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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by dconeill
    "CDs or digital"? What do you think CDs are, exactly? They're digital. But I guess I understand what you're getting at.

    Splitting hairs eh? :-) The rest of us understood what he meant.

    CDs or Digital?-splitting_hairs-jpg

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  3. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    So you can get one in your boat, but not in your car. Go figure.
    Get one of these. They seem to be the kind of place to put in a CD player if you paid them to install it.

  4. #28

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    I sold my CD's years ago. The convenience of streaming is hard to beat.

  5. #29

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    LP's for the house and CD's for the car and then there are cassettes for my trucks. What is digital???
    Thanks John

  6. #30

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    I miss the loss of visual and verbal input from the change from LPs to CDs. The artwork was big enough to be impactful, and the liner notes informative; double albums (or at least foldable LP covers) provided even more scope for extra-musical content, which only enhanced the musical experience.

    Record shops, too, were great experiences especially when owned/managed by people hip enough to realize that the longer the customer loitered amongst the racks, the more likely they were to buy more records. Having an over-eager salesman breathing down your neck does nothing to move product.

    The streaming experience does nothing for me. I was browsing in a pre-owned CD shop (also lots of vinyl) when I spotted a Pharaoh Sanders title I used to have on vinyl. "You guys have Karma?" I blurted out. The clerk deadpanned, "Everybody has Karma, Man..." You don't get that sort of thing from streaming.

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  7. #31

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    [QUOTE=citizenk74;1135947 double albums (or at least foldable LP covers) provided even more scope for extra-musical content, which only enhanced the musical experience.

    [/QUOTE]

    Double albums were also very useful for cleaning the seeds and stems from a four finger lid of pot

    (did I just date myself? Today's youth may only know seedless pot)

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    The streaming experience does nothing for me. I was browsing in a pre-owned CD shop (also lots of vinyl) when I spotted a Pharaoh Sanders title I used to have on vinyl. "You guys have Karma?" I blurted out. The clerk deadpanned, "Everybody has Karma, Man..." You don't get that sort of thing from streaming.
    I just searched in Apple music for Pharoh Sanders and found a number of albums by this guy. Karma being one of them.
    So if you are in it for the music, streaming is the way to go.
    If you're in it for some vague other reason, one might consider CD's or even LP's.

  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    I just searched in Apple music for Pharoh Sanders and found a number of albums by this guy. Karma being one of them.
    So if you are in it for the music, streaming is the way to go.
    If you're in it for some vague other reason, one might consider CD's or even LP's.
    The joys of comprehensive liner notes and great cover art are largely unknown in the digital age, and they’re a critical part of the joy of recorded music. CD box inserts never came close to the level of even the most mundane Columbia LP.

    The great news is that there are now apps that collate and present the same info and a lot more while streaming or playing your own digital files. For example, Roon presents album art, credits, extra photos, and extensive background info that’s every bit as enjoyable and educational as album jackets and sleeves used to be - and there’s often a lot more. I don’t know of free streaming services that do this because I don’t use any - I pay for Roon and JRiver Media Center. But until recently, streaming was devoid of the visual and educational parts of the experience. And that’s why many of us didn’t like it except for background music.

  10. #34

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    I'm transitioning my original music from CD to on-line via Bandcamp. Both, of course, digital.

    CDs or Digital?-easydisk-proof-jpg

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  11. #35

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    I’ve got a Fluence turntable with a cheap preamp going to some mediocre Polk bookshelves that works great when the wife and I are cooking dinner and wanna throw on some vinyl for pure mood. It’s ritualistic and “feels” better than sending tracks via BT across the room from my phone. In the car, it’s Spotify from the iPhone all the way. When I’m in the studio, I reference CDs through an RME UC->Cubase->FIO pre amp->Beyerdynamics DT880. Different applications for different environments. I LOVE putting vinyl on when I’m with my wife. We don’t enjoy the fidelity any more than if we popped on a CD or an MP3 but the vibe is enhanced by dropping the needle, taking turns choosing the record and going to flip it when the groove runs out. In those moments, filing through a collection of CDs just somehow wouldn’t create the same atmosphere. There’s a romance component involved that can’t be quantified the same way as if we were using our phones.

