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  1. #1

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    Given the interest in the tune here I thought I'd post a recording of "Wave" that I did over 15 years ago. In my late 40s, no glasses yet. On the 175 that I still have.

    Too many notes? Hell, yes. I was very into that at the time. Probably was listening too Martino too much at the time ...

    Hope you like nonetheless! I like the crisp sound of the 175 in this one. I think I recorded directly at the time.

    Viva la 175!


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    One of my favorite charts, and you play it very well. The ES-175 sounds great, I might add.

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    One of my favorite charts, and you play it very well. The ES-175 sounds great, I might add.
    I tell you, it's the mahogany!

    DB

  5. #4

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    Great playing!Very nice sound.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    Given the interest in the tune here I thought I'd post a recording of "Wave" that I did over 15 years ago. In my late 40s, no glasses yet. On the 175 that I still have.

    Too many notes? Hell, yes. I was very into that at the time. Probably was listening too Martino too much at the time ...

    Hope you like nonetheless! I like the crisp sound of the 175 in this one. I think I recorded directly at the time.

    Viva la 175!

    You did a very nice job on that one VIVA JOBIM!!! Do you know in Jann Ackermann is still playing live?

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    You did a very nice job on that one VIVA JOBIM!!! Do you know in Jann Ackermann is still playing live?
    Thanks. Yes, Jan is still playing live. He is in his 70s now ...

    DB

  8. #7

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    DB,

    That's a great sound on a great guitar! Today, I was playing guitar with a friend and we were both playing ES175D's, a '55 p90 and '72 Humbucker, switching back and forth between guitars to listen for differences, and tube amps with the old architecture, a Sequel Skoter and Headstrong Vibroverb. Man, what fun, and the experience of the perpetual renewal of appreciation for the Iconic ES175! Just WoW!

    Thanks for sharing!

    S

  9. #8

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    Great guitar and great guitarist. Just the right amount of notes if you ask me.....

  10. #9

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    Great playing DB, the 175 sounds terrific, thanks for sharing
    a pleasant start to the day.

  11. #10

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    That was excellent. Ok, now I know what thunk is.. not too many notes. You knew when to turn it up and you did it well.
    Really nice DB.
    JD

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by skykomishone
    DB,

    That's a great sound on a great guitar! Today, I was playing guitar with a friend and we were both playing ES175D's, a '55 p90 and '72 Humbucker, switching back and forth between guitars to listen for differences, and tube amps with the old architecture, a Sequel Skoter and Headstrong Vibroverb. Man, what fun, and the experience of the perpetual renewal of appreciation for the Iconic ES175! Just WoW!

    Thanks for sharing!

    S
    In the end, a 175 is all you need. There are plenty of great sounding guitars out there that cater to all kinds of individual preferences. But the 175 is all you need for a truly classic jazz sound.

    DB

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by skykomishone
    DB, That's a great sound on a great guitar! Today, I was playing guitar with a friend and we were both playing ES175D's, a '55 p90 and '72 Humbucker, switching back and forth between guitars to listen for differences, and tube amps with the old architecture, a Sequel Skoter and Headstrong Vibroverb. Man, what fun, and the experience of the perpetual renewal of appreciation for the Iconic ES175! Just WoW! Thanks for sharing! S
    Thanks Sky. Interesting. So what was your conclusion after comparing these two?

    DB

  14. #13

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    DB,

    You and that 175 were meant to be together. Such a meaty, clear, round tone from the guitar and such great articulation on your part. I really enjoyed this. Thank you for sharing!

    Roli

  15. #14

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    I am still dumbfounded that Gibson stopped making the iconic 175 4 years ago.
    That Levi guy needs to go back to making jeans.

  16. #15

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    "Too many notes?" I thunk not! Your deft articulation never flagged, and the lines never lost their interest. Bravo!

  17. #16

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    I've reported this before: At NAMM in January 2020 two Gibson reps independently assured me that ES-175 will return. They gave no time horizon; whichever then, it may have changed since. Taking an archtop back to production after many years' pause doesn't happen just like that. Those in the know may have retired or found another job in the meantime. Will they find everything needed under the tarpaulins and mothballs? How many times have we read about signature models that have been recreated by taking the exact measurements and specs of a particular historic guitar? To me this means that there's always been (small) variation in construction, materials, electronics etc. As an aside, I wonder if this Forum could ever agree on the specs for the "Comeback" ES-175: mahogany vs. maple, volute or none, neck size and profile, HB or P-90, one or two PU's, zigzag or trapeze tailpiece etc?

    I'm not the one who derailed the thread from a great performance to the great guitar used. "Wave" is one of my all-time favorites, and this was a sublime version of it. More notes than I make in a week, true, but that's my problem, not Dutchbopper's. Thunks!!!

