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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Greentone
    Thanks ! Both are special for sure. My wife is a real gem when it comes to me buying guitars. The key is to reciprocate - so I buy her all the fabric, framing materials, sewing/quilting machines etc. - to support her hobby equally.


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    "Happy Wife, Happy Life!" Timeless and priceless advice.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    I only have one, and I really love it.
    2014 Trenier 18" Classic-trenier-jpg
    This thread makes me get it out of it's case and play it!

    It's a great guitar, as you would expect!

  4. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by skykomishone
    I only have one, and I really love it.
    2014 Trenier 18" Classic-trenier-jpg
    This thread makes me get it out of it's case and play it!

    It's a great guitar, as you would expect!
    What a beauty Sky- I love it !


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  5. #54
    Just realized an incredible coincidence - and perhaps the reason why this 18” is very “D’Aquisto like”. It’s the same serial number as my 77’ D’Aquisto. You can’t make this stuff up!





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  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Just realized an incredible coincidence - and perhaps the reason why this 18” is very “D’Aquisto like”. It’s the same serial number as my 77’ D’Aquisto. You can’t make this stuff up!





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    Meant to be!!

  7. #56

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    QAman, I don’t want to distract anyone away from your impressive new guitar, but I am intrigued by your earlier post (#44) about your thoughts (pick shaping) and Jimmy D’Aquisto‘s thoughts (thickness, how to hold, attack angle) on plectrums. Could I trouble you to expound upon this? I’d like to learn.

  8. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by GregMath
    QAman, I don’t want to distract anyone away from your impressive new guitar, but I am intrigued by your earlier post (#44) about your thoughts (pick shaping) and Jimmy D’Aquisto‘s thoughts (thickness, how to hold, attack angle) on plectrums. Could I trouble you to expound upon this? I’d like to learn.
    GregMath,
    I’ve attached some excerpt photos from my video of Jimmy building my 1991 Excel. These pics are from the day I picked up my guitar. He was explaining to me how important it was to hold the pic perpendicular (attack angle) to the strings to get that fat warm sound. He also said to use the round side of a heavy pic to drive the top through its break in period. The difference in tone was profound during his explanation.

    Over time I began to realize what he was saying , and thus my explanation about shaping pic radius, and using a thicker plectrum.

    I have incorporated his lesson into my playing for the past 30 years - and know just how to get that warm fat tone he was talking about .

    Hope this provides more insight to your question.




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  9. #58

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    Thank you, QAman! I appreciate you taking the time to share this.

  10. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by GregMath
    Thank you, QAman! I appreciate you taking the time to share this.
    My pleasure. It was a special time in my life. When I visited Bryant Trenier for the first time - it was like reliving my visits to Jimmy's shop.

    Bryant is the only builder I know who builds like Jimmy....and the results are remarkably similar.

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  11. #60

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    Steve, do you understand Bryant's numbering system?

    Your new guitar is No. 1107 made in June 2014. The box in my 17" Artifex archtop by Bryant was closed in Jan 2019 (when he would have signed it) and it is No. 1144. I assume the first four numbers are the number of guitars that he has made. I have no idea what the last digit stands for do you (e.g., a 7 for a guitar made in 2014 and a 4 for an instrument made in 2019)? Given that there was about 4-1/2 years between these two, that is about 8 instruments a year. I believe Bryant began selling instruments under his own label in 1998, so 144 instruments across two decades makes sense.

    Jimmy's numbering by 1977 would be consistent with about 9 guitars a year 1965 to 1977. I suspect in his system, it was the guitar number and the last digit of the year it was made (7 from 1977). I suspect to reach the 370 guitars made under his own label, he must have increased in the 1980s and 1990s to 12 to 15 a year as he became more popular.

    Different builders use different systems. Some builders use different numbering per model. Some use a combination of the sequence of instrument combined with a calendar date (e.g., guitar serial no. is 2660117 meaning guitar #266, made in Jan 2017).

  12. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7
    Steve, do you understand Bryant's numbering system?

    Your new guitar is No. 1107 made in June 2014. The box in my 17" Artifex archtop by Bryant was closed in Jan 2019 (when he would have signed it) and it is No. 1144. I assume the first four numbers are the number of guitars that he has made. I have no idea what the last digit stands for do you (e.g., a 7 for a guitar made in 2014 and a 4 for an instrument made in 2019)? Given that there was about 4-1/2 years between these two, that is about 8 instruments a year. I believe Bryant began selling instruments under his own label in 1998, so 144 instruments across two decades makes sense.

