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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet
    ...one of those guild american patriarch aristocrats. man, i wanted one of those.
    I‘ve recently bought an M-75 Goldtop.
    If you can live without Nitrolacquer and maybe do some subtle mods you‘ll get an equal substitute. They‘re built flawless, same woods, same pickups. Fantastic guitars.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    I'm with feet. This doesn't make me want a collings, it makes me want a 50s Gretsch.
    Exactly the way I feel. I'd want a 6196 in Cadillac Green.

  4. #53

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    Collings guitars are unreal, just as Stout said. The factory setup is the best you will ever see and the neck shapes are perfect. They are also researched/engineered very precisely to achieve the sonic qualities they want out of their instruments. The I-30 LC is a great example: hollow body like a Gibson 330 but with trestle bracing to give it more sustain and feedback resistance. It's nice to see builders who continually put research into improving on the design of guitars. It raises the whole level of guitar building. On top of that, QA at Collings is great, so those meticulously engineered designs are actually fulfilled in production (unlike a certain brand that we all know and love but obviously peaked in the 50s).

    That said, a Collings guitar really sounds and feels like a new guitar. This is the primary reason I would rather get a vintage Duojet rather than the Collings version. The vintage duojets sell for about the same as this new model, so it's not outrageous. If we were talking about a 59 ES-335 ($40k+) it would be different. But my point is that I think "mojo" is a real thing - not in a spiritual or metaphysical sense, but vintage guitars have a categorically distinct quality that lacks in modern guitars, with some exceptions. The two exceptions I can think of from experience are Slaman and Nacho. I don't know how they achieve it but both builders manage to reproduce the feel of a vintage guitar. Collings has an "aged finish" option. It's cool but doesn't feel anything like an old guitar.

    Btw since nacho has come up I thought I'd add I played one and holy shit it was awesome. I think it weighed something like 6 lbs total. I was blown away by it before hitting a single note. I don't know how to describe the experience of playing other than "inspiring". There is something very special about them. Julian Lage has said in interviews that he actually prefers it to his blackguard and I totally get it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff
    I‘ve recently bought an M-75 Goldtop.
    If you can live without Nitrolacquer and maybe do some subtle mods you‘ll get an equal substitute. They‘re built flawless, same woods, same pickups. Fantastic guitars.
    Given your preference for Nacho and Collings I'm surprised you could live without nitro on that Guild!

    It's funny this comes up because the Guild M-75 is the guitar that always comes to my mind when people talk about chambered or "trestle block", whatever that means, construction. I feel like everything you could say about a duojet's or this Lage model's acoustic properties is even more true of the M-75. Any time I think wow I need a duo jet (which is rare but more common than I would expect), the M-75 instantly comes to mind. Other ones I think of are obviously Yanuziello and Grez. I think Grez are some of the most undervalued modern guitars out there given their design and unreal acoustic resonance.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Collings guitars are unreal, just as Stout said. The factory setup is the best you will ever see and the neck shapes are perfect. They are also researched/engineered very precisely to achieve the sonic qualities they want out of their instruments. The I-30 LC is a great example: hollow body like a Gibson 330 but with trestle bracing to give it more sustain and feedback resistance. It's nice to see builders who continually put research into improving on the design of guitars. It raises the whole level of guitar building. On top of that, QA at Collings is great, so those meticulously engineered designs are actually fulfilled in production (unlike a certain brand that we all know and love but obviously peaked in the 50s).

    That said, a Collings guitar really sounds and feels like a new guitar. This is the primary reason I would rather get a vintage Duojet rather than the Collings version. The vintage duojets sell for about the same as this new model, so it's not outrageous. If we were talking about a 59 ES-335 ($40k+) it would be different. But my point is that I think "mojo" is a real thing - not in a spiritual or metaphysical sense, but vintage guitars have a categorically distinct quality that lacks in modern guitars, with some exceptions. The two exceptions I can think of from experience are Slaman and Nacho. I don't know how they achieve it but both builders manage to reproduce the feel of a vintage guitar. Collings has an "aged finish" option. It's cool but doesn't feel anything like an old guitar.

