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  1. #1

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    So, I decided to take the plunge and try to spend some time learning hybrid picking (I am a finger picker, exclusively and have been for some time). Seems to me that one has to understand and practice some very essential things in terms of (1) Digits available: and (2) # of strings skipped in use of digits available.


    Digits Available:

    P-pick
    M-middle finger
    A-annular (ring) finger
    C-pinky

    1. Digit combinations and permissible strings that can be skipped between any TWO digits:

    P-M/M-A/A-C---- can skip 0 or 1 string (65,54,43,32,21, 64, 53, 42, 31) 9 string combinations
    P-A/M-C----------can skip 1 or 2 strings (64, 53, 42, 31, 63, 52, 41) 7 string combinations
    P-C----------------can skip 2, 3 or 4 strings: 63, 52, 41, 62, 51, 61): 6 string combinations.

    2. Conventional open voiced 4 note chords we all know can be played PMAC
    3. P acts as a thumb and cover 654 while MAC can cover 321, 432, 543
    4. Closed voice triads can be played PMA, MAC
    5. Spread triads can be played: PMA, PMC, MAC

    Any other fundamental issues to work on? What do you think???
    Navdeep Singh.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Play tunes, provide your own accompanyment. It will teach you everything.

    Less is more. 3 note chords are big.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    So, I decided to take the plunge and try to spend some time learning hybrid picking (I am a finger picker, exclusively and have been for some time). Seems to me that one has to understand and practice some very essential things in terms of (1) Digits available: and (2) # of strings skipped in use of digits available.


    Digits Available:

    P-pick
    M-middle finger
    A-annular (ring) finger
    C-pinky

    1. Digit combinations and permissible strings that can be skipped between any TWO digits:

    P-M/M-A/A-C---- can skip 0 or 1 string (65,54,43,32,21, 64, 53, 42, 31) 9 string combinations
    P-A/M-C----------can skip 1 or 2 strings (64, 53, 42, 31, 63, 52, 41) 7 string combinations
    P-C----------------can skip 2, 3 or 4 strings: 63, 52, 41, 62, 51, 61): 6 string combinations.

    2. Conventional open voiced 4 note chords we all know can be played PMAC
    3. P acts as a thumb and cover 654 while MAC can cover 321, 432, 543
    4. Closed voice triads can be played PMA, MAC
    5. Spread triads can be played: PMA, PMC, MAC

    Any other fundamental issues to work on? What do you think???
    You are thinking too much. Pick for the bass. Middle finger and Ring finger for 2 carefully chosen harmonies. Mr Beaumont said less is more. 3 note chords are huge


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #4

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    ya, of course. that still leaves the principle technical issue: bringing the C finger into play to play the melody, note, as needed. When you play finger-style, the C finger is hardly EVER utilized. Most stuff you can get by with PIMA. I think some flamenco cats use the C, but really, practically speaking, it hardly gets used.

    I don't even have any nail on my C finger. It's weak and very undeveloped.

    Guess you gotta start somewhere.
    Navdeep Singh.

  6. #5

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    I never use the pinky, I never miss it.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  7. #6

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    Well, as the British say, "I had a go" and boy was I humbled. It reminded me how natural it has become for me to play with the fingers where I don't have to think about anything.

    I incorporate a lot of wide intervals in my playing, especially 13ths and 10ths. I noticed that it wasn't the top note that sounded bad, but the plectrum picked note in the bass. More coordination is needed, of course.

    It is also quite natural for me to play four note block (plucked) chords with the fingers , and for this in a hybrid fashion, you really do need the Pinky, or C finger .

    So I went and practiced a lot of three note chords using only MAC. It sounded like shit. Maybe also less shitty tomorrow. And a little less after that .
    Navdeep Singh.

  8. #7

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    Just brush two strings with the ring finger. Pinky''s completely unnecessary.

    If you need more, strum. You're holding a pick!

    What kind of pick are you using? Took me a long time to find one that sounds most like a finger, to keep balance.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  9. #8

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    Small heavy teardrop pick, no brand in particular--it had my old teacher's name on it.

