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  1. #1

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    I have a Gibson 335 on order and getting a bit worried as I see many saying it's just too big and not comfortable. I do love the sound, but now I'm wondering

    Does the 339, does it sound much different?

    Is it better to get the smaller bodied one?

    Is it really that uncomfortable?

    Thanks so much!

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  3. #2

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    I was wondering about the comparison of the two too. There is also the ES Les Paul:
    Gibson Memphis ES-Les Paul

  4. #3

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    The 335 has been played by thousands and thousands since the 1950s. Its size and shape are just as copied as a Strat or an LP, the latter not exactly an ergonomic treat. It's only recently that I've seen some people whine about 335s being uncomfortable. At the same time, others attest to how much comfier they are than full-size archtops. I have an EPI take of the 339. While a joy to play sitting and standing, it sounds dry and definitely doesn't have the ring of a DOT. I would assume the same to apply to Gibsons as well.

  5. #4
    It's very much a matter of taste. To my ear, they're as different as any two guitars of the same type. In other words, the variation between a two individual 335's sounds about as much as between a 335 and a 339. I love the size of the 339 myself, it's very much like the smaller Ibanez AM50 Stagemasters from the early 80's which have been my all time favourites.
    I have compared the Epi version of the 339 with the Gibson and there, there is a difference. The disparity of body materials used and everything put together somehow makes it a different feel and sound. The epis were nice but Gibson examples I've played and worked on felt like good 335's and here's the big thing, they age really well. They play in and they get better with use and they seem to keep getting better over time.
    Sound is not the distinguishing factour between these two guitars IMHO but the feel against the body is everything. The 335 tucks against the body and has a more centralized point of balance, lower in the body. The 339 feels more "invisible" to me, the mass is definitely less and it seems to float less obtrusively. Your body type, the way you hold the guitar, the type of contact you find desirable, what feels stable to you-it's a choice. For that you need to try them and decide that for yourself.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by comnexis
    I have a Gibson 335 on order and getting a bit worried as I see many saying it's just too big and not comfortable. I do love the sound, but now I'm wondering

    Does the 339, does it sound much different?

    Is it better to get the smaller bodied one?

    Is it really that uncomfortable?

    Thanks so much!

  7. #6

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    An ES-345TDSVT was my #1 for many years. I found it versatile, comfortable, and stable under my right arm. I played standing and had no difficulties. Now on my 70s, I find the 339 type to be interesting, as I play only seated, and the scaled-down body seems a good idea. I'm sure you'll be happy with a 335, and if not, it should retain a solid resale value. I don't think there is a wrong choice, here. Good luck!

  8. #7

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    To OP,
    (Disclaimer: The below is my personal opinion, generalized. and not a statement of absolute fact.)
    (Age, overall body size and arm lengths can be factors in what is comfortable or not for any given player. For example I am 5'9" with a 32" shelve lenght. No belly gut at 62.)

    -At one time the variety of guitar models and features was fairly stable with common models, solid, semi and hollow bodies.

    -The 16" and 17" archtop was the common bout size.

    -The ES 335 was standard as there was limited demand for a small guitar design. Also this model had a "Thinline" design with a thinner rim depth at +- 2". This design was a depart from a wider rim depth, 2.5" -4" for typical 16"-17" archtop guitars.

    -I bought both a Epi and Gibson ES335s around 2007-2010. I was in heaven.

    - In 2010 I bought an Ibanez AG 95. Why? It was a hollowbody with a 14" lower bout. At that time, a hollowbody like this were uncommon.

    - In 2013, Jim Soloway forum member and guitar builder designed his guitars at 15". This is based on his experince. I purchase one of his semihollow guitars that year.

    - Around 2014 Gibson came out with a 15" archtop guitar the ES 275. The reason was in response to Japanese players demand. I bought 2 of these.

    - 2021 After a major sell off the last several years, I own the Epi ES 339, 14", with major hardware, circuit, and pickup (Lollar Imperial low winds).

