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  1. #1

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    I just got one in. It's a lovely example with a factory installed BJB. It's lighter than I expected with a thin top. The f holes are small so I can't fit a camera in it so see, but I believe it's parallel brace.

    I'll do a full review when it adjust to this longitude.

    Here are some shots of the top. It's tight spruce with great silking.
    Question:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-20211118_221445-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-20211118_221429-jpg

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Because sometimes Gibson does dumb things (no offense on your ngd or any other owners) they're well made, but they're not in the same league as the originals from a sound standpoint (surprise, not) Gibson picks odd models to reissue, they reissued the prewar ES-150 w CC pickup, but why not the much cooler and rarer deluxe model, the ES-250
    If it was my decision I'd have made a reissue of a circa '27-'28 dot neck model (actually '29-'30 models since the Joe Spann book corrections) I like the understated look of the earlier models and they typically sound way better than later block marker 16" L-5s w kerfed bracing (not that it applies here) I'm pretty sure the reissues are X braced, why Gibson did that I have no idea. The originals have ebony bridges as opposed to rosewood on the reissues (the guitar above has a pearl inlaid rosewood bridge ala prewar Super 400s) I wouldn't put a pickup on a 16" L-5 though that was likely added later.

    There was someone here looking for a reissue, so if you don't bond w it shouldn't be too hard to sell.

  4. #3

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    I have discussed the build history of the 1934 RI with Gibson. They are doing further research on each of the concerns. I can see it is x-braced. The pickup was installed at the factory for this particular instrument. They will explain the rosewood bridge, the bracing, and the choice of the 1934 L-5 for a RI.

    Here are some build pics of this very instrument. I will add more.

    Question:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut16724-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-100_0870-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-100_0872-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17860-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17352-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17012-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut16809-jpg

  5. #4

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    Very sweet guitar !

  6. #5

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    While I wasn't around in 1934, I certainly saw the Gibson plant from the inside a lot growing up. My friends' parents worked there every day for years. I knew the culture. Some of the workers are still alive.

    I look at these Nashville employees and see no real difference. There is a lot of hands-on in this build just like in the Kalamazoo days.

    It is fair to have opinions, to question whether it is a true to form reissue, and comment on the desirability.

    I am happy about the BJB pickup. It sounds great and I don't think its presence alters the acoustic tone.

    Bryce Roberson sold me his 1920s L-5 long ago. He noted that it was "opened up". This guy played as much as anyone I've ever met as a studio and Chicago night club professional. Opened up did not mean what he thought modern players described. The guitar needed to be played hard with heavy strings and a higher action to "synchronize" the woods.

    J. BRYCE ROBERSON, JAZZ AND BLUES ARTIST – Chicago Tribune
    Pro-Co Sound | West Mich Music Hysterical Society

    Bryce may be wrong, but it would be the first time I found that to be the case when it came to playing jazz. BTW, Bryce did modernize the L-5 I got from him by putting a McCarty pickup on it. I believe he'd accept a BJB if it were available then.

    So lets see what Gibson has to say about the 1934 RI design. Maybe they didn't get it right.

    So musicians tend to think old master builds are better than new ones, especially stringed instruments. The idea includes that woods were better in the day, glues were better, luthiers were better, and time helps the instruments. This gets into the realm of psychoacoustics. When put to the test, this notion has been shot down, at least in some cases. Here's my favorite. It's worth reading.

    Double-Blind Violin Test: Can You Pick The Strad? : Deceptive Cadence : NPR
















    Question:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-100_0875-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17352-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17351-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17347-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17105-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17102-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-aut17010-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-100_0874-jpg

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    I just got one in. It's a lovely example with a factory installed BJB. It's lighter than I expected with a thin top. The f holes are small so I can't fit a camera in it so see, but I believe it's parallel brace.

    I'll do a full review when it adjust to this longitude.

    Here are some shots of the top. It's tight spruce with great silking.
    Question:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-20211118_221445-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-20211118_221429-jpg
    A fine archtop starts with the finest woods. That top looks to be expertly and happily sawn. If the rest of the materials and craftsmanship adhere to this standard, it's going to be a standout instrument. It has certainly scored a knowledgeable and appreciative owner, who will take proper care of it. Looking forward to your NGD, MG!

  8. #7

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    Well, this is a nice guitar but it must go back. I started all this controversary for naught.

    There is a 2" crack under the pickguard certainly due to the large volume knob sticking into the lining of the case, leaving a couple of millimeters clearance between the pot and the top. One slam of the lid or any other moderate trauma could crack it.

    The odd thing is that the crack is old and has been cleated. The owner was not aware. To be fair to him, you'd have to pull the pickguard off to see it unless you really were trying to find it. I spotted the cleat because I wanted to see what type of bracing it had.

    The crack is stable but I hate to make a deal and then have to start over when something turns out wrong. I just won't do that because of the potential for complications.

    Here is the crack. The cleat was difficult to photograph with a cheap camera, a wand light and a mirror. I circled the cleat to make it easier to find.



    Question:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-51692083779_069131bd13_c-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-51692292290_6e78a0c090_c-jpgQuestion:  Why did Gibson choose the 1934 L-5 for a reissue-51691675383_6b9aa09fe2_c-jpg

  9. #8

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    Sorry to see Marty

    You haven't had much luck of recent, what with the Heritage from Singapore? If I remember correctly.

    I had a bad deal turn up with a Seventy Seven last week. I sent it back due to the poor condition.

    Sometimes a loosing streak is just that. You either buy your way out of it, or step out for a while until it blows over.

  10. #9

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    That is what is known as a 'bummer'!

    At least you discovered the issue right away, leaving no doubts as to its likely origin and cause.

