View Poll Results: What is the max speed at which you can play 16th notes *cleanly* ?

Voters
296. You may not vote on this poll
  • less than 80 bpm

    43 14.53%
  • 80-100 bpm

    34 11.49%
  • 100-120 bpm

    55 18.58%
  • 120-140 bpm

    75 25.34%
  • 140-160 bpm

    34 11.49%
  • 160-180 bpm

    25 8.45%
  • more than 180 bpm

    30 10.14%
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  1. #351

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden View Post
    What about the audience's point of view, do some people prefer to hear slow music, do some prefer to hear fast music and do some like a mixture of both.
    Yes, the audience. I've heard too many greats talk about trying to get a gauge on "the audience.
    It's this concept that makes me think that non jazz guys like John Pettrucci and Yngvie Malmsteen will get paying gigs till the day they die.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #352

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    Quote Originally Posted by AleikhBaba View Post
    hey really dig scott!
    Thanks, man! VERY much appreciate the kind words and that you took the time to listen.
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  4. #353

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    My speeed was really improving a few months ago, but my practice schedule (and chops) has gone down hill since.

    Scott Jones, I'm very impressed!
    Last edited by bobby d; 03-30-2015 at 02:47 PM.

  5. #354

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobby d View Post
    My speeed was really improving a few months ago, but my practice schedule (and chops) has gone down hill since.

    Scott Jones, I'm very impressed!
    Thank you!
    MY FUSION RELEASE "REMEMBER" W THE CARVIN HH2, and MY ORCHESTRAL RELEASE
    https://scottjonesmusic.bandcamp.com/

    MY SET ON SOUNDCLOUD OF VARIOUS STYLES
    https://soundcloud.com/scottjonesmus...-various-short

    MY BLOG
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  6. #355

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    Scott is a demon on guitar Really great compositions too

  7. #356

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    Quote Originally Posted by Koshchei View Post
    Scott is a demon on guitar Really great compositions too
    Thank you!
    MY FUSION RELEASE "REMEMBER" W THE CARVIN HH2, and MY ORCHESTRAL RELEASE
    https://scottjonesmusic.bandcamp.com/

    MY SET ON SOUNDCLOUD OF VARIOUS STYLES
    https://soundcloud.com/scottjonesmus...-various-short

    MY BLOG
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  8. #357

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    I wonder what Jim Hall would say about this topic?

  9. #358

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    Quote Originally Posted by trap View Post
    I wonder what Jim Hall would say about this topic?
    I have a master class DVD of his where he actually jokes about his finger dexterity.
    I had no idea he had such a great sense of humor.

    PS:

    He talks technique here and praises Pat Metheny (technique) and Scofield (Variety of sound)
    He says his technique is in his left hand. Good stuff.
    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 03-11-2016 at 07:35 PM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  10. #359

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    I have a master class DVD of his where he actually jokes about his finger dexterity.
    I had no idea he had such a great sense of humor.

    PS:

    He talks technique here and praises Pat Metheny (technique) and Scofield (Variety of sound)
    He says his technique is in his left hand. Good stuff.
    I bet Metheny and Scofield would have high praise for Jim too! He turned his limitation with chops into a signature sound.

  11. #360

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    Faster than a speeding bullet! Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.... I forget how that Superman refrain for the old Steve Reeves show I watched regularly as a kid goes.

    I like to think I'm as fast as I can be. Sometimes it's true. Sometimes....

    I never calculated how fast I can play. When I watch the latest videos of Pasquale Grasso, I start thinking ...damn! I'm so ...slow.

  12. #361

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    Quote Originally Posted by trap View Post
    I bet Metheny and Scofield would have high praise for Jim too! He turned his limitation with chops into a signature sound.
    In the video posted above. Jim demonstrates some serious speed with his left hand that surprised me.

    He says that he's able to achieve that without much right hand involvement except to strike the string once or twice to get sound as opposed to someone like Di Meola who uses his right hand to strike almost every note he plays.

    This is what I took from the piece posted above about Jim. Again, in the video, he talks about ALWAYS trying to take an idea and then stretching and reinterpreting that idea. I think his technique was ALWAYS in service of his melodic ideas and these ideas mostly didn't involve burning.