    Also, I have the Epi Johnny A Custom Limited edition guitar. This model comes standard with Gibson "57 pickups. I had my luthier convert it from a Bigsby to a stopbar configuration. Hardware, circuit, bone nut upgrades. This model is a flattop semihollow body with a 14" bout.

    I believe, in my opinion, order a particular guitar your intrested in from a store, I use Sweetwater, with a 30-45 day return policy. No questions ask. Then you can take your time to evaluate the guitar under your conditions. Going to big box store in my opinion is only helpful to see a model in person before buying.

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143731-jpg
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143614-jpg
    Last edited by Wildcat; 01-02-2021 at 07:19 PM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by comnexis
    I have a Gibson 335 on order and getting a bit worried as I see many saying it's just too big and not comfortable. I do love the sound, but now I'm wondering

    Does the 339, does it sound much different?

    Is it better to get the smaller bodied one?

    Is it really that uncomfortable?

    Thanks so much!
    I have a 335-sized semi-hollow and find it very comfortable to play. I've tried several 339's and did not find them noticeably more comfortable. It largely depends on your body size and how you hold the guitar, so the only way to know is to try it, but the 335 size works for an awful lot of people.

    John

  10. #9

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    It's a potato potata thing .. The 339s tend to be ever so slightly darker in my experience, but other wise it's same same. I like the 335 better. The 339 might be slightly more comfortable, but the 335 is cooler

  11. #10

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    I'm on the tall side and have the same problem with a 339 that I have with every and each Les Paul I try to play - they're just too small and fat. For me, it's like holding a cat in the lap and trying to comb her sidewise. Not the best metaphor in the world, I know - it simply means "trying to do something very awkward in a narrow space".

    My 335 is my ideal Gibson. It supports my right hand much better and doesn't make me want to lean over the guitar.

  12. #11

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    If you prefer smaller guitars go with the ES-339. But the ES-335 has a very identifiable midrange tonally. Either way you'll be happy, or do what I did get one of each!

  13. #12

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    I have had most of the Gibson 300 series, ES330, ES335 ,Es345,ES 355 all were superb
    I must concur with our friend citizenK74 here, as I approach my dotage ,the size of the
    above models becomes uncomfortable, and particularly when seated. I luckily acquired
    a Gibson CS356 which is of similar dimensions to the Es336/339, but vastly different,
    described by Gibson as in The Les Paul range. Imo superior to its larger brethren, by
    virtue of it not being of laminate construction, the back and sides are one piece carved
    from the solid, scooped out to be a semi~hollow with a maple cap as the top, It is
    the mirror image of the Es355 Custom with a figured top, and the same ornamentation
    with a rim mounted jack socket. Its size is very comfortable for standing or seated play.
    There is little difference in the tone or volume compared to the full sized versions.
    Mine is a 2004 case queen unplayed for 16 years untilI I found it in 2020. If you want
    to hear and see a demo , look on YT for a demonstration by a very good veteran player
    Mitch Holder at Wildwood guitars, cc 2012.

    edited with additional information

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    The 335 has been played by thousands and thousands since the 1950s. Its size and shape are just as copied as a Strat or an LP, the latter not exactly an ergonomic treat. It's only recently that I've seen some people whine about 335s being uncomfortable. At the same time, others attest to how much comfier they are than full-size archtops. I have an EPI take of the 339. While a joy to play sitting and standing, it sounds dry and definitely doesn't have the ring of a DOT. I would assume the same to apply to Gibsons as well.
    Thank you!

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    An ES-345TDSVT was my #1 for many years. I found it versatile, comfortable, and stable under my right arm. I played standing and had no difficulties. Now on my 70s, I find the 339 type to be interesting, as I play only seated, and the scaled-down body seems a good idea. I'm sure you'll be happy with a 335, and if not, it should retain a solid resale value. I don't think there is a wrong choice, here. Good luck!
    Thanks so much