    I'm not really talking about strumming or even playing lines with the pick, that's still somewhat ingrained and coming back readily.

    It's the idea of playing 2,3 or 4 notes simultaneously that will take more work getting comfortable. Strumming is natural, using the pick to play lines is natural, playing fingerstyle is natural.

    I guess my fingers are so used to moving in a certain way, in tandem or independently, they need to get "reprogrammed" to work a bit differently.

    Basically, I figured out that I have much more TENSION in the right hand holding the pick and playing the fingers than I do fingers only. Makes sense, I've been 100% playing fingers only for a few years now and have gotten quite comfortable doing it.

    When I started playing fingers only, I worked really hard at developing some semblance of a classical technique with the right hand, so I worked a lot on finger independence and relaxation, using various combinations, making sure to always alternate unless slurring, etc.

    It's just going to take some time getting comfortable with this. I've never brushed two notes with the A finger of the right hand, I'll give it a shot.

    Like anything else, the more you do it, the less uncomfortable it will become.

    What ever happened to the "Time on the Instrument" guy? Pierre?
    Navdeep Singh.

  10. #9

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    When I got into some hybrid I focused more on simple comping things and making sure my time was as tight as possible, as my fingers have a little slower of a trigger than my pick.

    I also spend some time doing Giuliani's studies with PIMA replaced with "P"MAC for hybrid.

    Some great players like this book a lot: Hybrid Picking for Guitar (Book & CD): Gustavo Assis-Brasil: 9780977439805: Amazon.com: Books
    I borrowed it once and it didn't catch my attention much, but something to look into.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    I'm not really talking about strumming or even playing lines with the pick, that's still somewhat ingrained and coming back readily.

    It's the idea of playing 2,3 or 4 notes simultaneously that will take more work getting comfortable.
    I use MAC, with and without pick.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Small heavy teardrop pick, no brand in particular--it had my old teacher's name on it.

    I'm not really talking about strumming or even playing lines with the pick, that's still somewhat ingrained and coming back readily.

    It's the idea of playing 2,3 or 4 notes simultaneously that will take more work getting comfortable. Strumming is natural, using the pick to play lines is natural, playing fingerstyle is natural.

    I guess my fingers are so used to moving in a certain way, in tandem or independently, they need to get "reprogrammed" to work a bit differently.

    Basically, I figured out that I have much more TENSION in the right hand holding the pick and playing the fingers than I do fingers only. Makes sense, I've been 100% playing fingers only for a few years now and have gotten quite comfortable doing it.

    When I started playing fingers only, I worked really hard at developing some semblance of a classical technique with the right hand, so I worked a lot on finger independence and relaxation, using various combinations, making sure to always alternate unless slurring, etc.

    It's just going to take some time getting comfortable with this. I've never brushed two notes with the A finger of the right hand, I'll give it a shot.

    Like anything else, the more you do it, the less uncomfortable it will become.

    What ever happened to the "Time on the Instrument" guy? Pierre?
    Yep, practice is it, for sure.

    Do experiment with pick materials...you'll be surprised what a difference that makes.

    And do practice playing two strings with a ring finger "brush" upward, it's very doable.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  13. #12

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    c finger is very useful. from an engineering standpoint, the more points of contact, the more possibilities. if you want to really get into hybrid styles, pick and 3 digits are better and easier in the long run. I'm reasonably sure that pianists use 10 digits. Should we tell them that's too many?

  14. #13

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    Ya, Ron . I just got home and spent one and a half hours practicing, basically attempting to do everything I can do regarding 3 or 4 note BLOCK chords without the pick with the pick. I mean, if you can't do the same things, it seems it will be better just to go back to finger style . Basically this means replacing PIMA with PMAC or IMA with MAC or PMA. I play a lot of what is drop two and four major or minor 6 block chords , whoch means strings 54 and 21, skipping 3. At this point, I have to learn how to use the C finger. It certainly is better than yesterday , thankfully. I think if I can replicate what I can do With the fingers (PIMA ), added bonus is the ability to use the pick for strumming and for lines.

    playing 2 note wide intervals (e.g., 10ths and 13ths ) with the pick and usually the A finger was not as hard as I thought it would be.

