slack before winding, for each string.
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    sanluisobispo CA
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    47
    I do the one over 3 under style. I am wondering why some are not as many winds as others. also note if you wind it all the way down some time the string will bind when tuneing up.

  4. #4
    I saw a Danny Gatton video where he said you need string all fenders that way. Why fenders specifically I'm not sure. I string up my squier tele like that just to be safe
    White belt
    My Youtube

  5. #5


    correction, he says "especially fenders"
    White belt
    My Youtube

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    North Coast Pennsylvania
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    I use the maximum wrap method on all my non-PRS guitars. The PRSs have the nifty Sperzel locking tuners which tune to up with 1/2 - 2/3 turns to pitch and stay pitched. It's a matter of eliminating slack all through the string. Also, I always change one string at a time with very rare exceptions.
    Best regards, k

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post


    correction, he says "especially fenders"
    Oh Man... the HUMBLER!!!

    Was listening to Guitarwank podcast the other day and they had a 3-parter with
    Joe Bonamassa (who I have for some reason never been fond of) and Joe started
    hanging out with Danny Gatton when he was a 12 year-old. He told a couple great
    Danny stories.

    By the end of the podcast, I developed a degree of fondness and respect for Mr Bonamassa.

    My favorite quote was Joe said whenever he overheard folks discussing him he was always
    referred to as "oh ...THAT guy..." he says he plans on retiring young and wants to become
    an internet troll!
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  8. #8
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    Aug 2015
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    cali
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papawooly View Post
    She added that this will increase the break angle behind the nut and will
    make a huge difference in how open strings will ring.

    yay, ms wells..i've said this in many threads..the break angle from nut to tuner contributes to tone..& "ring"...and feel!!!...winding strings with that many wraps is going to make them respond far differently than just one or two wraps on the top of the tuning post...

    one way is not inherently better than the other..but you can fix specific problems by being aware of the difference!!

    got a tele with a floppy buzzy low E string...wrap that tuning post full and increase that break angle


    cheers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St.Petersburg, Russian Federation
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    I do not really care how it looks, but it may affect tuning stability, I just try to make very little turnaourds (For basses it could be enough 1-2 too actually, on your pics it's too many for me)), and avoid turning the string around its axes.

    I would just wrap the sting a couple time around the peg
    put her through the hole, and tighten the rest of the way.
    I never do this because it causes winding around the string axe. (and also because I was taught another way when I was kid)))

    I put a string in a nut hole leaving only a few cms that I would need to wind it (depends on the string), and that put end of the sting back under... it is ususually enough 3-4 winds for 1-3 strings, and 1-2 for basses...

    Here's the video of this methd, it is in Russian... He talks a lot and interesting but ayou do not understand it if you might want to drop it go to 07:00
    but you do not need to understand the language, the guy actually demonstrates it very well really.
    I saw many professional vids, but this home video is the cleares and imho the most correct one.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St.Petersburg, Russian Federation
    Posts
    2,567
    I do not really care how it looks, but it may affect tuning stability, I just try to make very little turnaourds (For basses it could be enough 1-2 too actually, on your pics it's too many for me)), and avoid turning the string around its axes.

    I would just wrap the sting a couple time around the peg
    put her through the hole, and tighten the rest of the way.
    I never do this because it causes winding around the string axe. (and also because I was taught another way when I was kid)))

    I put a string in a nut hole leaving only a few cms that I would need to wind it (depends on the string), and that put end of the sting back under... it is ususually enough 3-4 winds for 1-3 strings, and 1-2 for basses...

    Here's the video of this methd, it is in Russian... He talks a lot and interesting but ayou do not understand it if you might want to drop it go to 07:00
    but you do not need to understand the language, the guy actually demonstrates it very well really.
    I saw many professional vids, but this home video is the cleares and imho the most correct one.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    New York, NY, USA
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by pauln View Post
    I've thought just about everyone did that... it does look real sharp. To get it "right" takes a few restrings until you learn to gauge how much string length for the size of the string will wrap enough times to make it all the way down the pole without crowding at the bottom.

    The fat strings use up string length faster wrapping the pole, but they are fatter and you get less wraps before crowding the bottom of the pole; the thin strings use less string length on the wraps but it takes more of them to get the wraps down to the bottom of the pole.

    Next time, examine the pole wraps before taking the strings off, then uncoil the old string wraps to see just how long the string lengths were for what you saw... figure accordingly to adjust for full pole length without crowding for next time (I think most guitarists use their own finger lengths between joints to measure and remember). After a few string changes you'll know exactly how much tight string length past the pole needs to be backed up as slack before winding, for each string.
    I find that 2-3 wraps is enough, and more than that makes tuning less stable and makes it harder to turn the tuning machine. One of many reasons I hate the Fender style "Safe-T-Post" tuners (which require you to either cut the string before installing or wrap the whole string).

    I recently tried TI Jazz Bebop strings, and wasn't sure how to deal with the cloth wrapping at the end of the string, so wound them all the way down the post. This re-confirmed that too many wraps means worse tuning stability and more difficulty turning the post. Tuning is now all over the place on this guitar, and I feel like I'm about to shear off the button when I tune. Meanwhile, my other guitars with 2 or 3 wraps are pointing and laughing and going "ooh look at you with Mr. Fancy Teutonic Strings that won't stay in tune." I hate that.

