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  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I actually do PGs left hand exercises and it has helped.... a bit. They are much harder than they look at first. I like to torment my more able students with them as well. Is always funny.

    #guitarteachersaredicks

    Actually chord fretting is the thing which ends up sucking the most if I don’t warm up. I don’t think it helps that I play a 60s Gibson with a silly skinny neck lol.

    Loars like what you play have nice necks once you overlook the small detail that they are fucking triangular. Nigel Price refused to play mine (he needed an acoustic guitar for a session we were doing.)

    I told him that ‘he’d fought the Loar and the Loar won.’ He didn’t look very impressed.
    I do those warm ups too every time I sit down to practice, it has improved my technique, my fingers are able to stay in position better and i keep them closer to the fretboard. Just slowly notching up the metronome helps too each day by 2 or 3 clicks, not to mention it helps right hand too with string skipping.

    Dare I say, I kind of like the neck on my Loar? It has one my heart so to speak.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    I do those warm ups too every time I sit down to practice, it has improved my technique, my fingers are able to stay in position better and i keep them closer to the fretboard. Just slowly notching up the metronome helps too each day by 2 or 3 clicks, not to mention it helps right hand too with string skipping.

    Dare I say, I kind of like the neck on my Loar? It has one my heart so to speak.
    I like mine too!

    It's actually TONED DOWN from what the original Gibson L5's had - Ofer Landsberg was kind enough to let me try his early 30s L5 and it has a more pronounced triangle cross section IIRC.

    You know they had that style of neck to help leverage for super heavy strings and high actions right?

  3. #63
    Are you guys talking about Pasquale’s mymasterclass exercises, or something else?

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    More wibblyscribble

    This video is awesome in many ways! Thanks for doing it

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamirgal View Post
    Are you guys talking about Pasquale’s mymasterclass exercises, or something else?
    That one, there was another exercise he mentioned in his UNO clinic - but that appears to have been taken down... I wonder why?

  6. #66
    So Christian, in your opinion, does pasquale do DWPS or is he more of an economy player? Same question with Chuck Wayne?

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    So Christian, in your opinion, does pasquale do DWPS or is he more of an economy player? Same question with Chuck Wayne?
    Both are classic two way economy pickers.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Both are classic two way economy pickers.
    Although most people slant one way or the other naturally. DWPS I think is natural for a floating hand player.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Although most people slant one way or the other naturally. DWPS I think is natural for a floating hand player.
    From what I could tell, Pasquale and Chuck Wayne don't pick with the flat end they kind of come at it at an angle if that makes sense?

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Although most people slant one way or the other naturally. DWPS I think is natural for a floating hand player.
    I've been practicing that picking for just about over a year, and this is where I'm at with it.


  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    I return often to Frisell to remind me there is no point being preoccupied with technique.

    Again, I think technique means playing with ease and relaxed, in that sense we all need to work on it until it's there. Bill Frisell has great technique IMO.

    Maybe having 'chops' is different. I don't think Bill Frisell has a lot of chops, compare to someone like Pasquale, but he sure has great tone and ideas.

    My crazy teacher in college told me all you need is to have a great tone. I asked him what about music itself, and he said tone is music. Of course tone as is in your hands.

    My picking is fine by now, but phrasing... I think working on phrasing is a lifetime work, no matter how good the technique is.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    I've been practicing that picking for just about over a year, and this is where I'm at with it.

    Seems to coming along very nicely.

    Doesn’t PG use motion from the finger joints a lot? I can’t really see if that’s what you are doing here.

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    From what I could tell, Pasquale and Chuck Wayne don't pick with the flat end they kind of come at it at an angle if that makes sense?
    Yeah to be honest I think most players that don’t want a plinky sound do this.... that’s why gypsy jazzers use big picks with bevels until like Birelli they realise they can use a standard pick at an incline and get a similar sort of sound.

    That’s the reason why I swapped over to the thumb in grip - more angle, softens the attack and makes the sound even more legato. Not so good for hybrid though.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Seems to coming along very nicely.

    Doesn’t PG use motion from the finger joints a lot? I can’t really see if that’s what you are doing here.
    I've tried to copy pasquales posture as much as I could. When you're facing him straight on you can't see his thumb and fingers because of the angle he's holding his wrist/pick

    Example:

  15. #75
    Compare the thumbnail pics on my vid and Pasquale and you'll see what I mean

    Edit: look at how little my wrist is moving also

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by don_oz View Post
    I've been practicing that picking for just about over a year, and this is where I'm at with it.

    Nicely done. I think I missed it though is this showing Pasquale’s mymasterclass exercises or DWPS?
    I wonder if Pasquale has spider fingers. Apparently Rachmaninoff may have had it.
    Anybody know how to tweak fibrillin-1 or fibrillin-2 genes? That's a really useful mod.
    Arachnodactyly - Wikipedia

  17. #77
    So here's what i've been practicing for fun and for building chops (sorry I can't just noodle and talk for a video, I'm too uptight lol). On the least comfortable guitar for myself- wide neck, high action. So if you accuse me of sloppiness

    I think it's alternate most of the time, but not quite sure...



  18. #78
    wow that does look like high action, hep
    White belt
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  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Again, I think technique means playing with ease and relaxed, in that sense we all need to work on it until it's there. Bill Frisell has great technique IMO.

