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  1. #1

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    New amp from Quilter
    Aviator CUB 50w combo with 3 Fender voicings, Tweed/Blond and Blackace. With Reverb, line out and headphone out

    Looks pretty cool, and simple.

    A little less than 600€, made in China, might explain the steep price.

    I'm interested.

    It's already available in Europe (Thomann Germany)

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510

    New amp from Quilter
    Aviator CUB 50w combo with 3 Fender voicings, Tweed/Blond and Blackace. With Reverb, line out and headphone out

    Looks pretty cool, and simple.

    A little less than 600€, made in China, might explain the steep price.

    I'm interested.

    It's already available in Europe (Thomann Germany)
    WHY did you have to show me this? JayLeonardJ’s demo was the reason I bought the Quilter Interblock 45. If I watch this again I might end up spending money I am not ready to spend yet! ? ?

    I might have to get one next year, because my fun money this year is already budgeted for my guitar build and 4Runner off-roading upgrades.

  4. #3

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    So for me I love Quilter amps. My only issue is I wish it had more wattage akin to the Aviator amp.
    I say this for live gigging situations, especially outdoors. I used to have the 101 and it was a bit weak.

    Great concept!

  5. #4

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    Sounds like they will be adding more new Aviator amps and this is just the first.

    One thing that seems odd is how they are handling the voicing: separate tweed/blonde/black input jacks rather than a switch. And I don't see any jack in the back for a footswitch to change voicings or reverb.

  6. #5

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    How does that speaker volume work? Is it a master volume?

  7. #6

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    Kudos to Quilter for launching a reasonably-sized and innovative combo into a standstill market! Now that they have nailed down the voicings, may we expect to see them featured in other future Quilters as well? For the sake of jazz guitarists - a minority - I hope there's enough clean headroom, especially in the Tweed mode.

  8. #7

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    What little I listened on my laptop it sounded horrible or was it the guy with a guitar. About 45 seconds was more than enough for me

  9. #8

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    I tried it today and have to admit I liked it, and it had a lot of headroom for the 50 watt rating.
    I also was impressed with Boss Nextone Special 80 watts, 2 channels, etc
    Very impressed with both channels!

  10. #9

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    On the YouTube comments, a guy asks about the 50w, enough for live situation?
    Peter Quilter answers that they are equivalent to 50w of a tube amp.
    I can't help but being a bit skeptical about that affirmation..
    But anyway 50w tube power is way too much for me, so even if it's more like a 20w tube amp I'd be happy with that.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    On the YouTube comments, a guy asks about the 50w, enough for live situation?
    Peter Quilter answers that they are equivalent to 50w of a tube amp.
    I can't help but being a bit skeptical about that affirmation..
    But anyway 50w tube power is way too much for me, so even if it's more like a 20w tube amp I'd be happy with that.
    It’s a question of how it’s measured and the interaction with an output transformer in tube amps that make ‘tube watts’ seem louder than ‘solid state watts’, although most solid state manufacturers nowadays use current feedback circuits to emulate a tube amp’s behaviour and then a solid state amp’s watts are as loud as a tube amp’s!
    Last edited by Little Jay; 03-10-2021 at 11:43 AM.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BFrench
    What little I listened on my laptop it sounded horrible or was it the guy with a guitar. About 45 seconds was more than enough for me
    The video didn’t do it for me either... plingy-plingy raspy sounds that didn’t tickle my jazz boxes at all.... might be different with a decent archtop though?

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    New amp from Quilter
    Aviator CUB 50w combo with 3 Fender voicings, Tweed/Blond and Blackace. With Reverb, line out and headphone out
    A little less than 600€, made in China, might explain the steep price.
    It's already available in Europe (Thomann Germany)
    Thomann's website says "Made in USA".

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy In Lyon
    Thomann's website says "Made in USA".
    I think none of the Quilter's are "Made in USA". They are "Assembled in USA".
    That's what it says on my Quilter micropro mach 2. I'm sure they would have loved to put "Made in USA" if they could legally get away with it. Probably the circuit is made in China.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 03-11-2021 at 08:52 AM.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    On the YouTube comments, a guy asks about the 50w, enough for live situation?
    Peter Quilter answers that they are equivalent to 50w of a tube amp.
    I can't help but being a bit skeptical about that affirmation..
    But anyway 50w tube power is way too much for me, so even if it's more like a 20w tube amp I'd be happy with that.
    Volume knob. I find while some tube amps don't sound as good at low volume (there are exceptions), SS amps do better. When it comes to SS watts, you can't have too much.
    Last edited by BigDaddyLoveHandles; 03-10-2021 at 04:30 PM.