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    It's very much a matter of taste. To my ear, they're as different as any two guitars of the same type. In other words, the variation between a two individual 335's sounds about as much as between a 335 and a 339. I love the size of the 339 myself, it's very much like the smaller Ibanez AM50 Stagemasters from the early 80's which have been my all time favourites.
    I have compared the Epi version of the 339 with the Gibson and there, there is a difference. The disparity of body materials used and everything put together somehow makes it a different feel and sound. The epis were nice but Gibson examples I've played and worked on felt like good 335's and here's the big thing, they age really well. They play in and they get better with use and they seem to keep getting better over time.
    Sound is not the distinguishing factour between these two guitars IMHO but the feel against the body is everything. The 335 tucks against the body and has a more centralized point of balance, lower in the body. The 339 feels more "invisible" to me, the mass is definitely less and it seems to float less obtrusively. Your body type, the way you hold the guitar, the type of contact you find desirable, what feels stable to you-it's a choice. For that you need to try them and decide that for yourself.
    Thank you so much for your thoughts!

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Wildcat
    To OP,
    (Disclaimer: The below is my personal opinion, generalized. and not a statement of absolute fact.)
    (Age, overall body size and arm lengths can be factors in what is comfortable or not for any given player. For example I am 5'9" with a 32" shelve lenght. No belly gut at 62.)

    -At one time the variety of guitar models and features was fairly stable with common models, solid, semi and hollow bodies.

    -The 16" and 17" archtop was the common bout size.

    -The ES 335 was standard as there was limited demand for a small guitar design. Also this model had a "Thinline" design with a thinner rim depth at +- 2". This design was a depart from a wider rim depth, 2.5" -4" for typical 16"-17" archtop guitars.

    -I bought both a Epi and Gibson ES335s around 2007-2010. I was in heaven.

    - In 2010 I bought an Ibanez AG 95. Why? It was a hollowbody with a 14" lower bout. At that time, a hollowbody like this were uncommon.

    - In 2013, Jim Soloway forum member and guitar builder designed his guitars at 15". This is based on his experince. I purchase one of his semihollow guitars that year.

    - Around 2014 Gibson came out with a 15" archtop guitar the ES 275. The reason was in response to Japanese players demand. I bought 2 of these.

    - 2021 After a major sell off the last several years, I own the Epi ES 339, 14", with major hardware, circuit, and pickup (Lollar Imperial low winds).

    Also, I have the Epi Johnny A Custom Limited edition guitar. This model comes standard with Gibson "57 pickups. I had my luthier convert it from a Bigsby to a stopbar configuration. Hardware, circuit, bone nut upgrades. This model is a flattop semihollow body with a 14" bout.

    I believe, in my opinion, order a particular guitar your intrested in from a store, I use Sweetwater, with a 30-45 day return policy. No questions ask. Then you can take your time to evaluate the guitar under your conditions. Going to big box store in my opinion is only helpful to see a model in person before buying.

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143731-jpg
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143614-jpg
    Thank you for giving me your thoughts , really appreciate it!

  18. #17

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    Since 335 variability in sound is all over the place due to Gibson installing a "PUP of the month" IMO it's tough to pigeon hole "the" sound of a 335. I have a killer ES-333, and have played dud 335's I wouldn't trade for it. The 335 (OK and the 175) is the Gibson I'd REALLY recommend an in person try out before buying unless you're trying a specific year with exact pups, even then you can get one that's heavier or lighter in the same year affecting the sound.

    The 339 may be less so but there's still variation from weight and pups used over the years.

    Many thousands of players do not feel the 335 is too big, others did and Gibson made the 339 (and other small semis) to accommodate these players.

  19. #18

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    This is a subject I know a bit about. In 1962 I bought an ES-355 and found it to be a perfect guitar for much of what I was playing at the time. I'm a short guy but it fit well sitting or standing. Over the next forty years I owned at least one or several or many for all except a few years in the '60's when circumstances were beyond my control, and it remained my favorite model for all my non-jazz gigs over that time. In the late '70's I tried a small-bodied Ibanez semi, but back then I much preferred the larger 355.

