The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Sky my man,
    Like you, I care DEEPLY about keeping my babies moisturized in the winter. I have 2 evaporative humidifiers, the;
    AIRCARE Digital Whole-House Console-Style Evaporative Humidifier (Copper Night) and the
    AIRCARE Space-Saver Evaporative Whole House Humidifier (2,300 sq ft)

    Ive been using them for a few years now. Only one at a time. But last year I was put off by how quickly mold tends to "Bloom" in the wicks. Not to mention the filters are not cheap at about $25/mnth. This has led me to looking into the Venta Airwasher. You mentioned you have one. I love the concept. Can you tell me (us) about it? I know they are expensive ($400-500 range). I know they dont use wicks. But they do use an antibacterial type of solution, which is not cheap... And they require weekly maintenance and daily refilling, (which I am cool with). But do they work? Do they provide the right environment for my babies?
    One other thing to note, I have really old single pane windows in this house and most of the moisture generated by my AIRCARE units end up as condensation on my windows! I wonder if that would be any different with the Venta.
    Sorry to be so needy and ask so many questions. But now that I have all these nice guitars again, I want to make sure I keep them all MINT!

    Thank You Sky!
    I have a few Ventas that I picked up from thrift stores for under $10 each. I also managed to score a bunch of antibacterial packs at the same time.
    they work fine but you really need to use distilled water in them, if you use tap water they'll leave a fine white dust on everything in the room.

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  3. #27

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    Joe, hey my friend.
    I like the Venta. The antibacterial they sell is a weak Quaternary ammonia. Typically used for sanitizing food contact surfaces. I think it's used in restaurants, cafeterias, and kitchens' industrial dishwashers maybe.

    I like the Venta because there are no wicks. And I did get a larger version. We don't have forced air. We have radiant hydronic floors. It can be like a dessert in here during heating season. Even with it, and Vornado, and house plants, it barely keeps us at 30.

    Those Vornado wicks are tough. Especially with any minerals. You're right. I've tried soaking them in citric acid, and get an extra use but they're a pain. With fresh wicks they're great.

    The best solution I've found is taking over the small spare bedroom as a guitar room. It's manageable. Takes a very small humidifier that hardly uses any water. The guitars are happy bro!

  4. #28

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  5. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by skykomishone
    Joe, hey my friend.
    I like the Venta. The antibacterial they sell is a weak Quaternary ammonia. Typically used for sanitizing food contact surfaces. I think it's used in restaurants, cafeterias, and kitchens' industrial dishwashers maybe.

    I like the Venta because there are no wicks. And I did get a larger version. We don't have forced air. We have radiant hydronic floors. It can be like a dessert in here during heating season. Even with it, and Vornado, and house plants, it barely keeps us at 30.

    Those Vornado wicks are tough. Especially with any minerals. You're right. I've tried soaking them in citric acid, and get an extra use but they're a pain. With fresh wicks they're great.

    The best solution I've found is taking over the small spare bedroom as a guitar room. It's manageable. Takes a very small humidifier that hardly uses any water. The guitars are happy bro!
    That’s what I do.
    My guitars are in a small bedroom/office 13x11. In the winter, either one of my humidifiers does the job nicely. But I’m always trying to find something better.
    Maybe I’ll just suck it up and spend $100 per year on filters for 4 years and when we get our retirement house, I will have the one installed in the furnace.
    We had one in my old house. The problem was, our main ducts were made of some spongey material that soaked up the moisture. This unit only lasted a couple of months and then while investigating the problem, a tech showed us all the black mold growing in the vents. $3,000 later we had galvanized ducts and I was afraid to get another furnace type humidifier. I’ve been in a house that had one installed where the owner kept the humidity at 60 degrees! And in the middle of the winter it felt every bit of 60% humidity. My babies would have loved living there.
    Thank you sky. This is an excellent topic. One that is overlooked most of the time. Just looked at all the checked nitrocellulose lacquer guitars in the world. There’s proof.
    Wintermoon, $10 for a Venta? Nice deal. Maybe I need to visit thrift stores more often!
    JD

  6. #30

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    60% is on the higher side, I'd recommend around 40%

  7. #31

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    Mold thrives around 55% or over, and houses are more expensive than guitars


    Skickat från min iPad med Tapatalk

  8. #32

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    "In-case" humidifiers are marginal, at best, although I use them in all my guitar cases. The Bovedas are fine but lose their moisture too quickly, for me, and are costly for how long they last. The D'Addario's(for CG's/Acoustics) with the sponge inside are better but must be monitored every other day if your house is continually air-conditioned(35-45% relative humidity) as we do in the Tropics. In my EG, I use an old plastic film canister with holes drilled and a simple piece of kitchen sponge wetted with distilled water and it has worked well for 56 years. So, based on my experience: I like 50% +/- relative humidity because, in my opinion, 40% is a marginal number and lower RH numbers in the right conditions could damage your guitar while 60% definitely deadens the sound of an all-wood instrument and has potential damage to headstocks swelling/cracking to effect CG tuners/rollers. 50% is my sweet spot. One last thing: I like to keep my instruments stable and while practicing back to back--2 one-hour sessions with a 20 minutes break, I leave my instrument in its stand so the sound/tuning stays stable. Once finished, it is returned to its case. I hope this helps someone.
    Marinero

  9. #33

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    Just an FYI, the friend whose house was set to 60% didn’t have a guitar in it.
    I am well aware the 60% humidity is exorbitant. No worries.
    Anyone else here use a Venta to humidify their guitar rooms?
    JD

  10. #34

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    For my Taylor flat tops I installed their internal hygrometer and use the D’Addario, made by Boveda?, humidipacks here in dry gulch Phoenix. I like the dry air so I moved here and won’t go whole house humidifiers. The device tracks humidity, temperature and has an accelerometer to record impacts. Gives hourly, daily or monthly averages.
    Attached Images Attached Images Good Humidifiers?-4707b285-6fb6-4767-99b0-1c611603f951-jpeg 

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    60% is on the higher side, I'd recommend around 40%
    Thanks for this info. The 15'x10' Room I keep my archtop guitarts in stays between 40&50% humitity year round. I life in the Sacramento Valley Delta, near the Sacramento River in California. I keep plastic shoe containers full of distilled water with wet painters sponges in the room & use Boveda 49% size 8 packs. I might have been overly concerned when I ask my original question, but I ended up learning much.

    Thanks again to everyone.

    Eddie