    Btw since nacho has come up I thought I'd add I played one and holy shit it was awesome. I think it weighed something like 6 lbs total. I was blown away by it before hitting a single note. I don't know how to describe the experience of playing other than "inspiring". There is something very special about them. Julian Lage has said in interviews that he actually prefers it to his blackguard and I totally get it.



    Given your preference for Nacho and Collings I'm surprised you could live without nitro on that Guild!

    It's funny this comes up because the Guild M-75 is the guitar that always comes to my mind when people talk about chambered or "trestle block", whatever that means, construction. I feel like everything you could say about a duojet's or this Lage model's acoustic properties is even more true of the M-75. Any time I think wow I need a duo jet (which is rare but more common than I would expect), the M-75 instantly comes to mind. Other ones I think of are obviously Yanuziello and Grez. I think Grez are some of the most undervalued modern guitars out there given their design and unreal acoustic resonance.
    Hehe!
    One important detail on the korean Newark St. Guilds: they‘re really thin coated. No comparison to (proline) Gretsches. I‘m a sucker for weight, lacquer and even small details on instruments but those guitars are really cool.
    Julian Lage's new Collings (Gretsch Duo Jet copy)-cec45292-83af-42d5-8b9d-0a48c40ee9d9-jpeg
    Flawless built quality and the Franz pickups are amazing. Yes, I can live with no nitro on this guitar. And man, it‘s a gold sparkle top!
    But I‘m with you, Nitro is always first choice and yup, Grez are great guitars!

  6. #55

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    Nice photo but it doesn't make me want a Newark, it makes me want a 50s Guild.

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Nice photo but it doesn't make me want a Newark, it makes me want a 50s Guild.
    Come over here and play it while we have a beer!

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Collings guitars are unreal, just as Stout said. The factory setup is the best you will ever see and the neck shapes are perfect. They are also researched/engineered very precisely to achieve the sonic qualities they want out of their instruments. The I-30 LC is a great example: hollow body like a Gibson 330 but with trestle bracing to give it more sustain and feedback resistance. It's nice to see builders who continually put research into improving on the design of guitars. It raises the whole level of guitar building. On top of that, QA at Collings is great, so those meticulously engineered designs are actually fulfilled in production (unlike a certain brand that we all know and love but obviously peaked in the 50s).

    That said, a Collings guitar really sounds and feels like a new guitar. This is the primary reason I would rather get a vintage Duojet rather than the Collings version. The vintage duojets sell for about the same as this new model, so it's not outrageous. If we were talking about a 59 ES-335 ($40k+) it would be different. But my point is that I think "mojo" is a real thing - not in a spiritual or metaphysical sense, but vintage guitars have a categorically distinct quality that lacks in modern guitars, with some exceptions. The two exceptions I can think of from experience are Slaman and Nacho. I don't know how they achieve it but both builders manage to reproduce the feel of a vintage guitar. Collings has an "aged finish" option. It's cool but doesn't feel anything like an old guitar.

    Btw since nacho has come up I thought I'd add I played one and holy shit it was awesome. I think it weighed something like 6 lbs total. I was blown away by it before hitting a single note. I don't know how to describe the experience of playing other than "inspiring". There is something very special about them. Julian Lage has said in interviews that he actually prefers it to his blackguard and I totally get it.



    Given your preference for Nacho and Collings I'm surprised you could live without nitro on that Guild!

    It's funny this comes up because the Guild M-75 is the guitar that always comes to my mind when people talk about chambered or "trestle block", whatever that means, construction. I feel like everything you could say about a duojet's or this Lage model's acoustic properties is even more true of the M-75. Any time I think wow I need a duo jet (which is rare but more common than I would expect), the M-75 instantly comes to mind. Other ones I think of are obviously Yanuziello and Grez. I think Grez are some of the most undervalued modern guitars out there given their design and unreal acoustic resonance.
    I've never heard of Nacho but I have a Collings and a Slaman (and Trenier, plus other stuff, not to mention the Buscarino, Andersens and others that have passed through my hands...). Collings are as good as it gets. It's just taste and other things that separate the very best guitars, but Collings are in that upper echelon. And in terms of build quality, which is more objective, nothing is better than Collings (disclaimer: have never seen a Monteleone in person...) although there are a few builders who supernaturally seem to be able to hit the same level of perfection.

