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  1. #1

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    I really like this one. A small hollow thin line and humbuckers with a variable tone switch. It has some bracing under the top to anchor the bridge and pickups but no center block. $1000 Canadian.

    AMH90 | AM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    Cool


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  4. #3

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    Totally Hollow like an ES-330 Gibson ? Interesting how they are competing with that Hipster market trend like Collings.

    I like the new Eastman Romeo laminate with a trem in blue as well.
    Listed on their website available Summer 2021

  5. #4

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    interesting how can it be hollow without
    a trapese tailpiece Jim ?

    wouldn’t it just want to rip off its tailpiece ?

    maybe it’s constructed like a flat-top acoustic or something ?

    cool tho

  6. #5

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    It has a trapeze tailpiece. At least in the video, that one does.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    interesting how can it be hollow without
    a trapese tailpiece Jim ?

    wouldn’t it just want to rip off its tailpiece ?

    maybe it’s constructed like a flat-top acoustic or something ?

    cool tho
    It has a trapeze tail piece . Also full hollow bodies can have bigsbys and Tom bridges with the tone bar for support


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  8. #7

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    Very cool guitar. Nice snappy sound. I'd play one of these.

  9. #8
    A little like a Casino (330). I had one Ibanez made a while ago, thin, full hollow, Bigsby. I put a trapeze on it and a floating archtop bridge. It's got the vibe of a full hollow in a small thinline feel. I love that guitar.
    I made it from junker parts when I worked at Ibanez (Hoshino) and it turned out to be one of my favourite guitars. Thinline hollow is such a great combo, I'm sorry there's not more out there in this niche.
    Come to think of it, D'Angelico made a thinline hollow single cutaway a while back. Another guitar with a small body, big sound. Very short lived in their lineup. I guess people don't want guitars like that.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    interesting how can it be hollow without
    a trapese tailpiece Jim ?

    wouldn’t it just want to rip off its tailpiece ?

    maybe it’s constructed like a flat-top acoustic or something ?

    cool tho
    They explain the construction in this video from Andertons. It has braces (I assume hardwood) glued under the bridge and pickups that act as anchors for the screws. My Turkish guitar works the same way and it's very stable. I love the size of this guitar.


  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    A little like a Casino (330). I had one Ibanez made a while ago, thin, full hollow, Bigsby. I put a trapeze on it and a floating archtop bridge. It's got the vibe of a full hollow in a small thinline feel. I love that guitar.
    I made it from junker parts when I worked at Ibanez (Hoshino) and it turned out to be one of my favourite guitars. Thinline hollow is such a great combo, I'm sorry there's not more out there in this niche.
    Come to think of it, D'Angelico made a thinline hollow single cutaway a while back. Another guitar with a small body, big sound. Very short lived in their lineup. I guess people don't want guitars like that.
    Do you remember what the model designation was of that D'Angelico? I tried one at a store a few years ago and liked it.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    Do you remember what the model designation was of that D'Angelico? I tried one at a store a few years ago and liked it.
    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    interesting how can it be hollow without
    a trapese tailpiece Jim ?

    wouldn’t it just want to rip off its tailpiece ?

    maybe it’s constructed like a flat-top acoustic or something ?

    cool tho
    Jim, I've sold that guitar but I have the records in the shop, I'll get back if nobody else does. It was a blue grey finish, very handsome instrument. It was a laminate top with a small wood block glued to the top that didn't contact the back- fully suspended, so there was plenty of mass there to resist the torque and anchor the threaded posts directly to the top. The top was truly free vibrating yet controlled in amplified situations. Kind of a brilliant hybrid IMHO.