  12. #36

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    Digital for sure. Went streaming digital on my home audio system a few years ago, and it works great. Qobuz hi-res ethernet streaming into a high-end DAC and downstream stack - superb sound, selection and convenience.

  13. #37

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    I used to enjoy reading the liner notes while the album was playing, but having to listen to just one album at a time, then put another one in, and having to carry the things around, got old. I listen to music away from home as much as I do at home, and carrying CDs and a CD player around just doesn't cut it any more. I can listen from my phone and get higher quality, hands free. On a long trip, I don't want to bother trying to change CDs in traffic, out of a pile of dozens. I have my entire library available entirely without touching anything. One benefit of streaming is that you don't see (or hear) boom boxes any more. People listen via earbuds and don't bother the entire neighborhood. I have a lot of CDs sitting on shelves, but I long ago ripped all that I care about. I have that music on multiple drives at home, and in the cloud, so if the house burns down, and the CDs are melted, I don't lose much. High quality music I rip to FLAC, but that's overkill for stuff like the Goodman sextet/septet, where the audio quality is low to start with. MP3 works for those. People don't listen to music from wax tubes on windup players now, vinyl is having a brief revival but likely won't last forever, and 78rpm players are long gone. Technology increases, often exponentially, and CDs are obsolete, as are icemen and buggy whip makers. You may want to fight it, but you will have better luck tilting at windmills.

  14. #38

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    I've always only enjoyed listening to my records.
    I never moved to CD or subsequent digital stuff.
    Speakers each 12 cubic ft like washer/dryer pair.
    Amplification comprises 14 tubes over 4 chassis.
    Two turntables look like from the planet Saturn.

  15. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by nevershouldhavesoldit
    The joys of comprehensive liner notes and great cover art are largely unknown in the digital age, and they’re a critical part of the joy of recorded music.
    A critical part you say? So you can't really enjoy recorded music without them?
    That's dumb.
    Last edited by Marcel_A; 07-24-2021 at 06:06 AM.

  16. #40

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  17. #41

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    CDs still make me feel sick because they remind me of when I was a kid and I only had a few stupid CDs to listen to and I would listen to them because I loved music but it also sucked the life out of me a little.

  18. #42

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    Hmm…I have about 14 metres of CDs and about 4 metres of vinyls. I side worked some years as a pop/rock critic and did a quarter century a radio program with music so over half of the collection is for professional means.

    Nowadays I listen mostly while writing for the radio (= that’s my work) and I listen my music from Spotify. Mainly same albums that I have on CDs!

  19. #43

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    I still have some Big Band Jazz and Blues 78's. I don't listen to them much as I have to change the needle on turntable.
    Thanks John

  20. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    A critical part you say? So you can't really enjoy recorded music without them?
    That's dumb.
    One of my greatest pleasures is putting an ounce or two of a good Scotch into a glass, taking out an old album I love, going through the “ritual’ of cleaning it, putting it on my turntable (the Thorens TD125 with SME arm I bought in 1969), dropping the needle, and listening while sipping my drink and reading the cover & liner notes. I think about the musicians and tunes. I remember how and where I got the album and I look at the photos and art on the jacket and sleeve. Sometimes I play along with a tune or two that I particularly love. This is big pleasure for me.

    It’s a joy that cannot be lessened by sarcasm and others’ failure to appreciate it. I urge that those with the physical and emotional capacity to enjoy it give it a try. Further, the notes on the 2000+ 33s and 78s in my collection are an invaluable library to which I often make reference. Being able to do so is another critical part of my enjoyment of music, especially as so much information on the web about the music is wrong or incomplete. And those who adopt misinformation as truth further pollute the history of jazz and music in general.

    What’s dumb is rejecting something you don’t think is important or valid simply because you don’t know or don’t like it yourself. I hope you can open your mind a little and let more good experiences into your life. Your current attitude is a bit harsh. I wish you well.