    Reminds me of all the folks who drive Porches. 95+% of them will never drive these cars nearly as fast they can go.
    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 03-12-2016 at 07:02 PM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  13. #362

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    In the video posted above. Jim demonstrates some serious speed with his left hand that surprised me.

    He says that he's able to achieve that without much right hand involvement except to strike the string once or twice to get sound as opposed to someone like Di Meola who uses his right hand to strike almost every note he plays.

    This is what I took from the piece posted above about Jim. Again, in the video, he talks about ALWAYS trying to take an idea and then stretching and reinterpreting that idea. I think his technique was ALWAYS in service of his melodic ideas and these ideas mostly didn't involve burning.

    Reminds me of all the folks who drive Porches. 95+% of them will never drive these cars nearly as fast they can go.
    Nice video! Jim was my first influence in jazz guitar. I saw him live in NYC with Ron Carter in a smal club called "The Guitar" . I could almost touch him!!
    being fast is fine but not an end unto itself. But I'm preaching to the choir I'm sure.

  14. #363

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    Pollfail: no I don't care enough to measure option.

  15. #364

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    I can eat an entire pizza in 20 minutes.
    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  16. #365

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    Like HRC says "What Does It Matter?"

  17. #366

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    If technique (aka your voice) is to be employed SOLELY in the service of "speaking/singing" aka soloing or contributing to the song being played, then the esteemed PETER BERNSTEIN effectively puts this argument to rest. This is especially so after listening to Defrancsco's lightning solos that blaze at warp speed!

    I heard this song ("TAKE THE COLTRANE") performed by BOBBY HUTCHERSON, JOEY DEFRANCESCO, PETER BERNSTEIN & BYRON LANHAM on the radio this week. I must confess, it was the first time I'd ever heard this song. The tempo is FAST. It blazes!! And what does Peter do? He times his solos. Nothing really fast but so in the POCKET, funky (if I may use the term in this context) and his use of SPACE is just sweet!

    A while back, I would have thought that this tempo needed fleet fingers playing at a blur to keep up but Peter goes the other way. How fast is he playing, He plays some relatively fast passages but that's so not the point. He uses the rhythm to his advantage and rides the waves like an experienced surfer would. Rhythm and Melody, indivisible in the eyes of whatever it is that gave us music!

    Check it out. I think its a blast but what do I know? ;-)

    Don't want to listen to the whole song? Scroll to the 3:40 mark to jump to Peter's solo.

    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 08-31-2016 at 02:38 PM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  18. #367

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    I prefer oration, not auctioneering.

  19. #368

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    If technique (aka your voice) is to be employed SOLELY in the service of "speaking/singing" aka soloing or contributing to the song being played, then the esteemed PETER BERNSTEIN effectively puts this argument to rest. This is especially so after listening to Defrancsco's lightning solos that blaze at warp speed!

    I heard this song ("TAKE THE COLTRANE") performed by BOBBY HUTCHERSON, JOEY DEFRANCESCO, PETER BERNSTEIN & BYRON LANHAM on the radio this week. I must confess, it was the first time I'd ever heard this song. The tempo is FAST. It blazes!! And what does Peter do? He times his solos. Nothing really fast but so in the POCKET, funky (if I may use the term in this context) and his use of SPACE is just sweet!

    A while back, I would have thought that this tempo needed fleet fingers playing at a blur to keep up but Peter goes the other way. How fast is he playing, He plays some relatively fast passages but that's so not the point. He uses the rhythm to his advantage and rides the waves like an experienced surfer would. Rhythm and Melody, indivisible in the eyes of whatever it is that gave us music!

    Check it out. I think its a blast but what do I know? ;-)

    Don't want to listen to the whole song? Scroll to the 3:40 mark to jump to Peter's solo.

    Love it! There's another good version of that tune (also with Joey D. playing) on Pat Martino's Live at Yoshi's disc. (Although Pat definitely takes the machine gun approach).