    Progesss.
    ' I tried to use the A finger to "brush" to strings, but that's gonna take a lot of work .

    Also, I realized I had another pick, a thick white pick with grooves --- I think it was a gypsy guitar pick that I paid 10 bucks for at this gypsy guitar shop in Lincoln Square years ago. That's a lot of money to spend on the pick, but somehow I've kept it for many years .
    Navdeep Singh.

  15. #14

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    You need to develop a system for your practicing. I've been working on this for about 6 weeks, and I created or borrowed exercises from the classical guitar world. Working with your pick and each individual finger (both alternating and together), then groups of two fingers, then all 3 using a variety of arpeggio combinations works well. i would suggest that the Giuliani exercises be compressed to 4 adjacent strings to start, I often warm up with just open string patterns before engaging the left hand. I do recommend the Assis-Brasil "Hybrid Picking For Guitar" as it is very exhaustive in developing a good technique and moves along at a manageable pace.

    I was a classical-flamenco-jazz fingerstyle player for many years, but developed focal dystonia, a neurological condition, that took my right-hand technique away, especially control of my index finger, so this is a good solution for me, and using all three remaining fingers with the pick allows me to play easy classical pieces for wedding ceremonies, which have always provided a good portion of my income. This technique also is very useful for exploring Mick Goodrick's Mr. Goodchord ideas as well.

    Also, my studies in trying to overcome the focal dystonia showed me that the little finger ("c") is much stronger and more flexible than anyone might imagine, because of the way the hand is structured. I find it easier to use than the a finger in many cases.
    Last edited by ronjazz; 03-15-2017 at 09:24 AM.

  16. #15

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    BTW: Pasquale plays octaves and intervals (2 note voicings) using the Pick for the bass note and alternates the M and A for the upper note.

    I make no bones about the fact that I want to play as much as possible like him, so that's why I decided to switch from finger to hybrid. He has everything in his arsenal and he plays so beautifully and sounds so GREAT as well.

    I also note that stuff I forgot about with regard to the pick (within the framework of single note lines) and picking with the pick--all that stuff about alternate picking v directional/economy picking and picking from the elbow v picking from the wrist v picking from the two fingers that hold the pick (the P and I)--Jesus, so much stuff to re-learn. I was glad to learn that a lot of it's kind of coming back to me.

    I think I agree with him: economy picking makes perfect sense otherwise you sound like a machine. Johnny Smith picked from the elbow; most people use the wrist as the focus of control; Pasquale focuses on the P and I to get the most control.

    So, what am I really saying? PASQUALE is the MAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!
    Navdeep Singh.

  17. #16

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    Or you could use a thumbpick, the Fred Kelly Bumblebee for example, so as not to give up what you already know about fingerstyle but have the ability to grip it like a flatpick when that's the sound you want: Lenny Breau, Lorne Lofsky, etc.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcjazz View Post
    Or you could use a thumbpick, the Fred Kelly Bumblebee for example, so as not to give up what you already know about fingerstyle but have the ability to grip it like a flatpick when that's the sound you want: Lenny Breau, Lorne Lofsky, etc.
    I actually tried that a couple years ago. Didn't like it, didn't feel natural as far as the thumb pick was concerned (I used a banjo thumb pick), the tone was lacking, and, moreover, at this point, I think a flatpick, with its natural up-down pendulum feel and essence would be faster, more clean and more articulate for singe-note lines.

    The trick, from a technical point of view, is to seamlessly switch from lines to block chords to intervals to strummed *arpeggiated* chords. That's why I think it's vital to not maintain the pick at a similar angle all the time--it should be context specific, depending on if it's executing a downstroke-upstroke-chord-interval, etc.

