Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Some easy Hammond swing on the ES 350. They are very rare guitars, especially the blonde ones ...

    DB


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    That's sensational. The tone... couldn't be better. The touch, just perfect. I'd dial in and listen to that anytime. Thanks for keeping the bop flame burning bright and hot!

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    If that isn’t classic bop tone than I don’t know what is.
    That old Gibson plywood was really special.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Great improv too DB!

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I dig the ambered lacquer on the 350 and more than that, the fine playing!

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Sweet & swingin' - thanks, DB!

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Gibson SHOULD have reissued this guitar long since.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Really nice sound and playing, as expected!

    Goes so well with that organ groove, you can’t beat it.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Is Tal back ?

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    GT is probably right. I'm a huge Gibson fan, namely their vintage models, but sometimes am baffled at their archtop reissue choices.
    In the 90s I believe they reissued the ES-150 w/Christian pickup, but not the deluxe ES-250? Neither would touch an original soundwise, but still, even from a visual standpoint a 250 reissue woulda been cool, especially w/ '39 stairstep headstock
    And a '34 L-5 w/blockmarkers but not the classis/more desirable dot neck 20's model w/the cupids bow fingerboard?
    Ah, Gibson.....
    Granted making $ is the bottom line for a company, and archtops today aren't especially profitable but they reissued the L-7C some yrs ago, I imagine at the time there'd have been as much interest in a 250, or 350.
    But kind of a moot point as they're not even making 175's anymore, just shaking my head at their past reissue choices.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    Gibson SHOULD have reissued this guitar long since.
    Yeah. A slightly deeper bodied Tal Farlow, leave out the scroll and put 2 P90 pups on it and there you go! Should be no big deal.

    The ES 350 is a lot lighter than my Tal Farlow though. A way lighter build.

    DB

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    Yeah. A slightly deeper bodied Tal Farlow, leave out the scroll and put 2 P90 pups on it and there you go! Should be no big deal.

    The ES 350 is a lot lighter than my Tal Farlow though. A way lighter build.

    DB
    THAT is the problem : by the early 60's Gibson had simply lost the guys who knew how to "size" the plywood for these types of guitars - they also reacted to the rising stage volume
    during the 60's and 70's, the guitars got extremely heavy in order to raise the feedback threshold , thereby losing the fine response they previously had.
    A re-issue would have the same problem I'm afraid.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Great sound and playing!

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    DB, you are awesome.

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by gitman
    THAT is the problem : by the early 60's Gibson had simply lost the guys who knew how to "size" the plywood for these types of guitars - they also reacted to the rising stage volume
    during the 60's and 70's, the guitars got extremely heavy in order to raise the feedback threshold , thereby losing the fine response they previously had.
    A re-issue would have the same problem I'm afraid.
    Interesting points. They did not have the expertise to produce lighter laminate plates anymore? How did that come about? I always thought it was more of a deliberate choice to diminish feedback issues and prevent warranty claims?

    And what about the VOS ES laminate series of recent years? Are these laminates heavier too than the ones used in the 50s?

    But the difference in the thickness of laminate plates used in vintage and contemporary ES guitars is striking indeed. Maybe other glues too?

    DB

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchbopper
    Interesting points. They did not have the expertise to produce lighter laminate plates anymore? How did that come about? I always thought it was more of a deliberate choice to diminish feedback issues and prevent warranty claims?

    And what about the VOS ES laminate series of recent years? Are these laminates heavier too than the ones used in the 50s?

    But the difference in the thickness of laminate plates used in vintage and contemporary ES guitars is striking indeed. Maybe other glues too?

    DB
    I have a 59 VOS 175 reissue and it is a 6.5 pound guitar, which is as light as any 50's 175 that I have ever played. I believe the heavier builds of the 60's on up were deliberate. With a heavier build, three things were accomplished:

    1. Greater volume before feedback

    2. Fewer warranty claims

    3. Cost savings from being able to use heavier woods

    All of that said, the heavier built, modern Gibson archtops deliver a darker tone which has it's own merits and are preferred by many.