    I've come to accept the fact that my muscles will never twitch as fast as some other peoples'. I can hold my own at fairly brisk tempi, but I prefer a somewhat more relaxed pace. *


    *Someone told me last week that what he liked about my playing was how relaxed it felt. Listening back to some of my rehearsal recordings, I can see what he meant, and I'm going to try to develop that feel.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  20. #369

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    fast doesn't last..but when you're slow, you can blow


    one of the great hindu masters of gharana vocals..pandit pran nath stretched notes endlessly..his goal was to perfect the individual note and harmonize with the universe

    whats the hurry?

    cheers

  21. #370

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    fast doesn't last..but when you're slow, you can blow


    one of the great hindu masters of gharana vocals..pandit pran nath stretched notes endlessly..his goal was to perfect the individual note and harmonize with the universe

    whats the hurry?

    cheers
    I think I'm going to use this next time someone calls Cherokee

  22. #371

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    well there's a place for everything and everything in its place

    the point being dont waste'm, make every one count..despite the tempo

    a computer can do 360 + bpm..but who wants to listen?

    and remember you can only go so fast before it all becomes one again

    cheers

  23. #372

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    a computer can do 360 + bpm..but who wants to listen?
    Based on the popularity of EDM, I'd say a lot of people.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  24. #373

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    I tried about a year ago to get the head to Donna Lee to come out fast enough to sound right. I couldn't do it. I would like to try again since I have been playing alot in the meantime.

  25. #374

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    Quote Originally Posted by Binyomin View Post
    I tried about a year ago to get the head to Donna Lee to come out fast enough to sound right. I couldn't do it. I would like to try again since I have been playing alot in the meantime.
    I can play it at a pretty brisk clip. Maybe not as fast as some people like to play it, but fast enough to make a casual listener say, "hey, that's fast". It's tricky, but I found some hammer-on/pull-off fingerings that take some of the pressure off my right hand. Give it another shot. It's full of great bop licks.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  26. #375

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Joe View Post
    Based on the popularity of EDM, I'd say a lot of people.
    I love EDM. Specifically DRUM AND BASS. You can find some really amazing rhythms and grooves in that sub genre. I can't wait to hear jazz tunes done in EDM... and using the Peter Bernstein approach to soloing. Bluesy and riding the rhythm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Binyomin View Post
    I tried about a year ago to get the head to Donna Lee to come out fast enough to sound right. I couldn't do it. I would like to try again since I have been playing alot in the meantime.
    Keep at it. This is exactly how I felt when I started learning how to play SPAIN about 4 years ago. It took me a while to play the head comfortably in one position. Still something didn’t feel right and so out of desperation, I decided to learn it in 3 other positions. Eventually I realized that I the original position that I taught myself was the 2nd hardest position in which to play it. The 2nd position attempt ended up being the easiest in which to play the song. Now I use the most difficult position only as a dexterity exercise of sorts. I can’t even play it without warming up. I always default to the easiest position when playing it with other musicians.

    For inspiration, here’s an old video of PHISH playing Donna Lee. You can tell Trey is using a linear approach by playing as many notes as he can on a single string. Maybe you might like that approach.



    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpalumpacus View Post
    I prefer oration, not auctioneering.
    Trademark this. Fast! ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Joe View Post
    Love it! There's another good version of that tune (also with Joey D. playing) on Pat Martino's Live at Yoshi's disc. (Although Pat definitely takes the machine gun approach).

    I've come to accept the fact that my muscles will never twitch as fast as some other peoples'. I can hold my own at fairly brisk tempi, but I prefer a somewhat more relaxed pace. *


    *Someone told me last week that what he liked about my playing was how relaxed it felt. Listening back to some of my rehearsal recordings, I can see what he meant, and I'm going to try to develop that feel.
    There is a Mike Stern lesson where he talks about technique and how some players who don’t have speed find ways to compensate. Basically, they play to their strengths. He talks about really struggling with soloing and playing jazz when he first started. He says it didn't come easily for him like it did for Pat Metheny who was playing at an advanced level by the time he was 20. What Stern didn't say (but (I picked up on it) was that he had to work really hard at it to be able to play. You’re on to something with the relaxed feel. You’re lucky someone pointed that out to you. Play to your strengths.
    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 09-01-2016 at 02:30 PM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  27. #376

