The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #1

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    Are there 4 generations of Henriksen amps: JazzAmp (3 generations) and Bud/Blu? What are the differences between the generations? Which one do you prefer and why?
    Last edited by Tal_175; 07-03-2022 at 08:05 AM.

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  3. #2

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    There have been two generations of just the Bud 6 and Blu 6 (and then came the Bud 10 and Blu 10).

    I have owned both the original Bud 6 and the later version. The first Bud 6 was about 17 lbs; the second version is about 12 lbs. The back panel is slightly changed, although both versions have the same jacks and switches on the back panel.

    The other major change in the second version (besides lighter weight) is the addition of bluetooth. There is a switch on the top panel to turn it on and off; the aux jack remains.

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ukena
    There have been two generations of just the Bud 6 and Blu 6 (and then came the Bud 10 and Blu 10).

    I have owned both the original Bud 6 and the later version. The first Bud 6 was about 17 lbs; the second version is about 12 lbs. The back panel is slightly changed, although both versions have the same jacks and switches on the back panel.

    The other major change in the second version (besides lighter weight) is the addition of bluetooth. There is a switch on the top panel to turn it on and off; the aux jack remains.
    Thanks. I see, so the Bud/Blu series had only two versions (I think the originals were class A/B, later ones are class D hence the weight difference).

    The Bud and Blu replaced the JazzAmp models. JazzAmps had 10 and 12 inch versions but they also went through changes over the years. I've heard people refer to the original JazzAmp and the later revisions as 1st generation, 2nd generation etc.

    I have never owned a Henriksen but I've used different models over the years. I'm interested in buying a used one so I'm also curious about the differences between these older (JazzAmp) versions as well.

  5. #4

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    The older jazzamps had several variations. The first 10" Jazzamp ( which i owned) was 60w, and I think there was a 12" variant. Both these had no reverb, and there were some teething problems with hum and switch popping. The 12" variant was originally aimed at bassists as well as guitarists. After a year or so, the power was increased to 120W for both 10 and 12" versions.
    About that time a separate 120W head was marketed, and was also available as a "convertible" amp - ie piggy-back outfit, with head and speaker cab.
    Reverb was ( reluctantly) added by Bud H around that time. A couple of years later I think, Hendriksen briefly marketing a "bluesamp", which was a standard jazzamp 10 fitted with an Eminence Ragin Cajun speaker. The Ragin Cajun was only rated at 75 watts, but apparently survived the 120W that the power section put out. The Bluesamp wasn't very successful in the market, and didn't last long. All these "Jazzamps" were "conventional" or class AB power units, with heavier weight and heatsinks as part of the amp units.

    After the introduction of the Blu amp, as part of the Bud and Blu series that replaced the Jazzamp line, Hendriksen experimented with a Class D power unit, which is lighter and requires no heatsink. It's sometimes called a 'digital" power amp, although in fact it is also a form of analogue amp like the previous class AB power amps. The experiment was successful, and AFAIK all Bud and Blu amps have now adopted class D power, with the resultant benefits of lower weight and less heat. Hendriksen was a comparatively late entry to using Class D amps: Acoustic Image amps in the US have been pioneering Class D amps for at least a decade, as have smaller amp makers in Europe and elsewhere.

    There are two features of Hendriksen Amps that have remained constant over the years; they are the graphic equaliser form of tone control, and the use of Eminence Beta speakers ( actually a 250W PA speaker) and sometimes, separate "tweeters", apart from the one experiment with the "bluesamp". In that way, the "Hendriksen sound" has stayed fairly consistent over the years.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Franz 1997
    The older jazzamps had several variations. The first 10" Jazzamp ( which i owned) was 60w, and I think there was a 12" variant. Both these had no reverb, and there were some teething problems with hum and switch popping. The 12" variant was originally aimed at bassists as well as guitarists. After a year or so, the power was increased to 120W for both 10 and 12" versions.
    About that time a separate 120W head was marketed, and was also available as a "convertible" amp - ie piggy-back outfit, with head and speaker cab.
    Reverb was ( reluctantly) added by Bud H around that time. A couple of years later I think, Hendriksen briefly marketing a "bluesamp", which was a standard jazzamp 10 fitted with an Eminence Ragin Cajun speaker. The Ragin Cajun was only rated at 75 watts, but apparently survived the 120W that the power section put out. The Bluesamp wasn't very successful in the market, and didn't last long. All these "Jazzamps" were "conventional" or class AB power units, with heavier weight and heatsinks as part of the amp units.

    After the introduction of the Blu amp, as part of the Bud and Blu series that replaced the Jazzamp line, Hendriksen experimented with a Class D power unit, which is lighter and requires no heatsink. It's sometimes called a 'digital" power amp, although in fact it is also a form of analogue amp like the previous class AB power amps. The experiment was successful, and AFAIK all Bud and Blu amps have now adopted class D power, with the resultant benefits of lower weight and less heat. Hendriksen was a comparatively late entry to using Class D amps: Acoustic Image amps in the US have been pioneering Class D amps for at least a decade, as have smaller amp makers in Europe and elsewhere.