    Note that Collings has both their standard "50's" neck shape and their more rare "60's" neck shape. I had the 50's on mine reshaped to a 60's, which IMO is closer to what you find on most modern jazz guitars.

    As for mojo, it's true that Collings are super squeaky clean and a bit sterile when you first get them, but just play the heck out of it for a year and it will feel much better. I got mine in early 2018 and it's now got some dings, sweat, saliva, etc. plus the white binding has darkened a little bit, the finish is not as glossy, etc.

  9. #58

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    One more promotional vid from Julian posted an hour age


  10. #59

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    Very nice and of course superb playing. I love that crunchy attack of the Ellis pkups and that well balanced volume on all strings. Sounds not like a Duo Jet since it isn‘t a Duo Jet (copy)

  11. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff
    Very nice and of course superb playing. I love that crunchy attack of the Ellis pkups and that well balanced volume on all strings. Sounds not like a Duo Jet since it isn‘t a Duo Jet (copy)
    LOL

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    LOL
    I‘m happy to entertain you...
    It's great for Gretsch to have such loyal fans like you, anyway.

    This guitar is obviously a Jet inspired instrument but it‘s nevertheless something different and not just a copy. It looks different, it‘s got different details* and it sounds different. That doesn't mean better or worse. And I love Gretsches, especially Duo Jets, but honestly and also obviously Collings is a different league (talking about Gretsch Proline).

    *Collings differentiates between semi-hollow and full hollow.
    The 470JL is listed as Full Hollow.

  13. #62

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    ^ ridiculous!! that's like saying the collings i-35 is not based on the gibby 335!



    plus lage was playing a real gretsch duo jet just prior!! so there was intent!

    gretsch rules! hah


    cheers

  14. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff
    I‘m happy to entertain you...
    It's great for Gretsch to have such loyal fans like you, anyway.

    This guitar is obviously a Jet inspired instrument but it‘s nevertheless something different and not just a copy. It looks different, it‘s got different details* and it sounds different. That doesn't mean better or worse. And I love Gretsches, especially Duo Jets, but honestly and also obviously Collings is a different league (talking about Gretsch Proline).

    *Collings differentiates between semi-hollow and full hollow.
    The 470JL is listed as Full Hollow.
    Julian Lage's new Collings (Gretsch Duo Jet copy)-png

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    Julian Lage's new Collings (Gretsch Duo Jet copy)-png
    @ruger9, that‘s really all?

  16. #65

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    Got that Email today from Collingsguitars:

    Hi Stefan,

    Thank you for the inquiry. The 470 JL is a hollowbody guitar with a single 4" wide trestle "block", or more of a single brace, if you prefer, that has one single "foot" that makes contact with the back. It is not chambered. It is a custom design specifically made for this guitar to ensure proper structural rigidity and note density while maintaining the weight, feel, and response of a hollowbody instrument.

    The weight of the one I put on the scale yesterday was 6 lbs 5 ounces with the Bigsby and fully strung up ready to go. There will be a little variance from one to the next but they will all be in the 6 to 6 1/2pound range.

    I hope this helps.

    Joe Bastura
    Collings Guitars“



  17. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff
    Got that Email today from Collingsguitars:

    Hi Stefan,

    Thank you for the inquiry. The 470 JL is a hollowbody guitar with a single 4" wide trestle "block", or more of a single brace, if you prefer, that has one single "foot" that makes contact with the back. It is not chambered. It is a custom design specifically made for this guitar to ensure proper structural rigidity and note density while maintaining the weight, feel, and response of a hollowbody instrument.