    Twenty-one years I started a process of downsizing my guitar collection, not only in number but in dimensions, replacing 18" and 17" x 3&3/8" guitars with ones that measure 15.5" x 2&5/8" and when I did that discovered that the 16" x 8-10 lb ES-355 was no longer comfortable for me. Luckily Gibson came out with just what I needed, the much smaller and lighter CS-356. It has the 355 aesthetic that made me choose my first one, but an entirely different construction. When I first got it it took me a bit to get used to both the sound and feel, but soon came to prefer both to that of the 355. It doesn't have the punch of a 355, but it's got a warmer, fuller sound. The ES-339 is the same size as the 356, but is constructed like the 335 and sounds more like it.

    Since my bigger archtops are all 25.5" scale I was very interested when Gibson introduced a new artist-model guitar with construction similar to the CS-356 but with a somewhat larger body and the longer scale. I was somewhat skeptical about it, but met the artist, Johnny A, at the Winter NAMM show in 2004 and was really impressed both by him and the guitar. Because of the longer scale, this model displaced the 356 for me for a number of years, but in recent years I've been playing and enjoying both models. The Johnny A has a more open, brighter sound than the 356; both feel and play great, and which I use depends on my mood.

    Photos, of course:

    With a '71 ES-355TDSV:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-71-355-drw_01_01-jpg

    In '91 with an '82:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-diettes-355-showman-1-jpg

    In '94 with a BB King Custom, a 355TDSV sans f-holes:

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-diettes-12-003-jpg

    In 2003 with a '94--a fabulous instrument that was the last 355 I gigged with:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-dscn0695-jpg

    In 2007 with a Johnny A:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-thanksgiving-new-179-jpg

    and a size comparison:

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-semis-1-jpg

    Just a final thought--you can't go wrong with whichever you choose!

    Danny W.

  20. #19

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    I owned both. Sold the 339. I find that the 335 is more comfortable and sounds better than the 339. Because of its size, I find it more versatile. As others have said, I think the 339 is darker sounding.
    Last edited by joebloggs13; 01-07-2021 at 09:52 PM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    I was wondering about the comparison of the two too. There is also the ES Les Paul:
    Gibson Memphis ES-Les Paul
    Of the 3 guitars mentioned, this is the one I gas for. 335s are big (I own a Gretsch 6120, so I'm familiar with "big" LOL), the 339 is a totally hollow guitar UNLIKE the 335 which has a center block. The ES-Les Paul is more like the 339, but even smaller, and all the demo vids I've seen- of jazz tones even- are quite good. It's actually like a "mini ES-295"... which was it's intent. There's a guitar player in the Spanish market- El Twanguero he calls himself, (Diego Garcia), he's actually a favorite of mine, he always played ES-295s, Gibson approached him and said "we want to make you a guitar, what do you want?" And he told them "a smaller, lighter, 295". Voila! The ES-LP was born: (if I had the scratch, I would already own it!)

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-jpg

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildcat

    Also, I have the Epi Johnny A Custom Limited edition guitar. This model comes standard with Gibson "57 pickups. I had my luthier convert it from a Bigsby to a stopbar configuration. Hardware, circuit, bone nut upgrades. This model is a flattop semihollow body with a 14" bout.


    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143731-jpg
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-20210102_143614-jpg
    How do you like the Johnny A? That's one I have had serious thoughts about...

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    the 339 is a totally hollow guitar UNLIKE the 335 which has a center block.
    No .. The 339 has a center block just like the 335


    The fully hollow one is the 390, tho the 390s where only made for a few years around 2014-15'ish. One version with mini-humbuckers followed by a P90s version later on. Great little guitars if you can find them.



  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    No .. The 339 has a center block just like the 335


    The fully hollow one is the 390, tho the 390s where only made for a few years around 2014-15'ish. One version with mini-humbuckers followed by a P90s version later on. Great little guitars if you can find them.
    Apologies... I researched this awhile back, and remembered incorrectly.... this is a good page, from Gibson themselves, on the various differences of their ES models:

    The ES-335 and ES-339: What’s the Difference?

  25. #24

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    +1 Johnny A scale 25.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    This is a subject I know a bit about. In 1962 I bought an ES-355 and found it to be a perfect guitar for much of what I was playing at the time. I'm a short guy but it fit well sitting or standing. Over the next forty years I owned at least one or several or many for all except a few years in the '60's when circumstances were beyond my control, and it remained my favorite model for all my non-jazz gigs over that time. In the late '70's I tried a small-bodied Ibanez semi, but back then I much preferred the larger 355.

