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  1. #1

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    Amidst all the 10k vintage Gibson archtops, the most humble of them, the ES 125 remains a true gem. Prices have been going up however.

    In the vintage ES department, it has it all. Mahogany neck and sides. Maple top and back. P90 pup, light build and very responsive. This lil' guitar always makes me happy. So here's a happy song for you. All EQ on the amp (Mambo 10 jazz amp) is flat. Tone pots on the guitar all open.

    The tune is a latin version of "I Love You."

    DB


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Yes, indeed! That ES-125, as you and others have shown, makes some great music.

  4. #3

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    Of all the jazzboxes I have lusted after, I feel like the ES-125 is the one I really need to own someday, at least for awhile.

  5. #4

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    You only need an ES-125....... ;-)

    Even if you want to play it with overdrive, wah wah and delay:


  6. #5

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    DB,
    Great sounding guitar.Very nice fat jazz sound.
    Beautiful jazz lines and great phrasing - that's it.
    I can hear a lot of musical knowledge in your playing.
    Beautiful jazz lines and great phrasing - that's it.
    Thanks for playing beautifully.
    Best
    Kris
    ps.
    Often, guitarists start playing jazz standards, not knowing how much work and time it takes to complete the task.

  7. #6

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    When i grow up that's how I want to play! This really puts me in mind of Jimmy Raney.

  8. #7

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    Great tone, great playing and proof positive that a cutaway is an optional tool in the quest to play jazz guitar at a high level.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    Great tone, great playing and proof positive that a cutaway is an optional tool in the quest to play jazz guitar at a high level.
    Thanks Stringswinger. The absence of a cutaway does not bother me much indeed. I used to own an ES 300 and it sounded as great as my ES 350.

    DB

  10. #9

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    Very nice.

    Latin lovers are the best!

  11. #10

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    The ES-125 is a jazz guitar for the people. And it can make such lovely music!

    That is a happy tune, happily played, and happily heard. Thanks, DB!

  12. #11

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    lovely !

    i esp like the lick at 2.18

    fab man

  13. #12

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    The best sound of the guitar is in the cello register as I call it from 3-10 frets. Extend it 2 more frets in each direction no need for a cutaway at all. The energy and sound is the best and DB you need cut a recording and do an old fashion CD, I would buy it in a heartbeat. I heard a famous well know guitar player recently play and while the playing was fine your touch and sound exceeds this pretty well known player. It further proves that because someone has a BIG NAME does not necessarily mean they have it up on everyone else.

    I will stand to correct myself you could be well know in Europe, I don't know but for sure on the jazzguitar.be your are one of the big name players!

  14. #13

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    It’s quite hard to play hothouse without a cutaway

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    It’s quite hard to play hothouse without a cutaway
    I prefer to play bop heads in the lowest possible register, a la Joe Pass so it would probably no problem. Bop heads sound better IMHO on the lower strings. More thunk. "I Love You" got the same treatment.

    DB


  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    I prefer to play bop heads in the lowest possible register, a la Joe Pass so it would probably no problem. Bop heads sound better IMHO on the lower strings. More thunk. "I Love You" got the same treatment.

    DB

    I suppose you can always transpose bits of it down an octave too.

    Very well, cutaways are senseless.

    TBH I spend most of my playing life quite happily in the baritone-tenor range... And I don’t feel disadvantaged much by a guitar without a cutaway.

  17. #16

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    BTW, in terms of thunk, I think my 175 is sounding exceptionally thunky atm. This may be because the strings on it are now several hundred years old.

    It is rather pleasing, if utterly useless for anything requiring sustain. But then - I have a telecaster for that.

    I shall record some bebop it and see if you DB, as the acknowledged thunkfinder general mock my miserable levels of thunk or whether you think the thunk might be worthy of acceptance among the higher echelons of thunk.