    The weight of the one I put on the scale yesterday was 6 lbs 5 ounces with the Bigsby and fully strung up ready to go. There will be a little variance from one to the next but they will all be in the 6 to 6 1/2pound range.

    I hope this helps.

    Joe Bastura
    Collings Guitars“


    Excellent info!!! So it is in fact ALOT like a Gretsch with trestle braces. Actually, it's more like the Gretsch ML braces... Except it's one huge brace, wider than the pickups, as opposed to 2 skinner braces on the sides of the pickups.

    Pic of Gretsch ML braces:

    Julian Lage's new Collings (Gretsch Duo Jet copy)-jpg

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    Excellent info!!! So it is in fact ALOT like a Gretsch with trestle braces. Actually, it's more like the Gretsch ML braces... Except it's one huge brace, wider than the pickups, as opposed to 2 skinner braces on the sides of the pickups.

    Pic of Gretsch ML braces:

    Julian Lage's new Collings (Gretsch Duo Jet copy)-jpg
    ...and in fact a lot less like the chambered Duo Jet.

  19. #68

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    most jets come in around the low 7s in weight, i think. then again, i googled gretsch duo jet demos to get to the bottom of this, and i don't know. it sounds pretty hollow to me.


    i don't understand much portuguese but i assume she mentions that at some point. what a helpful demo indeed.

    anyhow, most electric collings are just gibsons with the details ironed out (or the mojo removed) depending on who you ask. i guess it's nice to see them move on to gretsch. maybe they'll get to guild, next.

  20. #69
    Some of that ASMR stuff is bizarre....
    Last edited by ruger9; 01-24-2021 at 09:10 AM.

  21. #70

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    i don't see what's so odd about a brazilian girl with giant cans babbling inaudibly while tapping on a nearly seventy year old guitar that we just happened to be discussing. i can only imagine collings and lage studied the video for hours to get some inspiration for their model.

    this might crack the list of the top ten weirdest things i've stumbled upon while still actually looking for that thing, sort of. what are the odds?

    and though i normally think black is kinda plain, that's a really good looking guitar. sounds pretty good, too.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov;[URL="tel:1092002"
    1092002[/URL]]Lage posted the marketing vid already shared in the OP on youtube today .. followed by this a bit later .. I guess it belongs here?

    wow !
    cant get the smile off my face
    so inventive and ingenious

  23. #72

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    All I see is a beautiful set of Brazilian Duo, feet, and gams. I guess that's the whole point of that video. I gotta flagellate meself now with the cat o'nine tails to dispel such unholy thoughts, a favourite instrument of dominatrices.

  24. #73

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    If the provocative YT video of the Portuguese lady was designed to stimulate sales of this guitar - it missed big time( for that purpose).

    It was likely more successful in providing something else as Jabs poignantly stated.

    Maybe I’m missing something about this guitar - but I don’t find it too appealing.

    However - Julian is a brilliant guitarist - and his creativity has no boundaries. I would have enjoyed seeing perhaps a Julian Lage signature Telecaster.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by QAman; 01-27-2021 at 03:27 PM.

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman View Post

    However - Julian is a brilliant guitarist - and his creativity has no boundaries. I would have enjoyed seeing perhaps a Julian Lage signature Telecaster.
    Unfortunately Danocaster recently closed shop, but the tele Julian recorded Nocturne with was long commercially available .. and his Nash tele is still.

    I mean it won't say Julian Lage or Fender on the headstock, but buying the exact same guitar he plays is doable


    No many builders doing 50s Gretsch reissues, so he went to Collings ... I guess Gretsch themselves didn't see a business case in hiring Julian?

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    Unfortunately Danocaster recently closed shop, but the tele Julian recorded Nocturne with was long commercially available .. and his Nash tele is still.

