Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 49 of 49
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hey all - looking to fill a whole in my arsenal. Need a LP. Brand not super important, but I’d like to keep it around $1500 new or used.

    Gotta have a fast playing neck/fretboard, great pickups, and I really prefer binding on the fretboard too. Anything out there that’s good in that price range? I’m only familiar with the stuff Gibson’s making which are all $2000 or more. Thanks!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    In that price range, your best bet is probably an Epiphone. Especially anything labeled "Pro"... many times these pickups have the very same pickups the more expensive Gibson models do. I recommend looking at the Epiphone Les Pauls, and include the ES (semi-hollow) Les Pauls while you're at it.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Check out Heritage H-150's on the used market.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Used Eastman!

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    +1 on the Eastman SB59.

    I have the SB59 in gold burst varnish. I bought it second hand and the previous owner switched the already excellent pickups for Amber Spirit of '59 pickups. It sounds really, really amazing.

    I once took it to a guitar shop to test drive an amp and the sales guy was blown away by the sound. The SB's with P90's are also amazing.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Epiphone Black Beauty

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Used, player’s grade Gibson Les Paul Classics can often be found in the $1500 range.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    1979-1982 tokai ls-80

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    I see used Les Paul Classics and Traditionals going for about that on Craigslist locally, maybe up to $1800.

    I have always liked the sound of the Les Paul, but I've yet to find one that was comfortable to play. Something about how the neck interfaces with the body that I haven't generally cared for, as well as the weight/density of the thing. But they sure sound good!

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    You need to play the exact guitar you plan to buy.

    Let me say that again, because it goes double for LPs: you need to play the exact guitar you plan to buy. Not one of the same model and year in another city or one just like it that is hanging next to it in your local music shop.

    Gibson Les Pauls (at least the original versions of the Standard, Deluxe and Custom) are HIGHLY variable in terms of playability. I played at least a hundred or more of them over the course of a few years while shopping for my current LP, an early 70s Deluxe that has a very friendly neck.

    In contrast, almost every PRS LP-style guitar I've test-driven had a pretty good neck. I did NOT play hundreds of these, just a few, out of curiosity, after a friend of mine picked up a PRS that was really nice.

    Each of the basic LP styles also has its own sound and its own neck profile, so, again, PLAY these guitars to understand what they feel like and sound like.

    The Standard has the widest neck, with the Custom and the Deluxe being a bit narrower. Again, this is just my experience with the older LPs - I stopped shopping them seriously decades ago, cuz you can't have my Deluxe till you pry it from my cold, dead hands :-)

    I had a late 70s or early 80s Custom before I swapped that out for my current Deluxe for two reasons: the ebony fingerboard on the Custom had a thinner tone than the warmer rosewood neck on the Deluxe, and the Custom weighed a million pounds, give or take... if you get a Custom, get thyself a WIDE strap. And maybe a massage therapist for your shoulder after the gig.

    Gig? What's that? Some pre-COVID ritual?

    'Course, now Gibby makes chambered Pauls that are supposed to be a bit lighter... I think that the weight and sound of the chambered models has been discussed elsewhere on JGF.

    The Standard also has a rosewood neck stock, but there may be other combos available now.

    Deluxes are often pooh-poohed for the smaller PUPs that they came with originally; when I got mine the stock minis had already been replaced with standard sized Gibson humbuckers. Later on I swapped in a neck pickup I had saved from my Custom and it still has a Dimarzio SD in the tail from my rockin' days...

    I think you can now get the Deluxe with standard-sized humbuckers. The small ones may not even be available anymore.

    Anyhoo, hope this helps. Oh, and thanks for prompting me to head to Reverb and find that my Deluxe is now worth something like 8x what I paid for it in the early 80s :-)
    Last edited by starjasmine; 10-24-2020 at 06:32 PM.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    I just bought a Guild Aristocrat for $700 that is due to be delivered Monday. It is an RI but pretty faithful to the originals, which go for 4-5K. LP sized but fully hollow with a spruce top, no F holes, and Franz pickups.