    I've spent the last few days getting some preliminary technical work done--even at work, when I'm away from the guitar, I'll hold a pick and practice the basic tactile dexterity of the pick and fingers virtually playing a four-note block chord. It's coming along. I feel excited about it. Naturally, it won't really come together in full until I've developed the basic nail on the C finger (pinky).
    Navdeep Singh.

  19. #18

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    NSJ, sounds like you might find the Chuck Wayne approach to picking interesting. He wrote several volumes on playing jazz guitar including a hybrid picking style that could be used for classical type playing. The structure of his chord forms, picking technique, etc., was quite developed. Unfortunately I haven't found any good videos showings right hand technique in action.

    And of course watching Ed Bickert videos can be helpful in terms of watching a very smooth, relaxed hybrid picker in action.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  20. #19

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    A modified thumb pick strategy I find useful:

    1.Cut the tip and file it so it is short (~3-4 mm).
    2.For better upstrokes and for long single note lines, grasp the thumbpick with your index finger (or index and middle finger)
    3.For classical style, slide the thumb pick back slightly (with your index and middle fingers) and use your thumb/thumbnail.
    -----------------------------------

    "The instrument keeps me humble. Sometimes I pick it up and it seems to say, "No, you can't play today." I keep at it anyway, though." Jim Hall

  21. #20
    I comp a lot on electric using hybrid picking. The sound I hear in my head is that of Ed Bickert. I wish I'd been practicing guitar on the occasions I got to play with Ed. It was always big band gigs where I was playing saxophone.

    I like the immediate, non-arpeggiated response from comping with hybrid picking. The single note lines with the pick pop out nicely, so when I use this technique, I don't have to mess with the guitar volume all the time.

  22. #21

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    Been mostly using thumb recently, but this thread inspired me to use Pasquale's grip with a D'Andrea teardrop on Tele tonight. I'm pleased with the sound and I'm going to keep at it.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    c finger is very useful. from an engineering standpoint, the more points of contact, the more possibilities. if you want to really get into hybrid styles, pick and 3 digits are better and easier in the long run. I'm reasonably sure that pianists use 10 digits. Should we tell them that's too many?
    I agree. The more fingers you can use then the more playing options you can incorporate. Not easy using the pinky finger though. It can feel alien to players using it for the first time and it may not be as mobile as other picking fingers. Albert Lee uses the all fingers technique......and very good he sounds too.

  24. #23

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    If it hasn't already been stated, pace yourself when introducing the RH pinky. If you haven't used it before, it's not ready to be shredding with the rest of them and it's easy to encounter strain issues if you ask it to do too much too quickly.

  25. #24

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    Although I'm pretty new to hybrid picking, I am a long-time classical/flamenco player, so I have taken the main rule from that practice: go slowly enough so that your brain learns the right moves. In my case, I work alternating in both scale passages and moving between strings (pick-middle, pick-ring, pick little). Doing similar exercises incorporating two RH fingers alternating with pick, then all 3, starting very slowly and working up (using the metronome) has generated good results in only a few weeks. My little finger has come along very well, it seems to be more independent and flexible than the "a" finger, in fact. I'm working out a routine of several exercises done for about 15 minutes each, increasing the metronome speed on a daily basis rather than with each repetition; this is the best way to get the movements etched into your brain without practicing mistakes.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    Although I'm pretty new to hybrid picking, I am a long-time classical/flamenco player, so I have taken the main rule from that practice: go slowly enough so that your brain learns the right moves. In my case, I work alternating in both scale passages and moving between strings (pick-middle, pick-ring, pick little). Doing similar exercises incorporating two RH fingers alternating with pick, then all 3, starting very slowly and working up (using the metronome) has generated good results in only a few weeks. My little finger has come along very well, it seems to be more independent and flexible than the "a" finger, in fact. I'm working out a routine of several exercises done for about 15 minutes each, increasing the metronome speed on a daily basis rather than with each repetition; this is the best way to get the movements etched into your brain without practicing mistakes.
    This sounds positive.Think I'll stick with this style a bit longer.