  18. #17

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    Shmokey....

    you know, of the Jobim Bossas I always feel
    Wave is one that invites a bit of boppery...

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    In the end, a 175 is all you need. There are plenty of great sounding guitars out there that cater to all kinds of individual preferences. But the 175 is all you need for a truly classic jazz sound.

    DB
    DB~ Once again you've simultaneously given us a beautiful rendition of a classic song AND taken us lesser humans to school. Man, I love your phrasing, touch and patience as you play. And that ES-175 loves you right back. Bravo!

  20. #19

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    You so nailed those first four notes! And all the rest, but those first four notes just had me. Such a fabulous tone!!!

  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Shmokey....

    you know, of the Jobim Bossas I always feel
    Wave is one that invites a bit of boppery...
    I have only one voice, so this is the stuff I will play over any tune. I hardly adapt my “language” to a specific tune or sub genre like bossa, bebop, mainstream or ballad ... The only thing that comes to mind is that latin and bossa will have me double timing a lot but for the rest, the bop will be the same. Do you adapt your “voice” or “language” to the tune? How would that work?

    DB


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  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    I have only one voice, so this is the stuff I will play over any tune. I hardly adapt my “language” to a specific tune or sub genre like bossa, bebop, mainstream or ballad ... The only thing that comes to mind is that latin and bossa will have me double timing a lot but for the rest, the bop will be the same. Do you adapt your “voice” or “language” to the tune? How would that work?

    DB


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    If it isn't broken, why fix it? ;-)

  23. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    If it isn't broken, why fix it? ;-)
    Yeah, but maybe that is not what Christian meant. I have seen this type of comment in the virtual jam section too. You know, that sounds particularly boppy and that sounds very bluesy. To me it's all one language/voice/vocabulary with a common foundation. I would not know how to sound "unboppy."

    The only different language I speak is the blues/rock voice. That is a totally different thing. Played that stuff for 25 years in all kinds of bands and whenever I do that it's like speaking a different language.

    DB

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    Yeah, but maybe that is not what Christian meant. I have seen this type of comment in the virtual jam section too. You know, that sounds particularly boppy and that sounds very bluesy. To me it's all one language/voice/vocabulary with a common foundation. I would not know how to sound "unboppy."

    The only different language I speak is the blues/rock voice. That is a totally different thing. Played that stuff for 25 years in all kinds of bands and whenever I do that it's like speaking a different language.

    DB
    I agree it's one language/common vocabulary, but there's different accents.

    Grant Green sounds different on a blues than Jim Hall, for example.

    At any rate, I really enjoyed your playing here.

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I agree it's one language/common vocabulary, but there's different accents.

    Grant Green sounds different on a blues than Jim Hall, for example.

    At any rate, I really enjoyed your playing here.
    Agreed. It's probably a non debate. Grant and Jim are speaking the same language but only with a different accent ... The point is, to me it's all bop derived (even if you put a different label on it).

    DB

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    I have only one voice, so this is the stuff I will play over any tune. I hardly adapt my “language” to a specific tune or sub genre like bossa, bebop, mainstream or ballad ... The only thing that comes to mind is that latin and bossa will have me double timing a lot but for the rest, the bop will be the same. Do you adapt your “voice” or “language” to the tune? How would that work?

    DB


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    Great question!

    So I’m not thinking here of anything you are doing, which always sounds great, but rather what I’ve been interested in as a player, and this question cuts to the core of it.

    As with most things I’m a Peter Bernstein fan boy and i just like his approach which is very much not to ‘throw notes on chords’ as he put it - which is my natural tendency - but instead focus on resources from the tunes melody.

    I find this a good counter balance for a few years of basically doing Barry Harris stuff which gave me some facility on bop tunes, but specifically in the Bossa rep I never felt as if my approach at that time sounded good on tunes like Inutil Paisagem, Insensatez etc when I played them live.

    Paradoxically I find working from the melody helps me improvise more freely than just doing the usual process. I play stuff I’d never play by ‘default.’

    (The other thing is I find myself playing chords a lot more, probably a by product of the fact that I mostly play without piano. It’s amazing how far just a little bit of single note playing will go in that setting... my default setting is to MASSIVELY overplay.)

    I used to be more worried that by changing my process, I might lose my identity as a player in some way, but I find that my voice will come out whether I like it or not haha. I actually think style/voice/identity is one of those things that you can’t change. It just is. Bruce Forman had a good quote about that.

    I think everyone has to find their own way of doing stuff...

    Anyway please don’t take this this is a critique of anyone else’s approach. Just a reflection on my own recent feelings and thoughts as a player.

    Sounding great as always!
    Last edited by christianm77; 05-19-2021 at 10:49 AM.