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    You’re on to something with the relaxed feel. You’re lucky someone pointed that out to you. Play to your strengths.
    Indeed, however, as I discovered at rehearsal last night, A) you can't will yourself to play relaxed, and B) it's harder to play relaxed at higher tempos. (In hindsight, my having a relaxed feel shouldn't be all that surprising. One of my first guitar inspirations was Mark Knopfler. He's a pretty relaxed-playing dude himself.)
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  28. #377

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    For inspiration, here’s an old video of PHISH playing Donna Lee.
    Holy crap! I was at that show!
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  29. #378

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Joe View Post
    Holy crap! I was at that show!
    NO WAY!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Joe View Post
    Indeed, however, as I discovered at rehearsal last night, A) you can't will yourself to play relaxed, and B) it's harder to play relaxed at higher tempos. (In hindsight, my having a relaxed feel shouldn't be all that surprising. One of my first guitar inspirations was Mark Knopfler. He's a pretty relaxed-playing dude himself.)
    Knopfler is the best! I really worked on my finger style listening to his stuff (andwith Chet Atkins).

    Funnily, enough. I’ve heard Jim Hall say that internalizing the song till you know the way it flows down cold is huge. And then using space where you play a fragment on the say the 1st beat allow the music to flow some and then expand on the fragment. A combination of practicing this approach and knowing the song backwards helps you stay as relaxed as possible. However, sometimes the groove just takes you away and then I guess you’re truly in improvising territory.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  30. #379

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    NO WAY!!!
    Yeah. Paradise Rock Club in Boston. It was either the first or second time I saw them. Before they were the phenomenon they are now. I know a lot of people who think their best period was the mid 90s, but I don't think they've ever been better than they were in '89. Young and hungry.

    I play Donna Lee more or less in one position. (Moves a fret or two in either direction, but generally down around 3rd position.) It makes the chordal fragments very clear.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  31. #380

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    I had no idea Phish could approach jazz like that.

  32. #381

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpalumpacus View Post
    I had no idea Phish could approach jazz like that.
    They're terrific players, who've chosen to focus on the jam-rock thing. Trey studied composition, and went through a period of learning jazz standards and jazz techniques. He doesn't consider himself a jazz player, but he's no slouch. Mike Gordon (the bassist) does a lot of bluegrass stuff, and plays with Leo Kottke in a duet format.

    Back in the late 80s/early 90s, they sounded a lot different than they do now, and I don't think they've ever equaled that sound. When they started to get famous, they also got a little lazy (Then, of course, drugs beyond the usual pot and acid started creeping into the scene. Trey develop an opiate habit, but they were all doing a lot of E, and other stuff, and between that and the laziness, they kind of stopped practicing and advancing.)

    But those late 80s shows were a huge moment in my life. I imagine it's like what seeing Hendrix and Clapton in London in, say, '67 was like for a lot of people. I had no idea you could play like that in a rock context. Seeing that inspired me to move beyond the blues and simple rock stuff I was doing, which eventually let me to try to learn jazz. My original purpose in learning jazz was to try to approach that style. Then, of course, I got seduced by jazz itself, and, well, here I am. (My standard joke when people ask me why I play jazz is, "I set out to become a rock star, but I screwed up and became a musician instead.")
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  33. #382

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    Ha! That phish clip. I've never seen so many drums on stage during a jazz standard.

    I was into phish back in high school. Definitely changed how I thought about the guitar.

    Incidentally, Donna Lee has been part of my warmup since high school as well.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  34. #383

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    Picking aid alert (since picks can greatly slow or speed up your technique).
    I recently discovered these picks. I ended up getting them online because they cost more at my local guitar shop (they sell them as singles instead of 12 packs). I was using ULTEX picks which are great (grip and slippage on the strings without too much choking between strings). These offer the stiffness and just enough flex in them. For those who like stiff picks I'd start at .63mm. The 50mm is interesting. It's the best combination of stiff and flexible. Interesting picks I think. Technology.. Ch, Ch, Ch, Changing!