  27. #26

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    I've switched picks to the Clayton teardrops, come in gauges from very thin (.63mm) to pretty heavy (1.52mm), and I'm finding that on the nylon, 1.26 sounds like my thumbnail, while on the electric 1.00 works very well. Also, some of the easier studies by Aguado, Sor and Giuliani, along with the Villa-Lobos Etude #1 can really help to get the balance between the plectrum and the MAC fingers. I do the Villa-Lobos three ways: thumb and MAC, Hybrid, and pick only, excellent workout. I have set no goals except to move the metronome up 3 clicks every week, but the progress is very steady and noticeable among my bandmates. There is a very good Tim Lerch video above on right-hand "attitudes" for plectrum, hybrid and fingerstyle playing that's worth looking at.

  28. #27

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    It’s gotten better but it still doesn’t feel as natural as 100% finger style. I think the act of physically holding the pick still has a bit too much tension. One issue that I’ve located is I need to articulate the single note lines in the bass better with the pick, well also learning to mute so they don’t ring out constantly.

    It’s going to take more time.


    Navdeep Singh.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    3 note chords are big.
    I found one of those little "How to play like: Freddy Green" youtube vids. Entirely unmemorable BUT the whole 3 (and even 2) note chord thing was a whole new rabbit hole.
    Edit: yeah I dictated that to my phone, and no I'm not going to fix the mistakes.

  30. #29

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    I like using my fingers quite a bit for comping 4 note chords. I've always used PIMA from my classical playing but wanted to do it hybrid so I wouldn't have to reach for the pick to do lines.

    So for the last month I've been building up my pinky. Pick+MA and C. It's going great. I do 90% of my comping like this now.

    For practice I just comp with Ireal and do a little bit of alternation with A and C (which feels pretty odd,lol). It gets easier as I go.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by DS71 View Post
    I like using my fingers quite a bit for comping 4 note chords. I've always used PIMA from my classical playing but wanted to do it hybrid so I wouldn't have to reach for the pick to do lines.

    So for the last month I've been building up my pinky. Pick+MA and C. It's going great. I do 90% of my comping like this now.

    For practice I just comp with Ireal and do a little bit of alternation with A and C (which feels pretty odd,lol). It gets easier as I go.
    Yep that’s coming along. I think the most difficult voicing to execute correctly The point of view of the C finger is the split voicing, ie, Drop two drop four. Still so much easier and more natural using fingers only but it’s getting better.

    The goal is to have absolute technical freedom to execute moving and flexible one, two, three, four note voicings wherever they are.

    There is a really excellent player out of Portland name Christopher Woitach who chimed in and said this is the absolute best way to play the guitar, and he learned, as did Pasquale, from Chuck Wayne as well. For sure, those three players alone are the ones that convinced me to really change to this technique. I’m really glad I did, there are lots of worts and bumps in the road.

    This is the way to go. Obviously, except on a nylon, I could always go back to PIMA.
    Navdeep Singh.

  32. #31

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    hi guys,
    I have been reading your opinions on hybrid picking with interest.
    having put down the guitar about 7 years ago and picked it up again only 6 months ago,
    I am starting yet again and this time jazz is the order of the day; its a voyage of discovery.
    having got into chord melody I have been finger picking mostly on my new Eastman.
    I decided to give Dirks rendition of Autumn Leaves a go as I liked it very much; very tasty soloing that is a delight to listen to.
    i am into the solo now and still finger-picking it, whereas i think he was hybrid picking up to that point and then presumably the flat picking took over for the single note work. here's my question; is it going to be harder work for me to get a nice fluidity finger picking the single note work or is it entirely possible to finger pick as well as flat pick?
    i could just keep a flat pick close at hand (a JD 3 mm stubby was my pick of choice in my aimless noodling years) and grab it in the almost one bar break between melody and solo, but this seems less than ideal. hybrid picking seems to be a convenient best of both worlds, but...but...but i am becoming an old dog and this is a new trick. i have grown my nails, but am still on round wounds and find that unless i am really on the ball with my angle of attack, the scratchy nature of nails rasping on round wounds is not anywhere near pleasant tonally; the advantage of this is its making me adopt a more classical posture in both raised neck and picking hand.
    any responses gratefully received.
    Aidan-the-noob-jazzer.

