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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spook410
    Elegance good. Bling bad. Function over fluff.
    How about this for bling level? You should dress to the bling level of your guitar. Seems fair.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim777
    Isn't that the Adam West model?
    I think the Unknown Hinson may have fought Batman in an episode.


  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Right you are. I remember a talk Jimmy gave back in the early 80's……..Back when Jimmy D was rewriting the rules, Bob Benedetto was still finding his sea legs.
    There is no question that Jimmy D’Aquisto earned his reputation, and his guitars are the gold standard for sure. Having said that, I think the “sea legs” comment is a little disrespectful to Bob Benedetto. Bob was also a prolific and innovative luthier during the era when archtop designs were undergoing many of the changes we are talking about. Bob built over 50 guitars by 1980, passed the 100 mark in early 1983 and had completed over 300 before he published his book in 1994. His very first guitar (1968) had a solid ebony tailpiece with no brass or screws, a design which he continued to use throughout his career. The guitar he made for Chuck Wayne in 1982 was the first one he made without binding or inlays. No disrespect to Jimmy, but I think Bob also deserves credit for his contributions to the modern archtop guitar. Not to mention, sharing his secrets with the whole world via is book, which has helped many of today’s luthiers.
    Keith

  5. #54

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    old traditional guitars need block inlays to look "old" and "traditional", but I much prefer the sleek clean look of no inlay, or some very minimal inlay (such as a single 12th fret marker, for example).

    When i play standing, i actually cannot see the fingerboard, so the absence of inlays makes no difference whatsoever.
    Now those side markers better be there, and not blend in with the binding, or i'm gonna have trouble at a darkly lit gig.

    fwiw.

  6. #55

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    What do you think? - Can’t we have both? - Why not?

    Dimitri.

    Sir?

    Lobster and cracked crab for everyone.

    Extra prima good, Mr. Coleman, Sir.

    Looking good, Billy Ray.

    Feeling good, Louis.


  7. #56

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    This certainly looks like Jimmy Bruno, the guitar looks like a Benedetto, and it appears to have large fretboard markers.

    ISTR seeing one of Jimmy's videos in which he mentions insisting on markers, but I'm too lazy to go through all of them right now.

  8. #57

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    I am friends with Jimmy. Because he does a bunch of in person and online instruction, he likes to have fretboard position indicators on his guitars. It makes it easier when teaching.

    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    This certainly looks like Jimmy Bruno, the guitar looks like a Benedetto, and it appears to have large fretboard markers.

    ISTR seeing one of Jimmy's videos in which he mentions insisting on markers, but I'm too lazy to go through all of them right now.

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    This certainly looks like Jimmy Bruno, the guitar looks like a Benedetto, and it appears to have large fretboard markers.

    ISTR seeing one of Jimmy's videos in which he mentions insisting on markers, but I'm too lazy to go through all of them right now.
    I apologize and stand corrected. I didn’t know that Jimmy played a recent Savannah Benedetto. I was only familiar with the older ones he played back in the Classic American Guitar Show days. I’m going to remove my post, as it is in error. I do recall him saying he wanted fret markers when the Sadowsky model came out. He obviously continued to make that a requirement from that point on. Thanks for pointing this out. BTW, I’m a big fan of inlays myself.
    Keith

  10. #59

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    Actually….

    Jimmy no longer plays that Benedetto. Jimmy plays a Bill Comins archtop.

    Quote Originally Posted by floatingpickup
    I apologize and stand corrected. I didn’t know that Jimmy played a recent Savannah Benedetto. I was only familiar with the older ones he played back in the Classic American Guitar Show days. I’m going to remove my post, as it is in error. I do recall him saying he wanted fret markers when the Sadowsky model came out. He obviously continued to make that a requirement from that point on. Thanks for pointing this out. BTW, I’m a big fan of inlays myself.
    Keith

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7
    Actually….

    Jimmy no longer plays that Benedetto. Jimmy plays a Bill Comins archtop.
    Jimmy has played so many different guitars, it’s hard to keep up!

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    This certainly looks like Jimmy Bruno, the guitar looks like a Benedetto, and it appears to have large fretboard markers.