    It was always a mystery to me why these guitars were only offered for a couple of years. My only conclusion is those people who really loved it, players who played jazz a lot and appreciated the nuance and subtlety of the vibrating top, already had full hollows and didn't need another guitar. And those who didn't know enough about their own playing to "get it" were heavily indoctrinated into the "three types of guitar" world; it wasn't as sexy as a heavily hyped semi or an L-5 they strove to someday own. Hybrid instruments like that can be very special instruments, but they're not the heavy sellers that earn their right in a guitar company's lineup through instant high $$ influx. Scofield is a salesman for all traditional semis, Benson is a salesman for all hollows if you get my drift. That's why Ibanez took them into their family.
    We'll see how Ibanez does with this model. I have if feeling it'll be gone in a couple of years... unless they get a big name artist to carry the market cache for them.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    A little like a Casino (330). I had one Ibanez made a while ago, thin, full hollow, Bigsby. I put a trapeze on it and a floating archtop bridge. It's got the vibe of a full hollow in a small thinline feel. I love that guitar.
    I made it from junker parts when I worked at Ibanez (Hoshino) and it turned out to be one of my favourite guitars. Thinline hollow is such a great combo, I'm sorry there's not more out there in this niche.
    Come to think of it, D'Angelico made a thinline hollow single cutaway a while back. Another guitar with a small body, big sound. Very short lived in their lineup. I guess people don't want guitars like that.
    I did a similar thing with a model Sweetwater was selling - an AF-75T with a Bigsby-type tailpiece which I promptly discarded and replace with a generic trapeze TP I had lying around. Venetian cutaway, "Tourquoise" finish, definitely blue in the pix, surf green IRL. I loved that guitar. Light, balanced, nice volute, very comfortable to play, great sound - I gigged with it happily for a couple of years. Eventually I was going to donate it and an Epiphone Chet Atkins to the local high school, but my youngest granddaughter (acting as go-between) fell in love with it and still has it (still on the Dean's list working toward her Master's). So the school got the Chet Atkins, and the Green Guitar (as it is known) stayed in the family. It is the way of our people.
    Last edited by citizenk74; 03-21-2021 at 02:27 PM.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57 View Post
    Totally Hollow like an ES-330 Gibson ? Interesting how they are competing with that Hipster market trend like Collings.

    I like the new Eastman Romeo laminate with a trem in blue as well.
    Listed on their website available Summer 2021
    That hipster market trend Collings I30 costs $5500 and up. I think I will stick with the Ibanez.

    I have a Seventy-seven Guitars Exrubato Hollow and Exrubato Jazz with humbuckers that I bought back in 2011/2012. That hipster trend began before Collings put out its I30.

  15. #14

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    eastman makes a reasonably priced 330 style guitar too...

  16. #15

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    Looks good, sounds good and a little more affordable and available probably than the Eastmans.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmorash View Post
    Looks good, sounds good and a little more affordable and available probably than the Eastmans.
    someone is selling one of the eastmans on the forum currently.

  18. #17

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    I like that hipster trend though... There are some higher end Japanese alternatives by King Snake and Archtop Tribute. Epiphone is releasing a USA Casino, with Heritage selling its own copy at about $3k. Interesting move on Ibanez's part, including the nicer headstock, I hope they release a 16" version too.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    I really like this one. A small hollow thin line and humbuckers with a variable tone switch. It has some bracing under the top to anchor the bridge and pickups but no center block. $1000 Canadian.

    AMH90 | AM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars

    I understand the top is Linden/Basswood Jim ( may be wrong ) like many current Artcores. As a former builder, does this bother you? Not the best tonewood perhaps/dents easily etc.

    David

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcat View Post
    I understand the top is Linden/Basswood Jim ( may be wrong ) like many current Artcores. As a former builder, does this bother you? Not the best tonewood perhaps/dents easily etc.

    David
    Top, sides and back and no, it doesn't bother me a bit. Basswood is terribly under rated as a tone wood, mostly because it's not very pretty visually, but tonally it's very even and while it's softer than ash or maple, it's more than hard enough when its under a quality finish. It's been used in some much more expensive guitars than these for many years by several well know and respected builders. Ernie Ball/Music Man has a very informative page on their site about why they use basswood and it's worth reading.