  33. #32

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    I don’t know, man but I would say that it takes a long time of consistent practice. I posted that video and that’s after practicing for months so it’s still not natural. I think you have to recognize that it’s not something you can dabble in and whip it out and use it when you need it. It should really become the Swiss Army knife of right-hand a technique that allows you to do everything.

    I concentrate on playing Notes in the soprano register with the fingers while simultaneously playing Notes in the bass with the pick. I just view it as finger style with the pick substituting for the thumb. Maybe some people think if there is some single note lines involved they have to be play with the pick. I don’t agree and try to play single note lines with the pick, with fingers and with both.

    I would maybe recommend you pick up Jack Zucker‘s new book on legato lines he uses hybrid picking exclusively or mostly. Not just pick and fingers but also, importantly, slurs . It’s got over 100 exercises and it is quite good.
    Navdeep Singh.

  34. #33

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    thanks NSJ,
    I will check out that book, despite having enough on my plate, what with catching up on all things jazz at this late stage. I did try a bit of hybrid but it felt very awkward and I quickly gave up. its just a matter of persevering, and I'm sure a book specialising in this skill would help encourage me. perhaps I will give being a quick change artist a go first, and by that I mean see how smoothly I can stop finger-picking and start flat picking (blue tacked somewhere close by-sounds ridiculous but I am sure many a better musician has done something similar, having had their in-hand pick go flying during a performance) .

  35. #34

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    Hi NSJ,
    I am still grappling with the long-term ( to the extent that I have long-term left) picking path. With standard hybrid picking, the obvious downside for me at least, apart from having to gain a whole new way of playing, is the angle of attack of nails on strings of the designated picking fingers while holding the plectrum. Clearly this has been overcome by experienced hybrid pickers but my early attempts seem to result in very unsatisfactory glancing contact between nails and strings...nowhere near acceptable tone. Here's a vid of a guy that combines picking and pleck-ing ( can I get away with that?). I learned yesterday that George Benson does something similar, but more of a tucked- in -the -palm -of -the -hand -until -needed approach. I got into the standard pimac method through the easy guide to chord melody ( there's a brief note about hybrid picking, but left at that.)
    Bye for now.
    Regards from Aidan-the-noob-jazzer


  36. #35

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    Hi Aidan

    If it's any consolation, I have been playing jazz guitar for 30+ years and I have just started attempting hybrid picking, and it's not going very well! I am used to playing either with pick or fingerstyle (I started out with classical guitar so no problem there).

    Like you I am finding the middle, ring and pinky fingers do not pluck the strings nearly so well for some reason (yet using index, middle and ring is fine, when I play fingerstyle). The tone is very weak and unbalanced compared to the pick.

    I think it is just a case of slogging away for as long as it takes, until my hand gets used to it and adapts. This might take months!

    To be honest, I remember it took me a similarly long time to get used to using a pick, way back when I started using one.

  37. #36

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    Jazz Textures - Christopher Woitach - TrueFire

    The above is the true fire course taught by Christopher Woitach

    https://groups.google.com/forum/m/#!...zz/dLYIa_yHYDM


    https://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/atta...icking-jjg-pdf

    I do not think that Taylor’s video is an example of hybrid picking: he switches back exclusively between fingers only and pick only. True hybrid picking means you can use both at the same time, for example the pic maybe playing some bass notes well the fingers play Melody notes on the top strings.

    The people do you want to study are Chuck Wayne, Pasquale grasso and Christopher Woitach .

    Christopher told me personally that he studied chuck’s method to get hybrid picking down . Pascuale has said the same on many videos that he has made. And even studied with someone who studied with Chuck, and Italian musician named Augustino Digorno.
    Navdeep Singh.