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    The best sound of the guitar is in the cello register as I call it from 3-10 frets. Extend it 2 more frets in each direction no need for a cutaway at all. The energy and sound is the best and DB you need cut a recording and do an old fashion CD, I would buy it in a heartbeat. I heard a famous well know guitar player recently play and while the playing was fine your touch and sound exceeds this pretty well known player. It further proves that because someone has a BIG NAME does not necessarily mean they have it up on everyone else. I will stand to correct myself you could be well know in Europe, I don't know but for sure on the jazzguitar.be your are one of the big name players!
    You are too kind Mark. Many thanks. Nah I am not a big name in Europe, lol. My "fame" (note the quotation marks) is strictly internet based. My style is probably not modern enough to appeal to contemporary jazz audiences. I prefer to play standards in a bop style that most would call dated but since I do not live off my music (I'd starve) I can do whatever I like and I do it with passion and have always taken it seriously. I love contemporary and modern jazz guitar too but only for listening. And in my old age, I feel I am still getting better.

    I love high energy playing, it is my thing, it's the way I hear the music. Tal Farlow, early Joe Pass, Pat Martino, Bireli, Andreas Oberg etc. etc. My kind of guys.

    DB

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    BTW, in terms of thunk, I think my 175 is sounding exceptionally thunky atm. This may be because the strings on it are now several hundred years old.

    It is rather pleasing, if utterly useless for anything requiring sustain. But then - I have a telecaster for that.

    I shall record some bebop it and see if you DB, as the acknowledged thunkfinder general mock my miserable levels of thunk or whether you think the thunk might be worthy of acceptance among the higher echelons of thunk.
    You have a vintage 175 right? I'd say a potential thunk machine.

    But ... thunk is a weird thing. It's a mysterious and elusive mix of what is in your fingers, guitar and amp. To isolate the variables that constitute it, is next to impossible. Renowned physicists have tried it for years, but to no avail yet. The search goes on ...

    Record that bop tune and a committee of wise old men will assess the level of thunk. Good luck!

    DB

  20. #19
    Hi Dutchbopper

    nice to meet you online, I have seen some of your videos and can be considered a fan.
    great guitars, great playing.
    It is good to see the joy the jazzguitar brings into your Life.
    You do not look bitter and sad while playing guitar.




    I got no videos to show - I am just getting into Jazz, slowly - but I have a super nice ES-125 from 1947 and the
    matching amp to boot, the GA-50 "Jim Hall amp" from 1949.

    hope you enjoy it, kind regards.

    Jan


  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Filmosound 621
    Hi Dutchbopper

    nice to meet you online, I have seen some of your videos and can be considered a fan.
    great guitars, great playing.
    It is good to see the joy the jazzguitar brings into your Life.
    You do not look bitter and sad while playing guitar.




    I got no videos to show - I am just getting into Jazz, slowly - but I have a super nice ES-125 from 1947 and the
    matching amp to boot, the GA-50 "Jim Hall amp" from 1949.

    hope you enjoy it, kind regards.

    Jan

    Many thanks. Glad you like my stuff. Great guitar and amp Jan! Are you Dutch?

    DB

  22. #21
    no, I am an evil German.

    rrrr.

    my ES has the first generation P90 pick-up with non-adjustable pole pieces.

    it is a very well used guitar that has lots and lots of songs in it.

    I am so happy that it came into my Life.


    your ES-350 is the one I like best - a true dream guitar.

    happy playing.

    Last edited by Filmosound 621; 04-20-2021 at 05:01 PM.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Filmosound 621
    Hi Dutchbopper

    nice to meet you online, I have seen some of your videos and can be considered a fan.
    great guitars, great playing.
    It is good to see the joy the jazzguitar brings into your Life.
    You do not look bitter and sad while playing guitar.




    I got no videos to show - I am just getting into Jazz, slowly - but I have a super nice ES-125 from 1947 and the
    matching amp to boot, the GA-50 "Jim Hall amp" from 1949.

    hope you enjoy it, kind regards.

    Jan


  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    You only need an ES-125....... ;-)

    Even if you want to play it with overdrive, wah wah and delay:

    Nice use of feedback with that electric Jazz solo. Reminded me of something Miles Davis would have done. I see that ES-125 is truly versatile.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    It’s quite hard to play hothouse without a cutaway
    It’s quite hard to play hothouse ....

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    I see that ES-125 is truly versatile.
    that is very true.

    my ES-125 wants to rock.

    it pairs wonderfully with the larger Gibson GA-200 Amp, played at the edge of feedback.




    here is the family shot with my amp collection again, the ES-125 loves all of them - as much as I do.