    Twenty-one years I started a process of downsizing my guitar collection, not only in number but in dimensions, replacing 18" and 17" x 3&3/8" guitars with ones that measure 15.5" x 2&5/8" and when I did that discovered that the 16" x 8-10 lb ES-355 was no longer comfortable for me. Luckily Gibson came out with just what I needed, the much smaller and lighter CS-356. It has the 355 aesthetic that made me choose my first one, but an entirely different construction. When I first got it it took me a bit to get used to both the sound and feel, but soon came to prefer both to that of the 355. It doesn't have the punch of a 355, but it's got a warmer, fuller sound. The ES-339 is the same size as the 356, but is constructed like the 335 and sounds more like it.

    Since my bigger archtops are all 25.5" scale I was very interested when Gibson introduced a new artist-model guitar with construction similar to the CS-356 but with a somewhat larger body and the longer scale. I was somewhat skeptical about it, but met the artist, Johnny A, at the Winter NAMM show in 2004 and was really impressed both by him and the guitar. Because of the longer scale, this model displaced the 356 for me for a number of years, but in recent years I've been playing and enjoying both models. The Johnny A has a more open, brighter sound than the 356; both feel and play great, and which I use depends on my mood.

    Photos, of course:

    With a '71 ES-355TDSV:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-71-355-drw_01_01-jpg

    In '91 with an '82:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-diettes-355-showman-1-jpg

    In '94 with a BB King Custom, a 355TDSV sans f-holes:

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-diettes-12-003-jpg

    In 2003 with a '94--a fabulous instrument that was the last 355 I gigged with:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-dscn0695-jpg

    In 2007 with a Johnny A:
    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-thanksgiving-new-179-jpg

    and a size comparison:

    Gibson ES-335 vs 339?-semis-1-jpg

    Just a final thought--you can't go wrong with whichever you choose!

    Danny W.

  26. #25

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    Size, width 14" width 1.65", build construction, and 25.5 scale.
    (I own the Epi Johnny A model)
    Very similar, but downgraded for example AAA Maple top is veneer and not hand carved. Cheap hardware.....
    But comes with stock Gibson '57 pickups and ebony fretboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    How do you like the Johnny A? That's one I have had serious thoughts about...

  27. #26

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    Not to derail too much—I like the look and vibe of the 335 very much, and owned a nice Epi Dot for a couple of years, but there are a lot of single-cut thinlines either semi or fully hollow that will do what most people here want from a guitar in a jazz setting.

    I have an ES-135 and Peerless Sunset and find the ergonomics much more favorable that the 335-style. I also think it’s easier to get a reasonable jazz tone, though Larry Carlton and Grant Green might beg to differ.

    It’s of course a matter of personal preference.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    No .. The 339 has a center block just like the 335


    The fully hollow one is the 390, tho the 390s where only made for a few years around 2014-15'ish. One version with mini-humbuckers followed by a P90s version later on. Great little guitars if you can find them.


    I have what I think is the first year of production with a 2013 mini humbucker version. It has a natural finish mahogany '59-like neck/back of headstock whereas the P-90 later years they were all finished black on the backside. I love mine. I don't think that it has "neck dive" which is what I see as one of the criticisms. If I played out I might consider revamping the electronics a bit for more output but they are fine for my home playing. Nice guitars but they have shot up in price since I got mine. They were sleepers a while back right after production stopped.