  16. #15

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    I watched carefully the pictures on Thomann. On the back of the Aviator CUB is clearly written made in China, whereas on the Mach Pro, made in the USA.
    It's not that it's such a big deal, but I was kind of.. upset. If I'm honest with my first feeling

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    I watched carefully the pictures on Thomann. On the back of the Aviator CUB is clearly written made in China, whereas on the Mach Pro, made in the USA.
    It's not that it's such a big deal, but I was kind of.. upset. If I'm honest with my first feeling
    You can check the pictures in the actual Quilter Labs website. Quilters are not made in USA. That seems to be an internet myth. Maybe they used to make them in the USA. They are now either "Designed in the USA" or "Assembled in the USA".
    https://www.quilterlabs.com/images/q...ower-cable.jpg

    The Quilter MicroPro Mach 2 Series Quilter Labs

  18. #17

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    Hey! I haven't been on this forum for a while but I am stopping by to answer the questions in this thread.

    Wattage ratings - The Aviator Cub is setup for 50 watts of tube like output but internally uses a 120 watt power amp. It's essentially the same power amp as our 101 series. We use that remaining 70 watts for the high voltage spike that you get in tube amps. Aside from our 45 series, you can think of our watts like tube watts.

    Speaker Volume - Just like a Master Volume.

    USA or China? - The Aviator Cub is made in China. Eminence makes the speaker and the cabinet. The electronics are made/assembled by another reputable supplier that makes other amps for us as well as stuff for QSC.

    "Made In" vs "Assembled In" - This gets a little complicated but the short of it is that there are not really too many electronic component manufacturers left in the USA, especially surface mount, so some of the electronic components are globally sourced. Anything that says Assembled in the USA on it has the electronics stuffed and tested at QSC in Costa Mesa California. The cabinets are made in Buena Park California. We assemble the electronics, speakers, and cabinets together in house. (Also in Costa Mesa California) For something to say "Made In the USA" instead of "Assembled in the USA" you have to have essentially 100% of all components sourced in the USA.

    Hope that helps!

  19. #18

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    Thanks very much. Very instructive information

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    On the YouTube comments, a guy asks about the 50w, enough for live situation?
    Peter Quilter answers that they are equivalent to 50w of a tube amp.
    I can't help but being a bit skeptical about that affirmation..
    I think you mean either Peter Melton, or Pat Quilter. They are two different people. Just clarifying.

  21. #20

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    I'd love to try one.
    Would be interested to see how it compares to the Tonemaster Deluxe Reverb.
    Re the country of origin... my Aviator Twin Ten is made in USA - it says on the amp!
    I'm sure many of the components internally are from the far east.

  22. #21

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    Re: Made in USA: a few years ago, California passed a law that companies could only put “Made in USA” on the product if essentially every single component was manufactured in the United States. So now the American series Fender Strats and Teles like American Ultra and American Professional no longer say Made in USA. Now they say Corona, California. Why? Because things like the machine heads are made overseas.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fusionshred
    Re: Made in USA: a few years ago, California passed a law that companies could only put “Made in USA” on the product if essentially every single component was manufactured in the United States. So now the American series Fender Strats and Teles like American Ultra and American Professional no longer say Made in USA. Now they say Corona, California. Why? Because things like the machine heads are made overseas.
    That seems fair enough to me. What would the alternative be -- "Made in USA" means > 50% american parts? And by what metric? Count, cost, weight, volume? If Fender want to emphasize how "american" their MIA is, they could list major components by country of origin.

    As for machine heads, aren't Sperzels american? But would anyone object to Schallers (Germany)? (And if I recall Grover=China and Gotoh=Japan)

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    That seems fair enough to me. What would the alternative be -- "Made in USA" means > 50% american parts? And by what metric? Count, cost, weight, volume? If Fender want to emphasize how "american" their MIA is, they could list major components by country of origin.

    As for machine heads, aren't Sperzels american? But would anyone object to Schallers (Germany)? (And if I recall Grover=China and Gotoh=Japan)
    I think parts are a small part of the cost. If the assembly, setup, testing, QA etc are done in the US, the labour and real estate costs would be much higher than the parts. For example if 90% of the cost of a product is incurred in the US, but parts were outsourced (only 10% of the cost), technically it still is not "Made in the USA". If this is the case for companies like Quilter, I think that's unreasonable.

  25. #24

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    Like it or not, the world is globalized. With so much input coming from Far East, the Made in... statement is more emotional than rational. IMHO, where a thing is put together is where it's made, no matter how much of the value added is imported. Right? My speaker cabs are good example. The speaker, whether from Italy, UK, USA or China, accounts for up to 70% of the materials cost. Many other components (handles, jacks) come from abroad. The domestic costs are from my subcontractors, rent and other overhead, plus whatever I can afford to pay myself (so far none). Selling price is less than twice the cost. A Lutheran-Californian interpretation means these, and many other products, are Made in Nowhere, which isn't a particularly good selling point.

  26. #25

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    I watched a bit of the video below. They put the Quilter head to head with a vintage tweed Fender. I thought the lower gain stuff was very close. The higher gain settings not so convincing, but I bet the EQ could be tweaked to match better. You also have to account for differences in cab, speaker, etc.—each component is critical to the sound you actually hear.