    Why We Use Basswood For Our Instruments – Ernie Ball Music Man
    Last edited by Jim Soloway; 03-23-2021 at 07:37 PM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    Top, sides and back and no, it doesn't bother me a bit. Basswood is terribly under rated as a tone wood, mostly because it's not very pretty visually, but tonally it's very even and while it's softer than ash or maple, it's more than hard enough when its under a quality finish. It's been used in some much more expensive guitars than these for many years by several well know and respected builders. Ernie Ball/Music Man has a very informative page on their site about why they use basswood and it's worth reading.

    Why We Use Basswood For Our Instruments – Ernie Ball Music Man
    But they do say that: 'Basswood is a very full-bodied sounding tonewood, and it especially makes sense for us to utilize it when adding elements like maple tops to give the instrument the overall package for more cut and brightness.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcat View Post
    But they do say that: 'Basswood is a very full-bodied sounding tonewood, and it especially makes sense for us to utilize it when adding elements like maple tops to give the instrument the overall package for more cut and brightness.
    I'm not going to try to talk you out of something about which you've clearly made a decision but I am going to suggest that you watch this video. The tone is absolutely glorious from a guitar that's going to retail for $700 US.


  23. #22

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    Parker Fly guitar uses Basswood for it's necks with carbon strips on top to reinforce stability of its soft nature.
    Ken Parker said he was copying mid evil period flutes with soft woods encased with Ebony or harder woods for strength.

    I do think Collings makes wonderfully expensive instruments A+ ALL the way!
    That said they definitely have the Hip Younger artists playing them. Maybe they have endorsement deals to afford them?

  24. #23

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    Jim,

    Don't worry, it is highly likely that I will buy one ( and that is before watching this particular video - I have watched the Anderton's and Ibanez ones so far ) will you? My only concern is that buying online I may have a bad experience like the appalling ( only word to describe it ) example of an AS153 that a large French site sent me earlier this year. It bore no relation to the fit and finish of my 700€ AFJ95 which as a former associate/distributor of Peerless and Fibonacci ( design input ) I would say is up there with the best of them. So far, Thomann.fr and .de are saying 'Available in some months'. Hope to find one in a store locally which is how I grabbed my Eastman. Thanks for your valued input.

    Still liking your Little Jazz?

    David

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcat View Post
    Jim,

    Don't worry, it is highly likely that I will buy one ( and that is before watching this particular video - I have watched the Anderton's and Ibanez ones so far ) will you? My only concern is that buying online I may have a bad experience like the appalling ( only word to describe it ) example of an AS153 that a large French site sent me earlier this year. It bore no relation to the fit and finish of my 700€ AFJ95 which as a former associate/distributor of Peerless and Fibonacci ( design input ) I would say is up there with the best of them. So far, Thomann.fr and .de are saying 'Available in some months'. Hope to find one in a store locally which is how I grabbed my Eastman. Thanks for your valued input.

    Still liking your Little Jazz?

    David
    The Little Jazz stayed in Mexico when we moved back to Canada. It was just too expensive to ship any amplifiers.

    As for this guitar, they're not available yet but I'm certainly considering it. It checks a lot of boxes for me, especially the size and hollow body. I wish there wasn't quite such a markup in the price in Canada but such is the cost of living in a smaller market spread across a lot of geography.

  26. #25

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    seen this ?

    https://www.ibanez.com/eu/products/detail/am93me_5b_04.html

    pretty huh ?

    hopefully it’s also 330 style hollow
    annoyingly ibanez don’t say .... again !

    but they never seem to give this crucial detail !
    .... well it’s kinda crucial to us jazz players anyway

  27. #26

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    I really like this guitar. Not a fan of black finishes but it does check a lot of boxes.
    Now, my question is this: how is it possible that this other Ibanez AM2000 guitar retails for 4 times the price of the AMH90?