    Clayton Acetal Rounded Triangle Picks 12-pack .50mm | Sweetwater.com


    Dunlop Ultex Tri Picks, .60mm, 6-Pack
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  35. #384

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    If anyone is interested I was just featured on the jazz guitar site fretdojo.com where I presented a workshop on speed playing for jazz guitarists. Here's the link:

    Slaying The Speed Demon: Speed Picking Secrets for Jazz Guitar

    Stu

  36. #385
    I cannot play fast anymore, since a wrist injury ,10 years ago,due to too much speed, that let me not playing for 3 month .So ,for me,uptempos are gone!
    Bye bye Donna Lee
    HB
    "you approach harmony in a unique way.Very original,and the more I listen to your posts,the more I appreciating it."
    Chris Whiteman,professor of jazz music,University of Miami

  37. #386

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    Keep at it.
    Thanks (to you and others) for the encouragement. I just tried something I've been meaning to do for a while. I printed out the page with Donna Lee from the Bb Real Book. It came out in Bb (Doesn't that mean it comes out in C for a Bb instrument? What happened to Ab?). Anyway, Bb seems to sit easier on the guitar. Let's see how this goes....

  38. #387

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    Ab, Bb, ... shouldn't it be just the same on guitar, as long as you do not hit open strings. Maybe you play it octave lower than sax/ trumpet do it originally?

    BTW, I managed to memorize the 24 bars and can play them at about 1/2 original tempo (120bpm). Luckily, there's total of several bars of silence, pretty easy to memorize, . 8 bars more and I can start working on speed, though I doubt I will ever make it past 160bpm.
    ^ ^ ^
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  39. #388

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan View Post
    ... though I doubt I will ever make it past 160bpm.
    I was wrong. Currently @ 168bpm and rising .... 180 does not seem very far (for memorized head of Donna Lee without much phrasing and finesse.) .
    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  40. #389

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    Quote Originally Posted by Binyomin View Post
    Thanks (to you and others) for the encouragement. I just tried something I've been meaning to do for a while. I printed out the page with Donna Lee from the Bb Real Book. It came out in Bb (Doesn't that mean it comes out in C for a Bb instrument? What happened to Ab?). Anyway, Bb seems to sit easier on the guitar. Let's see how this goes....
    When you finger a C on a tenor sax, the note it plays actually sounds as a Bb. That's what is meant by a 'Bb instrument'.

    So when they play Donna Lee from this book, it will actually be heard in Ab.

  41. #390

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    Probably not too. But what kind of question is that? What does it have to do with music?

    Shee-it...

  42. #391

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    Quote Originally Posted by fasstrack View Post
    Probably not too. But what kind of question is that? What does it have to do with music?

    Shee-it...
    If I may be so bold to ask for clarification. Re: What kind of question is that? Are you referring to the subject matter. It's so that I can better chew on your repartee.

    (Flatbush, Brooklyn. Bay Terrrace, Staten Island)!
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  43. #392

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    Quote Originally Posted by West LA Jazz View Post
    Are you referring to the subject matter.
    (Flatbush, Brooklyn. Bay Terrrace, Staten Island)!
    Yes...

  44. #393

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    Quote Originally Posted by yaclaus View Post
    Speed is such a difficult thing. I don´t want to practice technique exclusively, but I´m definitely not satisfied with my speed. I can do a d-major scale up and down in 16ths at 140 tops. I´ve played for many years and do have moments where I think - "will my technique ever improve?"
    I've been told by working Jazzers you can gain the same dexterity by practicing/internalizing melodies that appeal to your ear that aren't necesarily scales. These often end up being part of your jazz vocabulary. So you practice the head of DONNA LEE you can break it up and execute fragments in just about everything you play and make it sound different, fresh and dare I say original.

    I have some Bireli tutorials and he talks about how he had an organized regimen of practice when he first started out. He also mentions that he put in a tremendous amount of work (hours logged) to internalize what he played and the fluidity with which he plays passages. He also talks about getting musical inspiration from everywhere including American country, funk and classical violin pieces.