    Maybe having 'chops' is different. I don't think Bill Frisell has a lot of chops, compare to someone like Pasquale, but he sure has great tone and ideas.

    My crazy teacher in college told me all you need is to have a great tone. I asked him what about music itself, and he said tone is music. Of course tone as is in your hands.

    My picking is fine by now, but phrasing... I think working on phrasing is a lifetime work, no matter how good the technique is.

    Yes. I find virtuosos rather boring. I think a musician can become obsessed with technique, to the detriment of music. The likes of Satriani and Vai produce music that is perfect but lifeless. Frisell reminds me that music is about the musician and the instrument.

  20. #80
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    Newsflash from the academy: the upstroke is the new downstroke.

  21. #81
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    Pick Technique Flame War Fun!

    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    Yes. I find virtuosos rather boring. I think a musician can become obsessed with technique, to the detriment of music. The likes of Satriani and Vai produce music that is perfect but lifeless. Frisell reminds me that music is about the musician and the instrument.
    Hey I like Joe! I think he writes good tunes and makes fun records.

    But I wouldn’t think of him as displaying great technique in any of the stuff he’s recorded. He’s got a few tricks and he can play some stuff really fast. That’s not technique. That’s licks.

    Maybe he rinses bop heads in private (he was a Tristano student) but I dunno.

    I mean if he could play the Black Page - that’s technique. So Vai had great technique developed to execute written music. And a bucket load of tricks of course because Hair metal and because ‘80s.

    When it comes to improvisation I think it’s really tough to say what technique is because it’s so personal. Bill has great technique for being Bill.

    But in general it means for me a certain flexibility and ability to execute things as they occur to me in real time rather than always pre worked out modular licks. This isn’t super fast in the way a Satch legato thing would be for instance, but it’s demanding in a different way.

    I think the only reason guitarists get obsessed with technique (or more correctly playing really fast) is because it’s comparatively rare. And because they have no idea what it actually means.

    Yngwie had terrible technique in the 80s for instance. But he could play certain licks super fast and clean.

  22. #82
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    That said, can we think of any examples of technically great players who don’t tend to play lots of fast stuff when they improvise?

  23. #83
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    ......and another thing!

    Also, when did technique come to mean - widdle up and down scales and arps real fast?

    Here's a good one, get a young chap with a pointy headstock guitar to sit down with the tabs to John Lennon's guitar part to Dear Prudence and watch them make excuses (or as increasingly is the case with young'uns, rather charmingly get the point in a humble and accepting way).

    Bill Frisell is a virtuoso of sound - his sensitivity to just where to pick a note, how to finger scales and so on to maximise over-ring and resonance, so that in the words of Leni Stern - always sounds like he's got a reverb pedal on even when he's playing acoustic - that is technically difficult actually, and I think more of us here could play bebop lines and tapping licks than make that magic happen seemingly effortlessly.

    I think a multi-dimensional understanding of technique and what it offers to the player, as well as developing a player to be well rounded with a technique capable of handling a variety of different situations would be much more valuable than the guitar magazine idea of technique = fast. But I think ALL experienced players understand that.

  24. #84
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    What is the meaning of the term musical technique?

    Learn to be indifferent to what makes no difference. Marcus Aurelius

  25. #85
    What is technique?

    Sent from my SM-C7000 using Tapatalk

  26. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by mikostep View Post
    What is technique?

    Sent from my SM-C7000 using Tapatalk
    Good question. Technique means two distinct things. They are often confused.
    1- A simplified approximation of the mechanics used by players that have similar approach to some aspect of guitar.
    2- An individual player's facility in executing the above in musical situations.

    Eg.
    1- Pat Martino uses the alternate picking technique.
    2- Pat Martino has great picking technique.
    Obviously the second sentence doesn't claim that alternate picking is great. It's referring to the players ability.

    So when one is copying Pat Martino's technique they are copying 1. But the results they get depends on 2 which they can't copy.

  27. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Hey I like Joe! I think he writes good tunes and makes fun records.
    thx man
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  28. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    wow that does look like high action, hep
    It is! I love playing rhythm on this one, not so much soloing. But in most situations I have no choice, so I have to tough it out.

  29. #89
    So if people can play fast and clean licks, but can't play rhythm guitar worth of $hit, does it mean they have great technique?

    There is one Russian shredder I've heard on Youtube, a well known one in that region, and he said a funny thing, the ultimate test for a guitarist- play the rhythm part of Shoot To Thrill. Obviously he was targeting rock and shred players, but I think he has a point regardless.

    Anyway, he said no one could pass the test, people laugh it out and say it's the easiest thing in the world not worth their time, but then they can't do it!

  30. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I think the only reason guitarists get obsessed with technique (or more correctly playing really fast) is because it’s comparatively rare. And because they have no idea what it actually means.
    And the fans love it. Technical virtuosity, the ability to dazzle an audience with the speed and skill of one's playing, has been part of music since Paganini became big. Theoretical virtuosity is much older, but is no longer highly regarded by the musical public.

    I think guitarists become obsessed with technique because they believe it will solve all their problems and make them great musicians. Finding a way to use the plectrum with maximum efficiency is a single-minded quest for perfection, which too often ignores everything else that is necessary to play well.

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