    OK, wood choices, tuners, electronics, immaculate craftsmanship, MIJ, I get it.
    But 4 times? Does it play 4 times better?

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by eblydian View Post
    I really like this guitar. Not a fan of black finishes but it does check a lot of boxes.
    Now, my question is this: how is it possible that this other Ibanez AM2000 guitar retails for 4 times the price of the AMH90?

    OK, wood choices, tuners, electronics, immaculate craftsmanship, MIJ, I get it.
    But 4 times? Does it play 4 times better?
    MIJ makes it necessary. It does create a situation of diminishing returns but it also creates a greater certainty of quality. How much that is worth in absolute dollars depends on the buyer and for some, the role the guitar is expected to fill.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by eblydian View Post
    I really like this guitar. Not a fan of black finishes but it does check a lot of boxes.
    Now, my question is this: how is it possible that this other Ibanez AM2000 guitar retails for 4 times the price of the AMH90?

    OK, wood choices, tuners, electronics, immaculate craftsmanship, MIJ, I get it.
    But 4 times? Does it play 4 times better?

    It doesn't have to play 4 times better .. to me it's worth it if it just plays twice as good and I suspect it does

    That is life in all things sold .. a $20 bottle of wine is not four times as good as a $5 bottle, but there is no doubt that it is a good deal better.

  30. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    Do you remember what the model designation was of that D'Angelico? I tried one at a store a few years ago and liked it.
    EX SS
    15" thinline full hollow with a maple block beneath the bridge coupling the vibration to the back.
    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-screen-shot-2021-03-30-7-03-48-pm-pngHas anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-screen-shot-2021-03-30-7-03-17-pm-pngHas anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-screen-shot-2021-03-30-7-02-50-pm-png
    The last photo shows the bridge block on the right side, coupling block to the left glued to the back which is a maple laminate. Blocks look to be maple.
    A really nice guitar, same width as a George Benson, resonant and quite solidly resistant to feedback.
    They don't make them any more though, I'm pretty sure.

  31. #30

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    d'angelico excel ss was designed by bill comins....look at his imported line! he tweaks every guitar himself before sending them out...


    cheers

  32. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    d'angelico excel ss was designed by bill comins....look at his imported line! he tweaks every guitar himself before sending them out...


    cheers
    I didn't know that! That's pretty cool.
    I know they come equipped with Kent Armstrong pickups. I sold one and the customer wanted Duncan pickups. I think a Seth Lover and maybe a JB or something. So I switched them out for him. That guitar, which I really liked out of the box, became a really high end seriously inspiring instrument.
    Yeah, they were nice

  33. #32

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    I knew I shouldn't have come here in the first place... now after 10min of research I'm sold on this guitar...

    Was waiting for an Eastman Romeo LA as what another reply says, but this one checks all the boxes I have here: hollow, thinline, light weight < 5.5 lbs, small size body, and <$1.5k. I also think basswood is cool. Plus it's only half of the price of a Romeo LA!!!

  34. #33

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    Yea I'm sold on this one too! But I checked the prices in China is like more than $1000! Shite.

  35. #34

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    Alright, just had mine delivered today.

    It's heavier and bigger than what I thought. Weighs exactly at 6 lbs. Some of the higher frets could be dressed better. The factory set-up isn't very good (>2.5mm at the 12th) And one of the tritone positions didn't work out of the box.

    Now... aside from those there's truly nothing else I can complain about. Straight neck, overall build quality is good (except for those couple of frets), intonation and actions are good once set up to my preference. I pulled the switch out and the tritone thing is magically fixed...

    As of the sound, for a laminated guitar there's nothing much to say on the unplugged sound. And I don't really have anything to do a head to head comparison. It has a scooped mid or a "flat" sound comparing to my ER2 or a Carvin SH645 I had a while ago. But the harmonic richness is still there I feel.