    John

  12. #12

    How do you string-up?

    I use the method suggested by Frank Ford since it does a nice job of locking the end of the string. But I’ll increase the number of turns on certain strings if I think the break angle needs to be greater. On a three per side headstock I usually give the 3rd and 4th strings more turns. But with roundwound strings, if I make the break angle too strong on the 5th & 6th strings I think it can create too much friction in the nut slot making it more difficult to tune, so I try to keep those turns to a minimum. In any case, I try to keep the wraps tight and tidy so they won’t slip.
    FRETS.COM

  13. #13
    I was taught to do the thing where you lock the string with the first wrap. But, when I recently took delivery of a brand new Comins GCS-1, the wraps were like the OP described -- no locking, but all the way down the post, very neat.

  14. #14

    How do you string-up?

    I tried the Frank Ford method with TI strings once, but had to change the bend angle a bit to make a correction and the string snapped off there. I wonder if TI uses an alloy that is more prone to fatigue than most. I’ve never had a problem with other strings, but that sharp kink does create a weak spot.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    cali
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    no!! the locking string method came out of the era of round core (not roundwound!) strings!!!..was fairly common for the outer windings to slip from the round core when bent or curled...these days thats a lesser problem..firstly because so few string companies make round core strings...thomastik, pyramid, dr and very few others...secondly cause the tech is better..as far as winding..and the knowledge about how to correctly install them

    the fender design pretty much did away with that old locking technique...you stick the string down the middle of the tuning post and wrap evenly


    if you are having trouble with stringing modern thoms...thats why!!!...up your tech...or stick with hex core strings!!!

    when the great john d'angelico got together with the d'addario family way back when..he insisted that they develop bronze strings on a hex core!!!..less prone to kinks & unwinding...such was the tech of that time..near 100 years ago

    cheers

    ps- has nothing to do with type of alloy..thomastik, pyramid and dr all use pure nickel!!! it's the core

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    Is this the ' first wrap lock ' that's described here ? If not how do you end up with this look ? My luthier has done this since day one, and I tried to find a method once, but I never found one.
    How do you string-up?-11-8-002-640x480-jpg (( and sorry about the dust on the guitar )).

  17. #17

    How do you string-up?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    Is this the ' first wrap lock ' that's described here ? If not how do you end up with this look ? My luthier has done this since day one, and I tried to find a method once, but I never found one.
    That’s the Frank Ford (frets.com) method. He goes through it step by step here:
    FRETS.COM Archtop Restring
    Last edited by KirkP; 11-08-2018 at 06:32 PM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    How do you string-up?-11-8-002-640x480-jpg (( and sorry about the dust on the guitar )).
    Dennis,

    I find out that if I zoom in on ANYTHING it looks flawed...
    I would wager you could go back in time and zoom in close enough ...
    even a 20 yr old Brigitte Bardot would have flaws... ummm bad example...
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
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    85
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    Is this the ' first wrap lock ' that's described here ? If not how do you end up with this look ? My luthier has done this since day one, and I tried to find a method once, but I never found one.
    I did this accidentally, the last time I changed my strings. I thought I had made a terrible mistake, but it works. I doubt I could do it again.

  20. #20
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    Jul 2016
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    Baja Baja Oklahoma
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    I've been wrapping the Frank Ford way for many years, since long before I ever heard of him, and before the internet existed. With that lock, you don't need many wraps. I tend to put a couple of wraps on the bass E, and put more as the strings get smaller. Probably not necessary, but I put more on the treble E string, just in case. I've tried wrapping to the bottom of the capstan, and find no advantage at all. I think tone differences are about the same as using silver speaker cable. It's the placebo effect. If you like it, use it.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papawooly View Post
    Dennis,
    I find out that if I zoom in on ANYTHING it looks flawed...
    I would wager you could go back in time and zoom in close enough ...
    even a 20 yr old Brigitte Bardot would have flaws... ummm bad example...
    Sorry, PW, I didn't know my Kodak Brownie could even get that close !!

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP View Post
    I use the method suggested by Frank Ford since it does a nice job of locking the end of the string. But I’ll increase the number of turns on certain strings if I think the break angle needs to be greater. On a three per side headstock I usually give the 3rd and 4th strings more turns. But with roundwound strings, if I make the break angle too strong on the 5th & 6th strings I think it can create too much friction in the nut slot making it more difficult to tune, so I try to keep those turns to a minimum. In any case, I try to keep the wraps tight and tidy so they won’t slip.
    FRETS.COM
    This is what I do with the ultimate goal of ending up with 1.5 complete wraps around the post.
    Ignorance is agony.



  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    sanluisobispo CA
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    47
    so after thinking about all of this how many wraps, The Next time I change strings i am going to use more wraps, For the break angle and so all the string tension is closer to the Head which will make the Tuner last longer and less stress on the head

  24. #24
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    Oct 2009
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    East of Eden
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    Very simple, but stable enough for a heavy blues bender like Bonamassa. Installing strings @ 2:15


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