    I hope the return and refund are uneventful and quick.

  11. #10

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    We worked it out. The guitar is getting returned.

    The Singapore transaction worked out also. There is a single, simple binding strip to repair or replace. Pete Moreno will do that at the seller's expense. It's a stunning guitar.

  12. #11

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    I don't really like shipping. Since COVID the FedEx and UPS claims seem to have gone up disproportionately to the number of packages. Someone I know who works at UPS explained that there are now more deliveries and fewer workers. Many of the workers are temporary and don't plan on a career there.

    I dropped the H-575 off at Pete Moreno's this morning for the binding replacement. He's doing a total binding replacement on an old Martin. The Heritage will be significantly easier. It's a single strip of white binding. He can knock that out in a few hours but cannot be disturbed at all once he starts the process.

  13. #12

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    i’m far more comfortable doing business with people that are willing to pick up the instrument and try it first.

    Pete Marino really did an outstanding job on that Gretsch double anniversary that belonged to Bob Lafond that I got.
    he did a whole bunch of binding replacement on it and you could never tell


    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    I don't really like shipping. Since COVID the FedEx and UPS claims seem to have gone up disproportionately to the number of packages. Someone I know who works at UPS explained that there are now more deliveries and fewer workers. Many of the workers are temporary and don't plan on a career there.

    I dropped the H-575 off at Pete Moreno's this morning for the binding replacement. He's doing a total binding replacement on an old Martin. The Heritage will be significantly easier. It's a single strip of white binding. He can knock that out in a few hours but cannot be disturbed at all once he starts the process.

  14. #13

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    That is too bad Marty.....

    I had one and sold it too soon and miss it to this day......

    Aside from that particular one with that crack, they do have a Gibson L-5 sound, but I just seemed to have to dig at it to get any volume, just like modern Gibson L-5 acoustics..

    But they have a look and a feel, and man oh man I'd have a hard time walking away from one again, I know that.

    Anyway hope another crosses your way Marty. !

  15. #14

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    Yeah I always wondered why they didn’t do a 20s dot neck instead. (With a trimmed down neck.)

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Yeah I always wondered why they didn’t do a 20s dot neck instead. (With a trimmed down neck.)
    I'll see what Gibson reports on this topic and post it.

  17. #16

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    Yeah I always wondered why they didn’t do a 20s dot neck instead. (With a trimmed down neck.)

  18. #17

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    I’m Sorry Marty…. You’re right probably shipping… but still thats a happy balloon popper for sure. But they really should think it through and do something more in shipping to protect a nice instrument like that.
    Birds gotta fly,
    Gibsons gotta be Gibson.
    love ‘em, hate ‘em at least they keep us amused.

  19. #18

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    Enjoy


  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crm114
    Enjoy

    Yeah this has been posted many times, still cracks me up. Notice how they substitute a cheap guitar at the end to be tossed.

  21. #20

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    yesh that was probably me posting it
    im a huge fan of them and this scene clipped from the crest which features all of the boys





    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Yeah this has been posted many times, still cracks me up. Notice how they substitute a cheap guitar at the end to be tossed.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Yeah I always wondered why they didn’t do a 20s dot neck instead. (With a trimmed down neck.)
    Birch back and sides, anyone? I haven’t seen a birch backed modern archtop. Does anyone make one?

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    While I wasn't around in 1934, I certainly saw the Gibson plant from the inside a lot growing up. My friends' parents worked there every day for years. I knew the culture. Some of the workers are still alive.

    I look at these Nashville employees and see no real difference. There is a lot of hands-on in this build just like in the Kalamazoo days.

    It is fair to have opinions, to question whether it is a true to form reissue, and comment on the desirability.

    I am happy about the BJB pickup. It sounds great and I don't think its presence alters the acoustic tone.

    Bryce Roberson sold me his 1920s L-5 long ago. He noted that it was "opened up". This guy played as much as anyone I've ever met as a studio and Chicago night club professional. Opened up did not mean what he thought modern players described. The guitar needed to be played hard with heavy strings and a higher action to "synchronize" the woods.

    J. BRYCE ROBERSON, JAZZ AND BLUES ARTIST – Chicago Tribune
    Pro-Co Sound | West Mich Music Hysterical Society

    Bryce may be wrong, but it would be the first time I found that to be the case when it came to playing jazz. BTW, Bryce did modernize the L-5 I got from him by putting a McCarty pickup on it. I believe he'd accept a BJB if it were available then.

    So lets see what Gibson has to say about the 1934 RI design. Maybe they didn't get it right.

    So musicians tend to think old master builds are better than new ones, especially stringed instruments. The idea includes that woods were better in the day, glues were better, luthiers were better, and time helps the instruments. This gets into the realm of psychoacoustics. When put to the test, this notion has been shot down, at least in some cases. Here's my favorite. It's worth reading.

    Double-Blind Violin Test: Can You Pick The Strad? : Deceptive Cadence : NPR
    I just noticed this post from a month or so ago. I was very interested to read your comments about Bryce Roberson and to hear that you bought his L5. He was such an amazing musician who was not as well known as he should have been. My family visited Kalamazoo many times in the 1970’s and we hung out at the Sound Factory with Bryce, Charlie and the gang. We played a bunch of guitars with Bryce upstairs in Uncle Dirty’s recording studio and I was blown away by his playing. I don’t remember Bryce’s old L5, but there were so many guitars around there, I may have just forgotten about it. At that time, he was playing a custom built black ES (I can’t remember if it was a 335, 345 or 355) with a two-octave neck. Bryce actually made a trip up here to Canada with that guitar and stayed at my house for a few days. He came out to the club and sat in with my brother’s band one night. Your post brings all those wonderful memories back. Do you still have the L5?
    Keith