    Plugged in, this is where I think the super 58s shine. Pretty good clarity and has an "airy" sound. And yes it can handle overdrive blues sounds very well. Tritone can also be quite useful to dial in more sounds.

    I was actually thinking of whether I should return it, as it will definitely not going to be my #1. Also 6 lbs is the upper limit for me these days. But.. heck it's less than $600 with a regular 15% off discount... And it does scratch the itch to have a thinline hollowbody to do both jazz and blues. So guess I will keep it and if it gets enough love in the future I will refret it with ss frets and call it done.

    Btw, yes it's hollow, with a block under the bridge and another one at the tail, and some braces in between.

  36. #35

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    6 lbs is light!

  37. #36

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    I'm spoiled by Eastman

  38. #37

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    Does it have neck dive btw?

  39. #38

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    Yes, a little bit. But better than my ER2. With a cotton strap it's not a big deal to me.

  40. #39

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    Is it gig worthy you think? It's not gonna fall apart on you, I mean some of the cheap guitars have that feeling?

  41. #40

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    absolutely!

    aside from a few minor issues it's really very well built. since I only had it for less than a day, can't say it's built like a tank, but seems the neck is pretty stable. And the tuners are fine. I played some blues with a lots of bendings and it stayed in tune. Likely I will put on 11-50s in the weekends and will know more on how the neck reacts.

    It doesn't give me that "cheap" feeling. Oh, did I say the knobs are ebony?

  42. #41

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    The wood dust on the fingerboard was quite bothering... so I had to clean it up this morning and also put on a new set of strings.

    Again, very stable neck and to my surprise the basswood is somewhat resistance to dents. I accidentally let the tailpiece fell onto the body, and was expecting some dents, but nothing... For another basswood body guitar I have, literally I can dent it with just my fingernails.

    With 11-50s it plays quite nice. Unplugged it sounds fuller. I think it makes a good basis to do further mods.

    This is how the neck looks like with strings off - still pretty straight with no obvious back bow
    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-pxl_20210406-png

    The inside of the hollowbody
    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-pxl_202104062-png

  43. #42

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    So I just picked one of these up, and it seems to have a major design or build flaw -- even with the bridge all the way down and the neck perfectly straight, the action is basically at 6/64" on the 12th fret low E string, which is unacceptable for me. It seems to be a neck angle issue.

    jjk140: how low are you able to get the action on yours? Unless I can get it resolved it will have to go back; I have a hard time believing the guitar was designed this way, so perhaps I just got a bum one?

    Quote Originally Posted by jjk1407
    The wood dust on the fingerboard was quite bothering... so I had to clean it up this morning and also put on a new set of strings.

    Again, very stable neck and to my surprise the basswood is somewhat resistance to dents. I accidentally let the tailpiece fell onto the body, and was expecting some dents, but nothing... For another basswood body guitar I have, literally I can dent it with just my fingernails.

    With 11-50s it plays quite nice. Unplugged it sounds fuller. I think it makes a good basis to do further mods.

    This is how the neck looks like with strings off - still pretty straight with no obvious back bow
    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-pxl_20210406-png

    The inside of the hollowbody
    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-pxl_202104062-png

  44. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by steinny
    So I just picked one of these up, and it seems to have a major design or build flaw -- even with the bridge all the way down and the neck perfectly straight, the action is basically at 6/64" on the 12th fret low E string, which is unacceptable for me. It seems to be a neck angle issue.
    Send it back. With the bridge on the deck, you should have the strings on the frets. That's just wrong. It needs to be lower to compensate for any pull up, seasonal change or string choice.
    Sorry to hear this. Where was that guitar made?

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Send it back. With the bridge on the deck, you should have the strings on the frets. That's just wrong. It needs to be lower to compensate for any pull up, seasonal change or string choice.
    Sorry to hear this. Where was that guitar made?
    They'll all made in Indonesia. It is weird how off the neck angle seems to be -- hard to believe it's a design flaw, but I've never heard of a mass-produced guitar having that sort of an issue (I assume it's all CNC, how could they get the build wrong on this one)?