    There are two features of Hendriksen Amps that have remained constant over the years; they are the graphic equaliser form of tone control, and the use of Eminence Beta speakers ( actually a 250W PA speaker) and sometimes, separate "tweeters", apart from the one experiment with the "bluesamp". In that way, the "Hendriksen sound" has stayed fairly consistent over the years.
    Thanks. I've also been looking at the past Henriksen threads in the forum. I think I found out the model names for the each evolution phase you describe above. Does this sound about right?
    JazzAmp 12: The first generation. Low wattage (60W). No reverb nor tweeter. Fan cooled.
    JazzAmp 112 (110): The second generation. Higher power (120W) with reverb and no cooling fan
    JazzAmp 112ER: Same as above but with on board tweeter.
    JazzAmp 312ER: The third generation. Highest EQ control is centered on 7.3 Khz instead of 10 Khz of the older models to be more useable for guitar. Slight power increase (135W) and headphone out.
    These all had class A/B power amplification.

  7. #6

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    I had a second generation Convertible, i.e. a separate head with reverb and a 10" cab, from 2007 onwards. Separate so I could use the Henriksen cab as a reference to my early experiments eventually leading to the TOOB concept almost a decade later. Even by today's standards, the amp was fine with the exception of a mechanical noise which was annoying when starting from cold. Not sure if it was a fan inside or just something vibrating. Apparently, too many Polytones were still around, explaining why the 1st and 2nd generations were not a huge success. The successor, with two inputs and preamps, was too big for my purposes and quite pricey. I actually sold the Henriksen rig and used a Fender Super Champ XD from around 2012 until my cabs and DV Mark's Micro 50 fell in love on first date in early 2017. Fast-forwarding to today, all I hear about the Buds and the Blus from my customers is laudatory. Looks like the Forte is not competitive against Quilter's flurry of new combos and heads.

    Short commercial break: Covid has forced many musicians to the streets. My esteem of buskers has gone up tremendously. What the world is still missing is a small, inexpensive, battery-compatible two-channel head, a cross between Quilter SuperBlocks and the Bud head. I have a litter of 4-5 lbs Metro cabs just waiting for such an amp to happen.

  8. #7

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    The Forte was canned a couple of years ago, I think. There is currently a Bud head, presumably replacing the old class/AB head from several years ago.

    Pedantic note; my particular 60w generation 1 jazzamp 10 had no fan cooling. With only 60w watts and a heatsink, it didn't seem necessary. It was ( IMO) underpowered for anything other than small room gigs, and definitely underpowered with drums or horns.

  9. #8

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    The original Jazzamp was underpowered, and had no reverb, but it had great tone.

    I played one at the LI Guitar Show when they first came out. I had one of the first Sadowsky Semi Hollows at the time and Bud was very excited to hear it through the Jazzamp. It sounded glorious! Bud was happy. Even Jimmy Bruno, who had his Sadowsky signature model, was wondering what guitar I was playing.

    it was pretty cool!

    the first one was a 10. The 12 was meant for bass or 7 string.

    as soon as the power increased and they added reverb, I grabbed one. Been a fan ever since.

    in fact, I am waiting for a Blu to be shipped!

  10. #9

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    I was not impressed with the first generation of non reverb Henriksens. I thought they were underpowered, needed reverb, and the 12 inch model was WAY too bass heavy.

    Years later I bought a two channel Henriksen head that had reverb and sufficient power from a fellow forum member (Thanks again Jim Soloway) and sold it to another fellow forum member (Hope you are still loving it Klattu!) a year or two later. I used it with a Raezer's Edge Stealth 10ER (that I bought from another forum member, Thanks again Danny W.!) and I liked it. Then I got a Class D Blu 6 which has been my go to gigging amp since. I have added a Blu 10 that I bought from another fellow forum member (Thanks again Oomph!), so the two Henriksen Blu's are what I play my gigs with these days.

    The Class D Henriksens are, IMO a bit warmer than the earlier ones and are just great. As is buying and selling gear from and to fellow forum members!

  11. #10

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    Just to reiterate what has already been stated. A warning: I have seen used original "The Bud's" advertised as the newer Bud Six. They are different. The originals have a big heavy heat sink on the back, the new ones do not, and are lighter. I sold my original Bud to get the new Bud 6, strictly for the carry factor. Think about eliminating a 5 lb bag of potatoes.

  12. #11

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    Just an aside: I've been bringing my Bud Six to big band rehearsal. This week I brought my Quilter MP 8, and the drummer actually commented on the better sound of the Quilter, and he rarely says anything. Now there were other variables, a different bass player and different keyboard amp placement. But food for thought.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    ...... my Quilter MP 8, and the drummer actually commented on the better sound of the Quilter..........
    Interesting, but what is your preference.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Just to reiterate what has already been stated. A warning: I have seen used original "The Bud's" advertised as the newer Bud Six. They are different. The originals have a big heavy heat sink on the back, the new ones do not, and are lighter. I sold my original Bud to get the new Bud 6, strictly for the carry factor. Think about eliminating a 5 lb bag of potatoes.
    I did the same, upgrading from the original Bud 6. I have also noticed vendors selling new old stock Bud 6 amps without warning that they were not the updated version.