    Jimmy's numbering by 1977 would be consistent with about 9 guitars a year 1965 to 1977. I suspect in his system, it was the guitar number and the last digit of the year it was made (7 from 1977). I suspect to reach the 370 guitars made under his own label, he must have increased in the 1980s and 1990s to 12 to 15 a year as he became more popular.

    Different builders use different systems. Some builders use different numbering per model. Some use a combination of the sequence of instrument combined with a calendar date (e.g., guitar serial no. is 2660117 meaning guitar #266, made in Jan 2017).
    Bob,
    Bryant’s serial number system consists of the last 3 digits. So, 1107 is the 107th guitar made. My Georgian ( SN 1150), was made to commemorate Bryant’s 150th build.

    I believe the D’Aquisto numbering system is the same as well. I can research later when I’m home.


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  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    GregMath,
    I’ve attached some excerpt photos from my video of Jimmy building my 1991 Excel. These pics are from the day I picked up my guitar. He was explaining to me how important it was to hold the pic perpendicular (attack angle) to the strings to get that fat warm sound. He also said to use the round side of a heavy pic to drive the top through its break in period. The difference in tone was profound during his explanation.

    Over time I began to realize what he was saying , and thus my explanation about shaping pic radius, and using a thicker plectrum.

    I have incorporated his lesson into my playing for the past 30 years - and know just how to get that warm fat tone he was talking about .

    Hope this provides more insight to your question.]


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    I’m not a guitar builder or a great player, but I’ve been doing the “perpendicular” pick for about 10 years…or since I got serious about the guitar. I just could never get a pleasing tone with any other angle. I’ve also been using the same small, rounded tip, thick pick since about that time (Blue Chip KS60 unbeveled). Boggles my mind how some players are able to get a nice tone with pointy picks at diagonal angles to the strings!

    On serial numbers, my 2016 Motif is #1126. The 2021 Jazz Special I had (now sold) was, I think, 114x.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Bob,
    Bryant’s serial number system consists of the last 3 digits. So, 1107 is the 107th guitar made. My Georgian ( SN 1150), was made to commemorate Bryant’s 150th build.

    I believe the D’Aquisto numbering system is the same as well. I can research later when I’m home.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, Bryant's numbering system is the same as Jimmy's.

    Jimmy's most prolific years were the late 70s. Later in his life, Jimmy made less guitars, sadly probably due to health challenges.

  15. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Yes, Bryant's numbering system is the same as Jimmy's.

    Jimmy's most prolific years were the late 70s. Later in his life, Jimmy made less guitars, sadly probably due to health challenges.
    Yes-Jimmy’s productivity dropped during the later years because of repetitive seizures - which I witnessed during the building of my Excel in 90’-91’. It would take him weeks to overcome a seizure - and he was too weak and unstable to go into the shop during those periods.

    In my opinion, all the modern minimalistic designs were born out of his ( knowingly) reduced physical capacity - along with his burning desire to break out of the D’Angelico mould - and liberate his design ideas.

    Jimmy found a way to bring something good from something bad- and in doing so paved the way for the modern evolution of the Archtop guitar.

    I’m grateful we have Bryant Trenier to continue along that path. For those who followed my Georgian build - you will see the masterpiece Bryant built for me.

    The Trenier Georgian is the finest sounding Trenier I’ve ever played - and one of the best guitars I’ve ever laid my hands on.......by any builder. It’s that extraordinary - and I’m fortunate to own it.


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    Last edited by QAman; 10-11-2021 at 07:34 PM.

  16. #65

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    Hey Steve,

    Nice! What is the nut width? Can you post pics of the back and rims?

    AKA

  17. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by AKA
    Hey Steve,

    Nice! What is the nut width? Can you post pics of the back and rims?

    AKA
    Hi Albert ,
    Nice to hear from you and hope all is well. Nut width is 1.740. Here are
    few pics for you.



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  18. #67

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    Wow….that is all.

  19. #68

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    Thanks Steve. I listened to the instrument through my headphones. What a wonderful acoustic tone!

    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Hi Albert ,
    Nice to hear from you and hope all is well. Nut width is 1.740. Here are
    few pics for you.



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  20. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by AKA
    Thanks Steve. I listened to the instrument through my headphones. What a wonderful acoustic tone!
    Albert,
    Thanks for listening. The guitar has a warm timbre with tons of sustain- a very soft vibe when played gently. When pushed hard it’s explosive. A real great guitar which offers me something different from my other instruments. It’s my only 18”- and I’m finding it to be very comfortable.

    If I could change one thing on this guitar - It would be adding a side port. I would never order a guitar again WITHOUT a side port. It makes such a huge difference for the player. My Georgian is off the charts crazy good because of having that side port.
    You get to hear so much more of the guitar.