  46. #45

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    Mine is set to 1.9mm on low E, my own preference. Sounds like you got a defective one... I'd send it back.

  47. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by steinny
    They'll all made in Indonesia.
    Ah, that makes sense. When I worked at Ibanez I dreaded the QC checks on guitars that came from some Indonesian factories. The wood they used... well let's just say it looked like a duck, it quacked like a duck but they didn't always fly. Sorry to hear about that. Yeah send it back, and keep doing it 'til you get one that was cut from a good tree and put together right.
    Good luck

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by steinny
    They'll all made in Indonesia. It is weird how off the neck angle seems to be -- hard to believe it's a design flaw, but I've never heard of a mass-produced guitar having that sort of an issue (I assume it's all CNC, how could they get the build wrong on this one)?
    By using a piece of under seasoned wood that moves after the fact.

  49. #48

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    AMH90 looks like a nice guitar.
    I already have 2 thinline hollow bodies (albeit both have a small brace under the bridge) - Epiphone Johnny A and Godin Montreal Premiere but the Ibanez would scratch that itch.

  50. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    By using a piece of under seasoned wood that moves after the fact.
    Bingo. We'd have "budget" models of high end models like the RG, made in Indonesia. They looked and spec'd out like their $1200 brothers and of course they sold like crazy for those who can't get the real Rolex watch. But little things like pickup ring screws that would strip out before they were snug, sawdust where bridge posts were anchored, and bodies that were uncannily light, all bespoke a wood just above balsa wood. They have a lot of those jungle woods in Indonesia and the factories use them liberally.
    They're built with a wood that weighs in pretty solidly, and by the time they sat in the warehouse, got shipped, inspected and shelved before distribution to the retailer, they've lost a lot of water. Ever see a sponge change shape when it dries out? Think of a guitar losing tropical water mass, add a hundred pounds of string pull and ... hey this potato chip was nice and flat before...

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by steinny View Post
    So I just picked one of these up, and it seems to have a major design or build flaw -- even with the bridge all the way down and the neck perfectly straight, the action is basically at 6/64" on the 12th fret low E string, which is unacceptable for me. It seems to be a neck angle issue.
    jjk140: how low are you able to get the action on yours? Unless I can get it resolved it will have to go back; I have a hard time believing the guitar was designed this way, so perhaps I just got a bum one?
    mine arrived last week, its action on the high / too high side, too. and, on mine too, lowering the bridge all the way to the top didn't change it substantially, and my neck seemed straight, too... maybe i was shipped the very one you returned? :-) i'm just joking – mine came from Thomann, and was indeed still factory wrapped, but seemingly with the same issue as yours.

    i had planned to replace all gold-plated hardware with black-plated one anyway, and had planned to replace the pickups anyway, too, so i took it all apart on day one, and have little by little completed the "conversion" in the last days – to my full satisfaction, finally.

    to start with, mine was shipped with the trussrod entirely unloaded, like... it took three full turns before it even had any purchase on the neck.
    this was easy, and it brought the action into manageable ball-park – and the (black-plated) bridge i chose has its own (black-plated) inserts, which have a thinner upper lip to sit on the top, about 1mm lower, and the bridge itself is about 1mm lower... seeing how i've had to raise both thumbwheels for about 2.5mm, i can only guess that setting the trussrod to effective tension has put neck and fretboard on their respective right course, in the end.

    fret edges of mine, on both sides of the 'board, fell victim to lunch break, if ever craftspeople at the Indonesian plant even have a break during their shift, let alone lunch...
    not one of them, not one, had been crowned and rounded, despite the whole 'board being surrounded by a perfectly polished (and glass-like smooth) faux-ivory binding – just a tad shy of razor barbwire, they were, and i spent the best of an afternoon to crown them soft and round, then polishing them mirror-like with abrasive rubber-erasers and a final beauty massage with Gorgomyte.