    I mean it won't say Julian Lage or Fender on the headstock, but buying the exact same guitar he plays is doable


    No many builders doing 50s Gretsch reissues, so he went to Collings ... I guess Gretsch themselves didn't see a business case in hiring Julian?
    Thanks for the info -much appreciated.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    Unfortunately Danocaster recently closed shop, but the tele Julian recorded Nocturne with was long commercially available .. and his Nash tele is still.

    I mean it won't say Julian Lage or Fender on the headstock, but buying the exact same guitar he plays is doable


    No many builders doing 50s Gretsch reissues, so he went to Collings ... I guess Gretsch themselves didn't see a business case in hiring Julian?
    Wasn‘t Nocturne recorded with his Nachocaster which IS his unnamed signature Telecaster?
    And which model should Gretsch offer for a signature guitar?

    Collings was the logical way building a fully hollow electric guitar inspired by Gretsch Duo Jet and Guild Aristocrat) since he‘s already got a Collings Acoustic signature model.

  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff View Post
    Wasn‘t Nocturne recorded with his Nachocaster which IS his unnamed signature Telecaster?
    And which model should Gretsch offer for a signature guitar?

    Collings was the logical way building a fully hollow electric guitar inspired by Gretsch Duo Jet and Guild Aristocrat) since he‘s already got a Collings Acoustic signature model.
    Huge difference between a Nachocaster and a Nash. Stefan is correct. Julian used his Nachocaster on Nocturne. I've played that guitar. It's fabulous. If you want a Julian Lage "Telecaster" the Nachocaster is the way to go!

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Eff View Post
    Wasn‘t Nocturne recorded with his Nachocaster which IS his unnamed signature Telecaster?
    And which model should Gretsch offer for a signature guitar?

    Collings was the logical way building a fully hollow electric guitar inspired by Gretsch Duo Jet and Guild Aristocrat) since he‘s already got a Collings Acoustic signature model.

    I always call that album Nocturne, but it's actually called Arclight. Anyways there are several interviews online, where he says he is playing the Danocaster. This is not the one I remembered, but what a quick google search gave me:
    PressReader.com - Your favorite newspapers and magazines.

    There are others where he clearly states it's the Danocaster on Arclight.

    He was more comfortable on the Dano than the Nash .. and I also remember that he didn't get his 50s blackguard before being (almost?) finished recording Arclight.

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articl...e-twang?page=1


    Since then he has given the Danocaster to his girlfriend Margaret Glaspy and plays his blackguard and the Nash .. go figure?

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    I always call that album Nocturne, but it's actually called Arclight. Anyways there are several interviews online, where he says he is playing the Danocaster. This is not the one I remembered, but what a quick google search gave me:
    PressReader.com - Your favorite newspapers and magazines.

    There are others where he clearly states it's the Danocaster on Arclight.

    He was more comfortable on the Dano than the Nash .. and I also remember that he didn't get his 50s blackguard before being (almost?) finished recording Arclight.

    Julian Lage: Surrender to the Twang | Premier Guitar


    Since then he has given the Danocaster to his girlfriend Margaret Glaspy and plays his blackguard and the Nash .. go figure?
    Not a Nash. A Nachocaster.

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Not a Nash. A Nachocaster.

    Ahh right ... My mistake .. He still doesn't like the Nash then .. makes a lot more sense

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Ahh right ... My mistake .. He still doesn't like the Nash then .. makes a lot more sense
    I'm not sure how Julian feels about Nash guitars. I only know he's been playing a couple different Nachocasters the last number of years.

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Unfortunately Danocaster recently closed shop, but the tele Julian recorded Nocturne with was long commercially available .. and his Nash tele is still.
    Danocaster is back building and has been for some time. He's been posting completed instruments for sale on Instgram, which sell within seconds of them going up. He announced on 19 January that his guitars will now be sold exclusively through LA Vintage Guitars and Amelia Island Fine Guitars.

  34. #83

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    OK, seems like everyone is reading practically all threads, so I'm not going to start a new one for this .. It also fits here, so there is that too .. I just noted that the 2020 players edition G6128T Duo Jets have started dropping in price. At least the black version has just dropped around €400 since I last looked and I'm starting to get tempted.

