The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #26

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    Nice find! And if you mean less than 1/10th the price of say an L48 I'm officially going to have to be envious!
    Quote Originally Posted by littleknicky
    The bridge had slots that were terribly deep and the high e and b strings were choking. After [...] filling in the string slots using the baking soda/super glue trick, the guitar now sings!
    Nice work, you can hardly see it! Did you follow a video/tutorial how to do this with a wooden saddle, or just your common sense (or experience)? I'm going to have to do this too, sooner rather than later.

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  3. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by RJVB
    Nice find! And if you mean less than 1/10th the price of say an L48 I'm officially going to have to be envious!


    Nice work, you can hardly see it! Did you follow a video/tutorial how to do this with a wooden saddle, or just your common sense (or experience)? I'm going to have to do this too, sooner rather than later.

    Thanks!

    I just packed the deep slots with baking soda and put a drop of superglue on top. The superglue wicks into the baking soda and I then let it dry for maybe 20-30min. I had to do this two times for one of the deeper slots. If I had to do it over again, I would have used some sawdust instead of superglue (perhaps from sanding the bottom of the bridge a little bit), as you can tell it's not matching if you look closely in person. The only thing I would be careful of is not making a mess with the superglue. You can always file away/sand what you have added, but cleaning up lots of glue can get you into a sticky situation.

  4. #28

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    Thanks. In the meantime I've done my own slot - twice. Both time I used a low-tack take to mask of as much as possible while leaving only the slot exposed. The 1st time I used bone dust and must have missed a bit of the tape that have gotten into the slot because the filling came loose on one end. The 2nd time I used baking soda and was more careful with the tape. In both cases I had slipped a double layer of paper kitchen towel under the saddle, to catch any spills.

    I think next time I'll use baking soda immediately. Where bone or wood dust will simply act as a matrix, I think the baking soda could also react chemically with the glue, leading to something that according to StewMac is as hard as glass. That's good enough for me.

    Re: chemistry: I used an old chemists' trick my father taught me ages ago to apply the dust/soda: a piece of paper with a sharp fold. That gives you a fine make-shift spout on the paper that acts as a receiver for the dust you're creating; much easier than using tiny spoons IMHO.

  5. #29

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    I used cyanoacrylate and baking soda for years, but now I prefer, by far, UV resin. It cures as hard, but not until it's hit with UV light. Until then, it stays a somewhat thick liquid. It can be wiped off, some removed, more added, until you're ready to cure it. It's transparent, so hard to see in a slot. Some filing may be needed to get the slot to the perfect depth, but no need for any filing outside the slot, because you can easily remove everything outside the slot with a tissue or paper towel before curing. UV lights are readily available for very little money, and some kits come with a UV flashlight. If no UV light is available, the sun provides UV for free. I get my resin from ebay, but it's available in many places, such as hobby stores and of course Amazon if you care to buy there. I don't, but I'm not religious about it.