    ISTR seeing one of Jimmy's videos in which he mentions insisting on markers, but I'm too lazy to go through all of them right now.
    And I thought it was Rip Van Winkle


  13. #62

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    Jimmy Bruno could play an old Harmony guitar and still sound better than any of us could on a D'Aquisto or Benedetto. Just sayin'

  14. #63

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    Philipe Catherine definitely needs his side dots:


  15. #64

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    I just got up off my big fat arse, and took a look at the fingerboards on my two Borys guitars.
    Just like his Master, Jimmy D'AQ- no fingerboard markers!

  16. #65

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    Been playing classical recently and realise that I basically navigate the fretboard via a small dent around the fifth fret.

    give me a brand new guitar and I would suck even worse haha

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    Philipe Catherine definitely needs his side dots:

    Tricks of the trade. It reminds me of Carol Kaye saying ‘bring a pencil to the session and don’t be too proud to mark in the beats above tricky rhythms.’

    Theres lots of things that seem like cheating, but when you are doing it for a living anything that works is legitimate.

  18. #67

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    No markers on my Eastman 503ce, but it does have side dots. It doesn't bother me. I like the clean look.

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spook410
    Elegance good. Bling bad. Function over fluff.

    Good for bass player, maybe. However, the bass player should have markers for me to see. Not the other way round.
    I agree function comes first, but for me that means markers. I always play sitting down so I can always see the fingerboard. I daresay I could get used the using the side dots if I had to, but it would only happen if a guitar I loved had side dots as the only guide. And if it did, I probably wouldn't love it...

    Sent from my COL-L29 using Tapatalk

  20. #69

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    Jimmy Bruno is no longer even mentioned on the Benedetto website, at least in the players section. I haven't done a thorough search for photos, but he seems to no longer be a Benedetto player at all, even though they did some extensive repair work on his guitar, apparently for free. He's been playing the Comins for a couple of years at least.

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Gretsch does it in a smart way on many models.
    Yes - I love those partial discs that bite the edge of the fret board just a bit.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Jimmy Bruno is no longer even mentioned on the Benedetto website, at least in the players section. I haven't done a thorough search for photos, but he seems to no longer be a Benedetto player at all, even though they did some extensive repair work on his guitar, apparently for free. He's been playing the Comins for a couple of years at least.
    Interesting. Jimmy Bruno was a prominent Benedetto endorser back in time. He appears to have played a number of different Benedetto guitars over the years. In 1994, I decided I wanted a Benedetto and I spoke to Bob about ordering one. He had a fairly long lead-time and I was really anxious to get one sooner rather than later. At one point, Bob told me he had just completed a sunburst Manhattan that wasn’t spoken for. I hesitated because I wasn’t sure I wanted a guitar without fingerboard inlays. After thinking about it for couple of days, I decided to go for it anyway. I called Bob back and he told me he had just shipped it to Jimmy Bruno. I was disappointed that I “snoozed” and missed it, but I was able to buy a slightly used Fratello From Mandolin Bros a few weeks later. I still have my Fratello and it is a great guitar (with inlays!). I attached a picture of Jimmy playing a Manhattan (photo courtesy of Mike Oria Photography) but the script logo suggests that one is probably earlier than the 1994 model that he had for a while.
    Keith
    Why no fingerboard markers?-9e6ca594-b11e-43dc-8451-c67eb66d4a61-jpeg
    Photo by Mike Oria Photography
    Last edited by floatingpickup; 09-23-2021 at 07:31 PM.

  23. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    Tricks of the trade. It reminds me of Carol Kaye saying ‘bring a pencil to the session and don’t be too proud to mark in the beats above tricky rhythms.’

    Theres lots of things that seem like cheating, but when you are doing it for a living anything that works is legitimate.
    The top East Coast studio jazz player Barry galbraith used to literally cover his parts with pencil markings.
    I'm not proud, in all of the 40 or so musicals I've done in the past eight years, I've covered the books with pencil markings.
    Makes it a PITA to erase it all on the last night, but I get called back.