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  1. #1

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    Man...I have tried some and then more.

    Always wondered what the big deal was. Now I found a good one. plays and sounds amazing.

    1977 ES175T

    I was never fan of big jazz boxes but this does the trick.

    My first good Gibson!-img_0560-jpg

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    That is highly desirable instrument. Congratulations, and play it in good health!

  4. #3

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    For your first Gibson, you did good...real good!! ES-175T's are rare.

  5. #4
    Looks beautiful! Congrats!

  6. #5

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    Congratulations. Let the fun begin!!

  7. #6

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    Once you go Gibson (and score a good one), there is no going back. May she inspire your playing for many years to come!

  8. #7

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    A Gibson 175 a true jazz icon guitar it was the tool of Joe Pass, Jim Hall, Herb Ellis, and Steve Howe. Not bad endorsement of just what it is! Play the frets off it. Nice Guitar.

  9. #8

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    Indeed a really nice guitar, had one just like it years ago. Plugged into the Jack and the Jack collapsed breaking the wood, so be gentle)))
    It was back when I had to sell just about everything. It went to the nicest guy in Spain, he owned a popsicle factory.
    Enjoy it, I miss mine!
    jk

  10. #9

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    Those were only made for a couple of years in the 70's? Looks like a good score for sure. I don't think I've ever seen one IRL.

  11. #10

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    You got the best color too

  12. #11

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    Agree!
    I walked into the Cherry Hill NJ GC, it screamed at me ‘take me home ‘.))). So I did, as I recall $1,200 in about 1994?
    Seriously nice guitar. And Norlin no less, with a cute volute IIRC.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter
    Agree!
    I walked into the Cherry Hill NJ GC, it screamed at me ‘take me home ‘.))). So I did, as I recall $1,200 in about 1994?
    Seriously nice guitar. And Norlin no less, with a cute volute IIRC.
    You wouldn't find anything that nice in there these days, unfortunately.

  14. #13
    Tomorrow that bad boy is going to get some serious bebop treatment.

    I compared it to an Eastman which was a nice guitar but it did sound like a tuna can compared to that.

    Then again I have eat some canned tuna to save back the cash.

  15. #14

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    Congratulations! It’s a wonderful guitar and a wonderful experience. I’ll never forget the feeling when I got my first Gibson (and any Gibson is a thrill, although some are more so than others). I remember the day well because I got my LG1 on my 12th birthday. More than 60 years and 6 Gibsons later, that first Gibson high has not worn off and never will. Gibson got me excited about guitars, and I’ll always be grateful.


  16. #15

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    Kind of a weird thread title. The first "good" Gibson?

  17. #16
    I have had some Gibsons but more recent ones. (ES335)

    Never got attached to them and got rid. Preferred always my Ibanez 2457.

    Odd.

  18. #17

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    Looks great! Enjoy in good health.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by kekkuli
    I have had some Gibsons but more recent ones. (ES335)

    Never got attached to them and got rid. Preferred always my Ibanez 2457.

    Odd.
    Sadly not odd at all. Poor Orville’s dead, and his legacy has been taken over multiple times by those who favored net revenue over the maintenance of excellence at any cost. The combined pursuit of endless business growth and higher profit margins, driven by corporate ownership, resulted in the Gibson we know today. They (along with Guild and other top American makers) were also chased off the throne by global competition spurred on by Americans like Harry Rosenbloom who stimulated the entry of Japanese copies of Gibsons and other top US makers into our market. Look up the history of Ibanez and Hoshino, who did the deed right here in Pennsylvania, for details.

    There have always been great Gibsons. But until the mid ‘60s, it was pretty much all of their output. Since then, a higher and higher percentage of their output has been less than great in one way or another. There are too many variants of the same basic guitars for them to deliver consistent excellence, in my opinion. But a fair number are still very nice and some are close to great. Sadly, you have to do your homework to find models well suited to your desires and play every one you consider before buying it. The hunt is worth the effort, if you want one.

  20. #19
    Also.

    It is completely mint. Need to be careful.

    My first good Gibson!-34694a76-1de9-4c62-9a7a-df0af03a1ca2-jpg

  21. #20

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    A fully hollow thin body is a wonderful thing.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by nevershouldhavesoldit
    Congratulations! It’s a wonderful guitar and a wonderful experience. I’ll never forget the feeling when I got my first Gibson (and any Gibson is a thrill, although some are more so than others). I remember the day well because I got my LG1 on my 12th birthday. More than 60 years and 6 Gibsons later, that first Gibson high has not worn off and never will. Gibson got me excited about guitars, and I’ll always be grateful.

    I remember being about 5 or so and looking at an early 60's Gibson catalogue and just falling in love with the L5CT, the George Gobel model. Every time I see a red L5 it just all comes rushing back An absolute work of art in every way; such a beautiful, functional piece of perfection.

  23. #22

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    That’s a really good looking guitar for 45 years old.

    It must have been played yet meticulously cared for, proper humidity, etc.

    Do you know the story on it?

  24. #23
    Very nice! Congrats, HNGD. and play her in good health!

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    That’s a really good looking guitar for 45 years old.

    It must have been played yet meticulously cared for, proper humidity, etc.

    Do you know the story on it?
    Some american dude left it to local guitar store for sale when he moved back to US. Because of Covid and all the lockdown stuff.

  26. #25

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    IIWY I'd take some brown stain to that bridge base to better batch the fb. Or even more extreme, some dark cherry stain to match the body.