    But unlike me, it seems like internet hates them. First of all of all they're hating on the tension bar bigsby and pinned bridge, but failing to notice that it is a strings thru bigsby. I like that. I also like that it's a pinned adjustable bridge and I like that it has looking tuners. Finally I like that it has dynasonics and not 'trons.

    Unfortunately I can't find much apart from the official Gretsch marketing video already posted ... All I could find was this one fairly low quality random demo from some bloke that I've posted below ... It's a bit of rockabilly, a bit blues noodling and midway the sound cuts .. but hey


    I'm just curious if I'm the only one on the internet that thinks these seem cool?


  35. #84
    I've never seen a white (vintage white?) one. That's really cool.

    But yeah- for ME, I want the wood bridge, not the stud bridge. And the wood bridge automatically means a non-tension bar Bigsby. IMHO, the stud bridge makes a pretty big difference, and makes the Jet sound more solid than chambered. I think the wood bridge (and subsequent neck angle), help to "bring out" the hollow/chambered tone of the Jet.

  36. #85

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    I have no quarrel with the player editions. I think they are a better choice for most people, especially first time gretschies. Sort of like a Gretsch with training wheels; once you figure it out, you can go for the more traditional models, or just stick with more player editions.

    But for me, I'll take the vintage stylings at least eight times out of ten. I love the weirdness, want the maximum hollowness, and the maximum amount of sonic distance from my other guitars. Were I starting over again with just one or two guitars, I'd probably go with a player edition. I'd certainly consider one for live work and touring.

    But since neither of those are an issue, just give me the most specific and unique tone you got. Not leaving well enough alone-r that I am, I'd mod either one anyway.

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet View Post
    Not leaving well enough alone-r that I am, I'd mod either one anyway.
    So you came by a deal on a players edition that you couldn't pass on .. What are you modding?

  38. #87

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    I wouldn't know until I had it in my hands, really. Most of the things i to mod on a Gretsch became the players edition line: pickups, wiring, cap values, pots, bridges and tuners, usually. I consider every guitar as is and tweak to my whims.

    I tend to prefer stainless steel bridges, so that usually comes first. This has a tone knob so I don't need to play with cap values like I always do. One that's done, I have a better idea of what I'm working with and I can then make a decision on the pups. Never had dynas so I'd be curious about those, but if that doesn't go well, either "better" ones or some of the baby sized filters, which are adorable. Been a supertron guy all these years so I might try something else, but supers would always be a fall back option.

    My primary concerns are what the guitar wants and giving it its own voice so it stands out in my collection. I figure these would slot in between my les Paul and mini'd elitist Sheraton, so if the Gretsch is too close to either it has to change or go, unless I super love it as is.

    Honestly, these are always a temptation for me because they are always on sale, and I love the pretty colors that aren't available on the vintage models. A more open, more jangly Les Paul wouldn't be so bad to me.

  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet View Post
    Honestly, these are always a temptation for me because they are always on sale, and I love the pretty colors that aren't available on the vintage models. A more open, more jangly Les Paul wouldn't be so bad to me.
    Right


    Tho I must admit it's more random GAS/collector thing for me coupled with both going insane from the lockdown/work at home but also spending less cash than I'd normally would.

    Practically speaking I have a plank with P90s and both a tele and a jazzmaster. Not sure I need that Jet for any sonic reasons, tho the dynasonics seem cool and slightly their own thing

  40. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by feet View Post
    My primary concerns are what the guitar wants and giving it its own voice so it stands out in my collection. I figure these would slot in between my les Paul and mini'd elitist Sheraton, so if the Gretsch is too close to either it has to change or go, unless I super love it as is.

    Honestly, these are always a temptation for me because they are always on sale, and I love the pretty colors that aren't available on the vintage models. A more open, more jangly Les Paul wouldn't be so bad to me.
    Couldn't agree more about each guitar having it's own voice... and in my collection, I don't want the difference to be "subtle" either.... so, tele, strat, Gretsch 6120, another tele but it's a thinline with PAF-sounding pickups, a Charvel/Jackson....