    MEDLEY / DONNA LEE
    By Bireli Lagrene and Jaco Pastorius

    Scroll to 4.40 mark for the start of DONNA LEE melody



    JACO VIDEO – Some great Jaco musical ideas that can be used as improvising tools that a guitarist can also use as finger dexterity practice.

    (At approximately 15.20 Jaco talks about teaching guys this two octave triad which Bireli also uses in his playing. I’ve found it to be a useful phrase that can greatly help your dexterity and also be employed while improvising).

    Jaco used the phrase at the 6.45 point in the DONNA LEE medley above. Pretty cool.

    In his tutorials, Bireli talks about meeting Jaco at 19 and learning so much from him.

    At the 28.00 mark. JACO SAYS IT TOOK HIM (GET THIS) 9 YEARS TO FULLY LEARN DONNA LEE.

    To that I say WOW!!!




    You can use this site to rip the audio to the video.
    http://www.youtube-mp3.org/


    PIANO INSPIRATION: Mirror image dexterity exercise inspiration
    (CHICK COREA)


    Scroll to 5.00 point for the mirror image ideas and passages. The 6.00 point more minus the discussion.


    I’ve heard guitarists use short sections of this while improvising with great effect. It can really take the ear of the listener by surprise. Only thing is we guitarists are doing this with one hand. Take away is you can make a mirror image out of any complex melody that you love and make it sound different and strengthen your hand.


    Finally, Chick Corea has a workshop video that talks about creating his own scales. Taking pieces of interesting melodies, committing them to memory and use them by stretching them out in repeating motifs. The video is locked on his workshop site otherwise I would share. But I’m sure you get the drift.



    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 09-16-2016 at 03:17 PM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  45. #394

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    MIKE STERN says don't beat yourself up in your search for YOUR version of speed and complexity..





    This is worth watching again.... it's regarding the technique that gets you wherever your "there" is.

    "Technique (speed etc) is the players "letters in the alphabet" but it's not the poetry" - Steve Vai

    https://truefire.com/steve-vai-guita...e/watch/v34050
    Last edited by West LA Jazz; 09-22-2016 at 08:30 AM.
    You can't analyze something you can't play! (Robert Conti)

    Technique is the means to play just like your voice is your means to speak. (Robert Conti)

  46. #395

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan View Post
    I was wrong. Currently @ 168bpm and rising .... 180 does not seem very far (for memorized head of Donna Lee without much phrasing and finesse.) .
    180 - no sweat
    200 - almost
    210 - i think will be possible, but only time will show.

    Again, all mechanic, no phrasing, no dynamics, almost strictly alternate ... Donna Lee starting top E string 15th frett ...
    ^ ^ ^
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  47. #396

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    Basically, I'm pretty slow! Another advantage of getting into the senior years… you're not expected to be a fast flippin' guitar player. I like ballads.

  48. #397

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan View Post
    180 - no sweat
    200 - almost
    210 - i think will be possible, but only time will show.

    Again, all mechanic, no phrasing, no dynamics, almost strictly alternate ... Donna Lee starting top E string 15th frett ...
    Still @ 180 almost 200 in higher octave
    Also @ 180 almost 200 in lower octave

    Can do it @ 200 combining the 2 octaves, for easiness factor.
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  49. #398

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    I used to be able to play mechanical exercises at 180bpm 16th notes, 200bpm at a push, but haven't done that for years, and would have to work my way up to it now, mainly as there are other more useful things to do.

    i.e. how fast can you play every other octave within each of all 5 CAGED patterns of an altered scale up and down the fret-board?....as in not going fully up and down all 5 patterns in one go, but instead skipping every other octave within each pattern (played continuously), meaning you sometimes skip over 4 - 5 strings. Would be a while before I could do that at 180bpm 16ths!

  50. #399

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    How fast should you play the Tennessee Waltz?

  51. #400

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    16ths at 200 eh? Hmm, I'm gonna have to put in a few more hours of speed training to catch up to you guys.

    Say, while we're on the subject, does anyone here think that typing "thequickbrownfoxjumpsoverhtelazydog" about a thousand times at world record pace will make me a better poet?