    Not only are the new Buds 5 pounds lighter, they also have bluetooth capability for adding an external source, which means that one can use both channels and an iPhone, say, independently. The original model had a jack for external audio, and the volume was controlled by channel 1, IIRC.

  15. #14

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    Before the Blu and Bud there were 2 version 1’s 110 and 112, then version 2, version 3, and now the Bud and Blu. The biggest improvements IMO was the EQ’s and reverb sound.
    I don’t see any difference between my 312 and Blu 10 except for the bigger sound out of the 312. The build schematic and EQ’s are the same.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by gitterbug
    [...] short commercial break: Covid has forced many musicians to the streets. My esteem of buskers has gone up tremendously. what the world is still missing is a small, inexpensive, battery-compatible two-channel head, a cross between quilter superblocks and the bud head. i have a litter of 4-5 lbs metro cabs just waiting for such an amp to happen.
    amen!

  17. #16

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    Difference in size between a Blu 6 and 10

    Different generation Henriksen amps-cb9c4fa3-1f65-4ea0-86ba-240686aa4ef9-jpegDifferent generation Henriksen amps-0a6da902-6fe4-4acb-95ce-2dcd90dfcf15-jpeg

  18. #17

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    I'd like a Bud 8.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz_175
    Interesting, but what is your preference.
    Do you want an apple or an orange? I prefer an orange. Or even better, some kind of melon.
    Last edited by Woody Sound; 06-27-2022 at 12:39 PM.

  20. #19

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    I see that the Bud/Blue 10 is much deeper than the old JazzAmp 110 that I owned for a while; I think that might yield an improvement in the depth and clarity of the low end. If I didn't own an amp, I believe I would buy a Bud 10. (Woody, I'd like a Bud 8, too!)

    Anyway, I've owned a JazzAmp 112 since 2009 (120w RMS, Reverb, heat sink) and a Bud 6 (17 pounds, heat sink) since 2019. I don't think I'll ever need anything else. Sometimes I think I should sell the JazzAmp 112 and get an extension speaker for the Bud (probably a Raezer's Edge NY8), but the 112 sounds so good that I don't think I'll change anything. To quote Chuck Berry from, Reelin' and Rockin': "Sometimes I will, then again I think I won't. Sometimes I do, then again I think I don't!"

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Do you want an apple or an orange? I prefer an orange. Or even more, some kind of melon.
    It's a tough decision - they all have a peel

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    I see that the Bud/Blue 10 is much deeper than the old JazzAmp 110 that I owned for a while; I think that might yield an improvement in the depth and clarity of the low end. If I didn't own an amp, I believe I would buy a Bud 10. (Woody, I'd like a Bud 8, too!)
    Yeah, they could use the same full range speaker (or similar) that is in the Quilter 8.

  23. #22

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    In all of this no one has mentioned the fact that the BLU series (and a few of the older models) only feature ONE volume control whereas the BUD models have an extra GAIN control - IHMO this is a MAJOR factor in dialing in specific tones and lets me hold off a purchase of a quite attractively priced BLU ....

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Looks like the Forte is not competitive against Quilter's flurry of new combos and heads.
    In your opinion is this due to cost, features, sound quality?

    AKA

  25. #24

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    Blu does seem warmer and more "electric" than previous generations, adding more colour. The older ones (post 60w version) are still great though. I had a head that sounded great and I have the older electronics in my prototype Alfresco open back 12". I loaned it to a guy this past weekend for a gig and he was over the moon at the sound, but in the bigger ones it also depends on speaker choice - I happen to have a heavier but better sounding speaker in mine.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    I was not impressed with the first generation of non reverb Henriksens. I thought they were underpowered, needed reverb, and the 12 inch model was WAY too bass heavy.

    Years later I bought a two channel Henriksen head that had reverb and sufficient power from a fellow forum member (Thanks again Jim Soloway) and sold it to another fellow forum member (Hope you are still loving it Klattu!) a year or two later. I used it with a Raezer's Edge Stealth 10ER (that I bought from another forum member, Thanks again Danny W.!) and I liked it. Then I got a Class D Blu 6 which has been my go to gigging amp since. I have added a Blu 10 that I bought from another fellow forum member (Thanks again Oomph!), so the two Henriksen Blu's are what I play my gigs with these days.

    The Class D Henriksens are, IMO a bit warmer than the earlier ones and are just great. As is buying and selling gear from and to fellow forum members!
    So does that mean that if a Henriksen Jazzamp has reverb, it also has 120 watts and no cooling fan. I wrote a reply to your Smith and Wesson post that disappeared. Definitely a conspiracy...