    ...and if the VS model came in red sparkle, I'd have bought one already! I don't need another black guitar.

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov;[URL="tel:1099960"
    1099960[/URL]]Right


    Tho I must admit it's more random GAS/collector thing for me coupled with both going insane from the lockdown/work at home but also spending less cash than I'd normally would.

    Practically speaking I have a plank with P90s and both a tele and a jazzmaster. Not sure I need that Jet for any sonic reasons, tho the dynasonics seem cool and slightly their own thing
    I sometimes have a little too much time on my hands to watch demos and peruse reverb and stuff. I keep telling myself I'll get a country gentleman, I'll get a jet, I'll get the 55 falcon and I'll spec out a custom shop, and so on. Hasn't happened yet, but don't let me get stimulated and tax returned at the same time.

    And if you really want to find out about dynasonics, the TV Jones star wood pickups are tele shaped dynas. Dynas are what Gibson cloned to make their staple p90s, if that means anything to you.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    Couldn't agree more about each guitar having it's own voice... and in my collection, I don't want the difference to be "subtle" either.... so, tele, strat, Gretsch 6120, another tele but it's a thinline with PAF-sounding pickups, a Charvel/Jackson....

    ...and if the VS model came in red sparkle, I'd have bought one already! I don't need another black guitar.
    yeah, I've never been a five strats guy or a six spruce and maple archtops kinda guy. If I can't tell what I'm playing in a recording, I won't buy it. I've been able to fight off several guitars, including a regular and custom shop penguin, by plugging into a modeler and trying to nail the tones I'm hearing in demos. That usually shames me in the moment, and all is well until I get bored again.

    I already have black guitars but the old jet with the blocks and the script logo is handsome. But I think most of the finishes are pretty neat. I'd be happy with Caddy Green, or most of the newer finishes. I think part of the reason I was owed obsessed with penguins is because they look so awesome; you get a sonic difference from everything else, and a visual one, too.

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet View Post
    I sometimes have a little too much time on my hands to watch demos and peruse reverb and stuff. I keep telling myself I'll get a country gentleman, I'll get a jet, I'll get the 55 falcon and I'll spec out a custom shop, and so on. Hasn't happened yet, but don't let me get stimulated and tax returned at the same time.

    And if you really want to find out about dynasonics, the TV Jones star wood pickups are tele shaped dynas. Dynas are what Gibson cloned to make their staple p90s, if that means anything to you.
    I actually took my P90s axe and played along with the the Gretsch dynasonic demo's. A different vibe to my ears. The dynas are thinner and brighter than my P90s.


    PS. Yeah, I like my guitars to be different too .. I have two archtops a PM100 and a PM120, but even those two have quite different vibes. Apart from that they're all different. Got the 3 main fender models and a P90s, humbucker and mini-humbucker plank.

  43. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by feet View Post
    That usually shames me in the moment, and all is well until I get bored again.
    .
    haha... you and I are GAS brothers from another mother! I do the same!

  44. #93

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    This is kinda interesting .. They've posted yet another promo video of Julian playing. This time it's a well known track of his, so you can compare existing recordings

    I choose this one cause there is no band .. Just Julian and his tele (I like the esthetics of the tele better tbh)

  45. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    This is kinda interesting .. They've posted yet another promo video of Julian playing. This time it's a well known track of his, so you can compare existing recordings

    I choose this one cause there is no band .. Just Julian and his tele (I like the esthetics of the tele better tbh)
    The difference in crunch make this a tough comparison. I prefer the cleaner tone on the tele video personally. I love the looks of the Collings though

  46. #95

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    I like both versions. You can hear his development...
    But man, what a powerful pickup, it sounds vintage and modern at the same time.

  47. #96
    On the tele he's using the neck pickup. On the Collings he's using the bridge. A bit of an apples vs oranges.