The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #76

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    I don't think Miles would have named a track John McLaughlin if he thought he was a dingus.

    JM probably has some less than amazing recordings. So does Miles, about 15 years worth.

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  3. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by sully75
    I don't think Miles would have named a track John McLaughlin if he thought he was a dingus.

    JM probably has some less than amazing recordings. So does Miles, about 15 years worth.
    I’ve taken to doing recovery runs with In a Silent Way (I can’t help but pick up the pace when Tony opens up on the ride though) and I’m always knocked out by Johns subtle flavourings on that record.

    listening again to his more recent playing after studying a bit of Konnakol it really strikes me how much his picking sounds like Konnakol syllables. (There’s even a Konnakol section on que Allegria iirc.)

    So it’s not so much that he has a ‘stiff’ feel so much as a very Carnatic one, with that very specific type of springy feel that tradition has. In jazz often the guitar lags the beat a little, it’s stylish. JM is right on it. His time and articulation are pretty amazing.

  4. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    I’ve taken to doing recovery runs with In a Silent Way (I can’t help but pick up the pace when Tony opens up on the ride though) and I’m always knocked out by Johns subtle flavourings on that record.

    listening again to his more recent playing after studying a bit of Konnakol it really strikes me how much his picking sounds like Konnakol syllables. (There’s even a Konnakol section on que Allegria iirc.)

    So it’s not so much that he has a ‘stiff’ feel so much as a very Carnatic one, with that very specific type of springy feel that tradition has. In jazz often the guitar lags the beat a little, it’s stylish. JM is right on it. His time and articulation are pretty amazing.
    Yeah. I kinda think JM would be better off not playing straight ahead jazz, I don't think it's his strong point but he's coming from a very unique place and I owe my love for Indian music to him.

    After listening to Shakti since like 1994 it was only 2 years ago that I realized that it's all South Indian based (despite Zakir Hussain being in the band).

    JM on the Miles recordings is so jagged. People saying his playing is really white there...I don't get it. He's pretty funky but he cuts like a knife.

  5. #79

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    Ps do check this out:



    There's a really funny part where the Santur player looks at him during JMs solo with this glowing look of love. The Kanjira player is one of the great ones too Selvaganesh.

  6. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    and I’m always knocked out by Johns subtle flavourings on that record.
    And me! Absolutely love In a Silent Way, and yes JM's playing very much provoked by Miles's koan: Play guitar like you don't know how: and magic ensued...


    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    listening again to his more recent playing after studying a bit of Konnakol it really strikes me how much his picking sounds like Konnakol syllables. (There’s even a Konnakol section on que Allegria iirc.)

    So it’s not so much that he has a ‘stiff’ feel so much as a very Carnatic one, with that very specific type of springy feel that tradition has. In jazz often the guitar lags the beat a little, it’s stylish. JM is right on it. His time and articulation are pretty amazing.
    On Que Alegria it's true there is quite an Indian feel on some tracks; but both JM and his percussionist Trilok Gurtu are equally adept IMO at a swing feel, and IIRC there are a couple of tracks where it breaks down into a blues with swing in addition to the great blues 'One Nite Stand'. He plays a great jazz blues and his picking can sound slippery smooth, swung (esp. with The Free Spirits) or staccato, depending on what sort of feel he's going for.

    Yes, on the what are you listening to thread I posted the above cut from The Cellar Door Sessions when I found out Michael Henderson had died. Unlike you and Keith Jarrett however, I listen to the disks with JM more than the others...

    This is another one of my favourites. It's based around a blues with some interesting substitutions - some day I will figure out what they are, but it sounds like the altered and other melodic minor scales are used a fair amount. In any case it's a barnstorming tour-de-force which takes me on a little trip every time I listen to it...


  7. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by sully75
    Ps do check this out:



    There's a really funny part where the Santur player looks at him during JMs solo with this glowing look of love. The Kanjira player is one of the great ones too Selvaganesh.
    Thanks, listening now.

  8. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    As for Miles’s part in this - he could have had George Benson or the pick of any of the other NYC bebop guys. Clearly he head something in JM that appealed. I think it was that he had one foot in the rock and blues sphere but also had some jazz chops, not that he was a great jazz player.
    Actually Miles did try out George Benson and Joe Beck, he recorded one or two tracks featuring them, but neither of them made much impact. (I think Benson says in his biography that he didn’t have a clue what they were playing!)

    So McLaughlin’s approach must have been what he was looking for.

  9. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Actually Miles did try out George Benson and Joe Beck, he recorded one or two tracks featuring them, but neither of them made much impact. (I think Benson says in his biography that he didn’t have a clue what they were playing!)

    So McLaughlin’s approach must have been what he was looking for.
    Tbf I recall an interview where McLaughlin was equally bemused. I think that was just the gig, Miles wasn’t a fan of explanations.

    I love the track Gb plays on though. 60s miles :-)

    certainly Miles wasn’t much interested in straight jazz guitar; he was hearing Jimi (although maybe not when he auditioned George?)

  10. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by James W
    And me! Absolutely love In a Silent Way, and yes JM's playing very much provoked by Miles's koan: Play guitar like you don't know how: and magic ensued...
    Slightly out of tune E major chord is one of the best moments in music. Can’t teach that at jazz school lol.

    On Que Alegria it's true there is quite an Indian feel on some tracks; but both JM and his percussionist Trilok Gurtu are equally adept IMO at a swing feel, and IIRC there are a couple of tracks where it breaks down into a blues with swing in addition to the great blues 'One Nite Stand'. He plays a great jazz blues and his picking can sound slippery smooth, swung (esp. with The Free Spirits) or staccato, depending on what sort of feel he's going for.
    Yes I know the track you mean and I like it. But really he’s moved away from that vein I think, at least I rarely hear him swinging, but it’s foolish to think that’s not a choice.

    This is another one of my favourites. It's based around a blues with some interesting substitutions - some day I will figure out what they are, but it sounds like the altered and other melodic minor scales are used a fair amount. In any case it's a barnstorming tour-de-force which takes me on a little trip every time I listen to it...

    Well, you better get transcribing eh? (Sorry to be annoying haha.)

  11. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by sully75
    Ps do check this out:



    There's a really funny part where the Santur player looks at him during JMs solo with this glowing look of love. The Kanjira player is one of the great ones too Selvaganesh.
    that’s mega that is. Thanks for posting

  12. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    But really he’s moved away from that vein I think, at least I rarely hear him swinging, but it’s foolish to think that’s not a choice.
    I think these swing - but what do I know?