    with the whole electronics replaced, and the new hardware in place... i replaced the only other original bit left on the strings' path, which was originally cut with utmost care – the plastic nut... some exact piece that was installed on my most recent AG95, except this one was made right (and that of the AG95 totally wrong) – now it has a zero fret like all other guitars i have around here, just a habit of mine i'm so keen to keep alive.

    took me a couple of minutes to assess why this is more neck-heavy than the AG95... scale is the same, body shape is the same, only the depth isn't, and then the weight isn't, either – but the AMH90 neck is set at 18th fret into the body, while the AG95 is set it at the 14th, hence pushing the strap hanging point in line with your shoulder some extra 3-4 centimeters on a neck "out-there", with a less favourable lever of balance (to the player)... couple this to a flat/satin finish, over a body significantly lower in weight... and choose a leather strap with unlined backside, so that the neck-heavy feeling is completely countered!

    i also changed the looky-looking dot markers on the fretboard: they were a lovely shade of green abalone, indeed classy, but they lacked enough contrast over the ebony hue to be spotted in a low light setting at first glance, to my eye at least. they now have a fake mother-of-pearl sticker thing in place, looking more silver-ish, not half as classy but four times more visible – which suits my tired sight way better.

    of course, before you ask, was this worth the exercise?

    had all of these adjustments have to be billed by a skilled luthier, no, definitely not – the price premium on the upper-range AM2000 model would have simply disappeared, no question – and since in my project the guitar was sort of a workbench in its "factory state", i saw no sense in claiming the 30-days money-back guarantee that Thomann kindly honored before without even flinching, my project involved time and labour anyway, and i can only admit i enjoy the task.

    do i like the final result, then?

    yes - in a certain way: it's a comfy, neatly engineered, feather-light guitar, and pretty resonant, and responsive, even more so in light of its diminished body depth.
    my only reservation to it, is it doesn't seem to take the higher tension of .012-.052 strings too well, as it becomes kind of too stiff, too taut with them – so i've resolved to installing .011-.049s on it.

    out of personal experience, it's not the first time that i see this happening, and it does not surprise me – it's just a fact that i've yet to find a way to predict before an actual purchase with full restring.

    just as example: my most recent AG95 has the same "physical" specs, came with the very same factory-installed strings as this AMH90, but takes .012-.052 strings without feeling choked by them, and will then have .012-.052 on it for life, while i doubt my AMH90 ever will (unless i want to keep wrapping new .012-.052 strings on it, and decide they respond more like climbing rope than harmonic strings the very moment i've tuned them to pitch, just a second before discarding them again, which i just can't afford once more).

    again, as a difference with my AG95, the length of string behind the bridge with the standard trapeze-shaped tailpiece is much lower on the AG95 than it is on the AMH90.
    i've installed a shorter trapeze on the former, and bought a short one for the latter anyway... but in the end i doubt the trouble of a short trapeze (with more wobbly dissonance for the increased string length behind the bridge) is worth the effort, in light of maybe only a 1" difference in the end...

    as last note to curious readers here, over a matter you can only assess when removing the pickups: it's hollow, yes, as there is no center-block running along its whole body length indeed – but a block there is, nonetheless, joining top and bottom, about 1" in width, onto which the bridge thimbles are press-fit. even with it inside, it's a good 250g lighter than the (block-less) AG95, which at about 2.5kg is by all means still a lot lighter the 1989 Gibson ES-175D, and the 1999 Ibanez PM20 i had until a recent while.

    Has anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-img_3257-pngHas anyone seen the new Ibanez AMH 90 yet?-img_3258-png
    (ps: new bone nut pictured at its original factory size, before i trimmed its edges – abalone dot markers on fretboard pictured before they were replaced by stick-on faux-pearl ones)
    Last edited by rbbrnck; 04-26-2021 at 09:02 AM. Reason: (forgot to add picts)