  21. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by nevershouldhavesoldit
    It’s a joy that cannot be lessened by sarcasm and others’ failure to appreciate it. I urge that those with the physical and emotional capacity to enjoy it give it a try.
    I did this for years (i drank something different). It's not that i don't apreciate this. I do.
    But it has nothing to do with enjoying music. I could as easily be about enjoying your scotch.

    I read the saterday paper alone, early, cup of thee or coffee, just after breakfast. I never could enjoy the news in a digital way? Nonsense. I could have the same feeling with a book, a website or whatever. Your just being sentimental.

  22. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    I did this for years (i drank something different). It's not that i don't apreciate this. I do.
    But it has nothing to do with enjoying music. I could as easily be about enjoying your scotch.

    I read the saterday paper alone, early, cup of thee or coffee, just after breakfast. I never could enjoy the news in a digital way? Nonsense. I could have the same feeling with a book, a website or whatever. Your just being sentimental.
    You’re correct - part of my pleasure is rooted in sentimentality. That’s because I knew many of the players on those albums, played with some, met and talked to others, and took my inspiration from many. I developed my style, chops and approach to music from those albums and all the people who made them, from players and composers to engineers and producers. The stories behind the recording of Kind of Blue are fascinating looks into the evolution of jazz and the recording arts (eg using the basement of the old church in which it was recorded as a crude echo chamber). I saw Wes at a small Boston club on my 21st birthday from a stageside table. I got to talk to him for about 10 minutes on a break, and I remember that night every time I listen to him.

    But appreciation of the past is not the same as sentimentality, and the joy (OK, my joy - YMMV) is multifaceted - it’s educational, sentimental, musical, sensual, relaxing, exciting, and more. There’s still much to be learned by each of us from most albums, and I learn something new each time I listen to one or read an authoritative old liner note. Hearing the music is great, but the whole enchilada contains so much more.

    The liner notes were often written by fellow musicians or noted music people like Bill Evans and Leonard Feather. And the pictures often show instruments in the hands of young players that are not remembered when those players got old and famous. The picture of Joe Pass playing a Jazzmaster on Sounds of Synanon is so cool and so vital to understanding that how you sound is largely in your chops that it should be given to every player who thinks he or she can buy someone else’s sound. Every jazz guitarist should have a copy of that album and be made to listen to it without knowing who the guitarist is or what instrument he’s playing.

  23. #47

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    If i listen to a new album via Apple music i look up the artist online and check out background information via wikipedia, the artists website.

  24. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    If i listen to a new album via Apple music i look up the artist online and check out background information via wikipedia, the artists website.
    I’m very happy to hear that! That’s great and another way to get info. Just be aware that a lot of what you find on Wikipedia is incomplete and unverified, especially about more esoteric topics like jazz and jazz history. Sidemen are often uncredited or misidentified, and many dates & other facts are incorrect on Wikipedia when checked against primary sources.

    Info about current releases is mostly accurate and easy to verify if it seems off. But if you want to know something about Rob McConnell’s Umbrella direct-to-disc double album from 1977 (Big Band Jazz) beyond the year it was made and the fact that it won the 1978 Juno Award, you won’t find it there. I have the original vinyl, and the liner notes border on encyclopedic.

  25. #49

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    All my music is digitized, but I still buy vinyl and CDs when I find them in antique stores or used book sales. Then I put them on my iPod. Which, I know, is obsolete.

    The problem with music on demand is that I don't always know what I want. I like digging through a bin of old records. Browsing online is just not the same.
    But I am rather old.....

  26. #50

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    My misgivings about vinyl vs. digital in terms of sound quality have to do with generalization and the heaping helpings of conformation bias in this debate. “Analog sounds better.” Really? AM radio through a transistor radio with a 1” speaker sounds like crap. So does uncompressed digital audio played through the same 1” speaker sound like crap. The entire signal chain, including the listener’s own ears, is rarely considered.