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  1. #1

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    I am a longtime fan of the telecaster and I’m aware of a couple in-depth books covering the history, development, and minutiae of the Telecaster. Is there a similar book that shows the landscape of various archtop designs, brands, and developments over time?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by markesquire View Post
    I am a longtime fan of the telecaster and I’m aware of a couple in-depth books covering the history, development, and minutiae of the Telecaster. Is there a similar book that shows the landscape of various archtop designs, brands, and developments over time?
    Rudy’s in Soho has a book out there. Coffee table book, $275.00. I have it, not bad.

  4. #3

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    There is a book on D'Angelico & D'Aquisto called Acquired of the Angels. Excellent.

    There's also one on the ES-175 and another on the L-5, I believe, both by the author of the histories of the Tele and the Strat IIRC.

    There was one covering the history of Gibson archtops, haven't seen it in 25 years.

    I'm reading Epiphone the House of Stathopoulo now; very detailed.

  5. #4

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    Adrian Ingram has made a book about ES-175 and L-5. Some say that there is inaccuracies but the details are easily found from internet. I have the ES-175 book and have enjoyed it a lot.

    Julius Bellson's The Gibson Story is not exactly an archtop book, but very interesting story about Gibson company's first decades seen from inside. Copy of book is for sale here and there but it has been downloadable in pdf format too. I have it downloaded, but I don't remember where I found it and can't find the source now.

    And yes, Julius Bellson was an uncle of the drummer Louis Bellson!

    Of course there is more books: [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.85)]The Gibson Super 400: Art of the Fine Guitar, [/COLOR][COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.85)]VanHoose, Thomas. San Francisco: GPI Books, 1991.

    [/COLOR]Is there an “Archtop Book?”-ingrames175-png

    Is there an “Archtop Book?”-thegibsonstory-png

  6. #5

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    In addition to the ones mentioned above, the Guild Guitar book by Hans Moust also is an excellent read, certainly recommended

  7. #6

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    Is there an “Archtop Book?”-productimage-picture-guitars-tsumura-collection-43393-jpg

  8. #7

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    Not so much history but really great book. Recommended.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  9. #8

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    Sorry! Something went wrong!


    This one isn't bad either.......no affiliation w/ seller etc etc......

    I saw it available now in paperback, but I'd try to find the hardcover, just because there's some good photography.

  10. #9

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    Bob Benedetto's Making a Archtop Guitar gives lots of insight into the instruments.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by markesquire View Post
    I am a longtime fan of the telecaster and I’m aware of a couple in-depth books covering the history, development, and minutiae of the Telecaster. Is there a similar book that shows the landscape of various archtop designs, brands, and developments over time?
    No such book exists.

    There is no shortage of brand-specific books, as mentioned above.

  12. #11

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    I've learned a great deal from Tom van Hoose's "The Art Of Jazz Guitar" where he goes on about the history and development of the Gibson Super-400 models in exhausting detail. The L5, the Emperor and a few other models are also mentioned. Very informative and well illustrated book, NO MOJO what-so-ever, just facts.

  13. #12

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    I recently sold all my guitar books. So 20th century. The Chinery book comes close but will cost $$$. Spend some quality time at guitarhq.com, and the previously sold section at archtop.com. That and a half dozen bad purchases of vintage archtops will qualify you as an expert in this peanut gallery.

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    Is there an “Archtop Book?”-productimage-picture-guitars-tsumura-collection-43393-jpg
    That Tsumura book was rarer than hens' teeth and beautifully presented. I was in NY one time and I went to Rudy's where somebody had just discovered a box of unopened tissue paper wrapped editions of these books. They just put one out on the counter, the guy next to me bought it on the spot. I bought the rest of the box.
    They have been Christmas presents for my most dedicated archtop playing friends since. It's even got a gallery worthy photo of the D'Angelico owned by Pete Townsend.
    I heard that Tsumura, a pharm tycoon in Japan had come upon hard times at some point and sold off much of this collection. So this publication does mark a high point in the convergence of some of the greatest guitars in the world, never to be reunited again.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    ...I heard that Tsumura, a pharm tycoon in Japan had come upon hard times at some point and sold off much of this collection. So this publication does mark a high point in the convergence of some of the greatest guitars in the world, never to be reunited again.
    IIRC, he got thrown in jail for being a tax cheat. I suspect that his guitar collection was sold off to cover costs. Not sure if he was able to keep his far more significant banjo collection.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    IIRC, he got thrown in jail for being a tax cheat. I suspect that his guitar collection was sold off to cover costs. Not sure if he was able to keep his far more significant banjo collection.
    AFAIK he did not , the Banjos were confiscated in order to be sold off. Mac Yasuda, another noted japanese collector, bought a large part of the collection, some were sold/shipped to the US and the rest of their history is shrouded in mist ... since the international market for vintage banjos is so much smaller than that for guitars I have doubts that we'll ever hear or learn more. Banjo players and banjos are the subject of many jokes, yes but outside of Bluegrass music this instrument is just not seen or heard anymore. It's sad in some ways but that's just how the world turns I guess ....