  38. #37

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    +1 for another classical guitarist who switched to jazz and fell in love with Pasquale.

    He is my favourite guitarist. Even greater than JP imo

  39. #38

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    Thanks for the links NSJ, I will get to them after this.
    Sorry I didn't make it clearer that I posted the Taylor vid to demonstrate the alternative to hybrid picking, not as an example of hybrid picking which of course it is not. For me it's encouraging to see how deftly he manages to get the best of finger picking and flat picking, simply by a quick flick of the fingers. I guess I am looking for a way out of adopting the hybrid method. I have enough on my plate in terms of practice without making it any more challenging. If I can get good tone, then my practice is more rewarding.

  40. #39

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    Some useful stuff about hybrid picking in this Tim Lerch video:


  41. #40

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    Tim Miller video. He uses a combination of nail and flesh on the fingers, to match the pick sound.


  42. #41

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    I use flesh and nail as well. Classical background. Just getting the Pinky involved for comping 4 note chords. I've never needed it for classical guitar, but it's great of my comping fingerstyle because I don't have to do anything different with the pick. I can seamlessly go from comping to lines and back again. Getting easier/better all the time.

  43. #42

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    Coming from classical and flamenco, I'm using flesh and nail, with nails well-shaped and polished for a good sound. However, I'm also playing a nylon-strung 7-string guitar, so the classical style is perfect. The steel-string archtop sounds good, though, and I just have to be careful not to pluck too hard so I don't damage the nails. As DS71 says above, it's a very cool way to be able to utilize the speed and swing of the pick style, as well as creating nice arpeggiated or block chords for comping, along with voice-leading moves.

    I do find that the 7-string, having so wide a fingerboard, makes it a little more difficult to use the pick in place of the thumb for bass lines, and I have stuck a pick-holder to the upper side of the guitar so I can quickly stash and retrieve the pick if the situation gets sticky. Eventually I hope to be able to move the pick in between my index and middle fingers without dropping it when using my thumb. I am working from classical studies by Aguado, Sor and Carcassi, as well as Gustavo Assis-Brasil's excellent book and Tim Miller's materials. I have a gig this weekend where my trio will accompany a singer in the Tony Bennett style, and my partners are a drummer and a sax player, so the 7-string and the hybrid techniques will get a workout.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Hi Aidan

    I think it is just a case of slogging away for as long as it takes, until my hand gets used to it and adapts. This might take months!

    To be honest, I remember it took me a similarly long time to get used to using a pick, way back when I started using one.
    I've been working diligently every day for 2-3 hour on it, and I'm 7 months in, just starting to get a good sound and some independence. Tone is a function of nail shape and length, that's still an experiment, but I've managed to get a pretty fat sound out of the little finger by growing the nail out and filing it to shape. Slow arpeggio practice is most important for the kind of control needed, along with pick alternating with diads and triads in the fingers in a variety of rhythmic patterns. Check out Martin Taylor's youtube lesson on walking bass, and try it with the pick, it's fairly easy but can really get you going.

  45. #44

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    I've only been doing it for a couple of weeks now, but just doing a little each day it is starting to feel a bit more natural now and the sound is improving. So definitely worth persevering.

  46. #45

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    I learnt PIMA as a young guitarist, and picked up hybrid picking from that standpoint, shifting it over to accommodate the loss of the index finger independence I found Simon & Garfunkel stuff to be useful ("Sounds of Silence", "I am a Rock", and "The Boxer" especially) useful in learning how to separate my pick from my fingers while still keeping my pinky active.

    If you want to involve your little finger in your playing, there's no way around it but to use it.

  47. #46
    you should try thumbpicks. A friend of mine who plays jazz and classical guitar, Jim Roberts uses a thumbpick on guitar and it works out great.

  48. #47

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    for those classical players trying to get th4 hybrid stuff down, try spending a few minutes each day working on simple arpeggio studies using the thumb and the last 3 fingers: m, a, c. Getting control of those fingers will be easier, and adding the pick then becomes less trouble.