  29. #28

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    335 is a very comfortable shape. Of course if you've only ever played a strat it will be very different at first and you'll say it's uncomfortable. It just takes a little while to adjust. It keeps your arms at a good height while sitting.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff;[URL="tel:1087773"
    1087773[/URL]]

    I have an ES-135 and Peerless Sunset and find the ergonomics much more favorable that the 335-style.
    It’s of course a matter of personal preference.
    just personally .... i agree
    a 335 stocks in my ribs (and is
    uncomfortable on my leg) when sitting down ....
    very nice when standing tho
    ———-
    a peerless sunset the/size 16” arch top
    not too thick
    is most comfortable for me
    ————
    different strokes for different folks

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    I have what I think is the first year of production with a 2013 mini humbucker version. It has a natural finish mahogany '59-like neck/back of headstock whereas the P-90 later years they were all finished black on the backside. I love mine. I don't think that it has "neck dive" which is what I see as one of the criticisms. If I played out I might consider revamping the electronics a bit for more output but they are fine for my home playing. Nice guitars but they have shot up in price since I got mine. They were sleepers a while back right after production stopped.
    Ah yeah 2013-2015, which the 15s being the P90s version. The P90s version was only available in red (back was also red) with the mini-humbucker version was a burst and a black one .. Mine was black.

    I kinda regret selling it .. It was the ultimate couch guitar. Lightest guitar I've ever played. I just wasn't happy with the mini-humbucker .. Great for blues, but too scooped for jazz .. Mostly treble and bass, so I sold it in order to get a ES175 type guitar.

    Looking back I probably should have kept it and just change the neck for something with more mid-range. Didn't realize that you could get mid-rangey mini-humbuckers back then tho .. oh well win some and you lose some.

    I highly recommend the ES390 with the caveat that it is a scooped sound, so if that isn't your thing then ...

  32. #31
    I think a Gibson335 is a standard ,just like song can be standards.

  33. #32

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    There are sunburst ES-390 P-90 versions out there. They just have black painted necks and the backs of their headstocks are also painted black. The neck profile may also be on the slim side, but someone else would need to verify that. The mini hums have adjustable pole pieces so you can dial them around. If I wanted to get really crazy with tone tweaking though, I would probably have Lindy Fralin help me with a special wind. Maybe at some future date. I have 11 guitars within arms reach. I don't need to get any more fanatical at the moment.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    There are sunburst ES-390 P-90 versions out there. They just have black painted necks and the backs of their headstocks are also painted black. The neck profile may also be on the slim side, but someone else would need to verify that. The mini hums have adjustable pole pieces so you can dial them around. If I wanted to get really crazy with tone tweaking though, I would probably have Lindy Fralin help me with a special wind. Maybe at some future date. I have 11 guitars within arms reach. I don't need to get any more fanatical at the moment.
    Ok .... just never saw a burst P90s version in the wild

    Yeah ... getting a custom mini humbucker would be sweet. Saw someone putting a minihumbucker version of the '59 from seymour duncans custom shop in his Ibanez GB10. That is the precise moment I thought ... Maybe I shouldnt have sold my es390 Gibson ES-335 vs 339?

    Sendt fra min SM-G981B med Tapatalk

  35. #34

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    the current epi casino coupe is along the lines of the gibby 390...smaller body, hollow except for small block under bridge, and p-90's




    cheers

  36. #35

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    Just my personal preference. My first "really good" guitar was an ES-335. I was young and skinny (and handsome ). Now, even with my increased girth, every time I pick up a 335 style guitar (mine is currently a cheap knockoff) I feel like I have "come home"! Any smaller body just doesn't feel right.

    of coursem ymmv

  37. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I think a Gibson335 is a standard ,just like song can be standards.
    Bigger body bigger sound!!!

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    Bigger body bigger sound!!!
    That’s my excuse for gaining 5 lbs this holiday season...

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    That’s my excuse for gaining 5 lbs this holiday season...
    How does make for a bigger sound? Oops, I don't really want to know.

  40. #39

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    Personally my Gibson ES335 is a very comfortable guitar to play standing or sitting. I’m 5’-10”, not sure if that makes a difference.

  41. #40

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    Every time you guys post about such-and-such guitar I get a bad GAS attack for the same.

    335 vs 339?

    It’s like “Ginger vs MaryAnne”...(RIP)

  42. #41

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    Mine is a 339 size whereas dad has a 335. I don't think there's much of a sound difference. Mine is comfortable and I love it, but there is some mojo with a 335... I'll concede that it is the "cooler" guitar.