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  1. #1

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    Hi,

    My guitar has had a neck reset in the past, a very solid and good job. However recently I noticed a little daylight in the join, cause for major concern?

    Neck separation?-img-20210125-wa0006-jpg

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  3. #2

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    yes...once the joint is compromised, it's only going to get worse under string tension

    hard to see how serious it is from that pic, but i'd have it looked at by a good tech


    cheers

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    yes...once the joint is compromised, it's only going to get worse under string tension

    hard to see how serious it is from that pic, but i'd have it looked at by a good tech


    cheers
    Would it have to be a complete reset or can it be stopped in its tracks?

  5. #4

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    that's just it...you might be able to stop it in it's tracks if you act quickly..but if you wait, the potential for more serious problems increase...strings put a lot of pounds of tension on the neck/body joint

    might be a good idea to tune strings down till you can get it looked at

    luck


    cheers

  6. #5
    Thanks for the tip. I just tuned it down and hopefully major surgery isn't required.

    Here are some more pics, it's tricky to capture.

    Neck separation?-img_20210125_235155-jpgNeck separation?-img_20210125_234941-jpgNeck separation?-img_20210125_234951-jpg

  7. #6
    First photo I was going to say it could very well be fine, it's not easy to get a tight pristine surface after a neck reset. I was going to be optimistic and recommend a luthier's close scrutiny. But after the other photos, I say please let the tension off and have it looked at ASAP. I don't have a good feeling about it.
    Did you notice a change in the action or playability recently? Was the instrument maybe a tad less easy than it was?
    It's hard to tell from photos, and there's enough danger of progressive separation that a close inspection and flexing is warranted.
    IMHO

  8. #7

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    Yup, not good.

  9. #8
    No, playability wise it is the same. I can't be sure when this developed, it just so happened I had it on my lap this evening and the light caught my eye through the gap.

  10. #9

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    Couldn't tell from the first picture you posted but the second batch show a clear failure i.e. when you can see light through the joint. You need to take that to a reliable repair person. In my opinion, one should remove the neck, clean out the old glue and square up the neck to body joint and re-glue with the correct neck to body angle.

  11. #10

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    NOT good!

  12. #11

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    There's daylight in the second photo. Destring and bring to a QUALIFIED luthier. I'd bet a new pair of Sunday pants it's a complete reset. I had my ES125 neck reset in the 90's. Still fine today. Play live . . . Marinero

  13. #12
    Don't suppose anyone knows a ballpark figure on a reset these days? Is it easier as there already been a reset? I think the finish usually covers the joint on an ES 175, right? So hopefully that means less work for the luthier.

  14. #13

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    if you are stateside, contact curt wilson @ old school guitars in nj...he's a member here..and one of the best out there with bodywork and refinishing

    https://www.oldschoolguitar.net/contact/

    check his projects pages!! incredible work!

    cheers

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by acidskiffle
    Don't suppose anyone knows a ballpark figure on a reset these days? Is it easier as there already been a reset? I think the finish usually covers the joint on an ES 175, right? So hopefully that means less work for the luthier.
    Figures can run the gamut. Depends a lot on the job that's being re-worked. Seriously, some glues are reversable, but I've been shown repairs that have been done with glues that have made the second time around problematic.
    I know it's not helpful but if the reset involved removal of material, and that's at the core of your present problem then it could be more work than if the luthier had gotten there first time. On the other hand, it might be that a simple glue seal has come loose because the old glue surfaces weren't cleaned enough. The luthier who did the job originally, ask them for a ballpark. Better yet, get the best you can and ask them what it'll cost. I hate it when people come to me and say "So and So said it should only cost $17.50)"
    It's far from standardized. For instance, I would have refinished the join area, but I've worked with techs who would have left as you received it.

  16. #15

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    yes, that's a bad situation. It needs a reset.

  17. #16

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    Hi, A,
    When I had my neck reset, they resprayed the joint and it looked original. Don't take it to your local hobbyist. Only a qualified luthier should do this repair or you'll be back again in short time. Play live . . . Marinero

  18. #17

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    Might not be a bad situation as such. First question is if this was something you just happen to notice or did it all of a sudden get this way? Next question is do you feel any movement at all in the neck either forward or backward, side to side? Some. times binding can shrink and reveal a gap as this does but it may always have been there since the first neck reset. Not that that, is necessarily good but it can also mean the neck has not moved at all.

    The best things is a gap is already should neck need to be completely reset ( possibly not), because it will be easier to remove the neck with less trauma. The hardest part of this process is getting the neck off for sure. The best part about this is you have an archtop guitar so setting the neck is easier to me that a flattop guitar. A flattop guitar since you have no adjustable bridge requires much more precision measurements. You have bit more leeway with an archtop guitar.

    The bad news is the cost a lot of money to do and is one of the more expensive repairs even without much finish work to be done. Don't know about other repair folks but this starts at $600 and goes up.

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Might not be a bad situation as such. First question is if this was something you just happen to notice or did it all of a sudden get this way? Next question is do you feel any movement at all in the neck either forward or backward, side to side? Some. times binding can shrink and reveal a gap as this does but it may always have been there since the first neck reset. Not that that, is necessarily good but it can also mean the neck has not moved at all.

    The best things is a gap is already should neck need to be completely reset ( possibly not), because it will be easier to remove the neck with less trauma. The hardest part of this process is getting the neck off for sure. The best part about this is you have an archtop guitar so setting the neck is easier to me that a flattop guitar. A flattop guitar since you have no adjustable bridge requires much more precision measurements. You have bit more leeway with an archtop guitar.

    The bad news is the cost a lot of money to do and is one of the more expensive repairs even without much finish work to be done. Don't know about other repair folks but this starts at $600 and goes up.
    I just happened to notice, there was nothing in the playability that prompted me to go look around the neck join. Just by chance a little bit of light caught my eye while I had it upright on my lap showing it to someone. I looked over the join before, but never held a light against it, so I can't be certain how long it has been there.

    I haven't pushed particularly hard, because I'm afraid to But I couldn't get the gap to close any by putting a bit of force on it, the join still feels very solid. Action is still ok etc

  20. #19

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    I almost believe it has been this way a long time. Frankly it could have happened right after the neck set or was set that way.

    if the action on the guitar has not changed or the playability over time it is stable. You can take strings off or slack and see if joint moves at all. You are not going to do any damage to the guitar. It either moves a bit or it doesn’t. If it does just means no question it needs attention.

    In any case a luthier needs to give it a going over. Where do you live we can suggest.

  21. #20

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    Git 'er done, son.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    I almost believe it has been this way a long time. Frankly it could have happened right after the neck set or was set that way.

    if the action on the guitar has not changed or the playability over time it is stable. You can take strings off or slack and see if joint moves at all. You are not going to do any damage to the guitar. It either moves a bit or it doesn’t. If it does just means no question it needs attention.

    In any case a luthier needs to give it a going over. Where do you live we can suggest.
    So I've compared with strings tightened and loosened and it's the exact same. Gave it a hefty push and no movement. I'm in Ireland, there's an excellent luthier here that can take a look regardless. Thanks for the info!