    In fact, Gibson has now introduced an acoustic flat top series of instruments with side ports - it’s catching on.


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  21. #70

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    2014 Trenier 18" Classic-25ab4252-cada-4502-85fd-dae1036c8fe0-jpg

    Steve,

    l’m with you regarding the use of side ports! This is my 2008 17” Mirabella Noncut. I love the entire experience - including the puff’s of air against my face from the ports.

    (Sure wish I knew how to rotate the photo.)

    AKA


    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Albert,
    Thanks for listening. The guitar has a warm timbre with tons of sustain- a very soft vibe when played gently. When pushed hard it’s explosive. A real great guitar which offers me something different from my other instruments. It’s my only 18”- and I’m finding it to be very comfortable.

    If I could change one thing on this guitar - It would be adding a side port. I would never order a guitar again WITHOUT a side port. It makes such a huge difference for the player. My Georgian is off the charts crazy good because of having that side port.
    You get to hear so much more of the guitar.

    In fact, Gibson has now introduced an acoustic flat top series of instruments with side ports - it’s catching on.


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  22. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by AKA
    2014 Trenier 18" Classic-25ab4252-cada-4502-85fd-dae1036c8fe0-jpg

    Steve,

    l’m with you regarding the use of side ports! This is my 2008 17” Mirabella Noncut. I love the entire experience - including the puff’s of air against my face from the ports.

    (Sure wish I knew how to rotate the photo.)

    AKA
    AKA,
    That non cut Mirabella is a real beauty ! The side port is a game changer and being adopted by more builders.

    I’m really enjoying the 18” classic - the tone is very warm and smooth sounding, and actually enhances the continuity of my
    playing.


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  23. #72

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    I have a sound port on one of my archtops, my gypsy, a number of my flattops and on both of my nylon string guitars. I have found the enveloping sonic monitor characteristic very satisfying for a solo, home player. Many builders actually reduce the main sound hole size to compensate for the additional surface area provided by a sound port to maintain the target body resonance (e.g., an OM sized flattop traditionally has a 3-7/8” diameter sound hole on a few with sound ports the sound hole was reduced to 3-3/4” diameter.).

  24. #73

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    I love the aesthetics of Benedetto’s “Blue Guitar” contribution. On that instrument a floral motif replaces the traditional f-hole on one side of the top and is repeated as an upper bout sound port. I wonder if the pattern effects the sound quality.

    I can imagine an exceptionally voiced 18” with a sound port could be a wonderful playing experience. I once asked asked Bryant if it would be feasible to retrofit one of his existing builds to add a sound port. He explained why he didn’t think that would be a good idea?

    AKA

    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7
    I have a sound port on one of my archtops, my gypsy, a number of my flattops and on both of my nylon string guitars. I have found the enveloping sonic monitor characteristic very satisfying for a solo, home player. Many builders actually reduce the main sound hole size to compensate for the additional surface area provided by a sound port to maintain the target body resonance (e.g., an OM sized flattop traditionally has a 3-7/8” diameter sound hole on a few with sound ports the sound hole was reduced to 3-3/4” diameter.).

  25. #74

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    Forgetting acoustics, there are typically structural aspects to a sound port. A luthier will typically laminate a cross grain piece of a stable wood to minimize the risk of crack propitiation. This cannot be done once the “box” is closed. Additionally adding a port on a finished instrument is asking for trouble.



    Quote Originally Posted by AKA
    I love the aesthetics of Benedetto’s “Blue Guitar” contribution. On that instrument a floral motif replaces the traditional f-hole on one side of the top and is repeated as an upper bout sound port. I wonder if the pattern effects the sound quality.

    I can imagine an exceptionally voiced 18” with a sound port could be a wonderful playing experience. I once asked asked Bryant if it would be feasible to retrofit one of his existing builds to add a sound port. He explained why he didn’t think that would be a good idea?

    AKA

  26. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7
    Forgetting acoustics, there are typically structural aspects to a sound port. A luthier will typically laminate a cross grain piece of a stable wood to minimize the risk of crack propitiation. This cannot be done once the “box” is closed. Additionally adding a port on a finished instrument is asking for trouble.

    Every side port Archtop I’ve played , and even my Georgian - does indeed have an interior structural feature as you mentioned. This feature is shaped to precisely match the curvature of the inside, then glued in place.

    Trying to add this interior feature to a finished guitar would certainly be challenging ( maybe impossible ) - and likely not worth taking the risk of damaging the guitar.


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    Last edited by QAman; 10-17-2021 at 11:22 PM.