  13. #12
    Thanks for the suggestions all. I should note that I plan to use this axe for everything BUT jazz. While I’m a jazz player, I’m itching for the right tool to play some rock and blues. I’m also checking out PRS guitars, used to have one as a kid but sold it soon after. From all the comparisons I’ve seen, I’m liking the Gibson’s more. They’re just THE sound..,

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Yamaha Lord Player or Studio Lord, or Yamaha SG.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Les Paul Traditional were sold for $1500 a few years ago and I see them by selling in the $1500-1700 range now. I got mine for $1500 and would not sell it. Not sure why they sold so cheap, but I think it is because everyone was weighing their Les Pauls back then and these were the last ones with solid construction, with no extra weight-reducing holes no circuit boards or fancy switching.
    This one has good balance between the neck and bridge pickup.

    Les Paul Recommendations please?-les-paul-traditional-jpg
    Last edited by icr; 10-25-2020 at 11:20 AM.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MHoranzy
    Thanks for the suggestions all. I should note that I plan to use this axe for everything BUT jazz. While I’m a jazz player, I’m itching for the right tool to play some rock and blues. I’m also checking out PRS guitars, used to have one as a kid but sold it soon after. From all the comparisons I’ve seen, I’m liking the Gibson’s more. They’re just THE sound..,
    A Les Paul bridge pickup through a raging Marshall is indeed THAT sound.

    My problem with Les Pauls has always been getting the 2 pickups to balance tonally... get a nice thick tone on the bridge, the neck is muddy. Get a fat-but-clear tone on the neck pickup, the bridge is shrill. There are ways around that, but that's another thread....

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    A Les Paul bridge pickup through a raging Marshall is indeed THAT sound.

    My problem with Les Pauls has always been getting the 2 pickups to balance tonally... get a nice thick tone on the bridge, the neck is muddy. Get a fat-but-clear tone on the neck pickup, the bridge is shrill. There are ways around that, but that's another thread....
    Now you mention this, I never had that trouble with a superstrat. I do with my current guitar which has two HB's.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    As others have stated, try to play the guitar first. The fret wire on different models and years can be very different. Seems like Gibson for quite a while went with very large, tall, square frets that (to me) are very uncomfortable to play. For me, it's all about the neck and fret comfort/playability.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    Now you mention this, I never had that trouble with a superstrat. I do with my current guitar which has two HB's.
    It's pretty common. It's actually why the superstrat was invented: Les Paul in the bridge, Strat in the neck. It's a wonderful thing! (I have one).

    There are tricks to "de-mud" a neck pickup in this situation, it's cheap, easy, and it works. You simply put a capacitor inline with the neck pickup's hot lead. So neck pickup>capacitor>volume control or switch, however your guitar is wired. There's an article online by Seymour Duncan, where they recommend a .047uf cap for this job, but many of us on the various forums think this is a typo, based on our own experiences/experiments... and we recommend a .0047uf cap. I've done it on level guitars, It works well.

    The last PAF I did it on, I ended up with a .0033uf. The larger the cap value, the more low end is cut. Look up "humbucker de-mud mod" if you want to go down this rabbit hole. The good news is, once you find the right cap value for your pickup, it's a set-it-and-forget-it thing.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    's actually why the superstrat was invented
    Really? Didn't know that.

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    Really? Didn't know that.
    BTW, I added some more info to me previous post...

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Godin is a very underrated company imo (made in Canada). I'd give this one a test drive:

    Different pup's in each of these demos.






  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    There is also the less expensive Goding Classic SG, without the extra features, more like a Gibson les paul. A great bargain.


  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    I can’t believe how much this plank of wood costs.

    When I was in high school they were, IIRC, in the $300 range or so. In fact, despite being the axe of choice for Jimmy Page and others, they were falling out of favor. Used ones even from the 50’s were easily available.

    I would like to get one though. I am thinking of buying a kit from Stew Mac or GFS to make my own.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    I haven't played my Les Paul since I bought a 1971 Guild M-75. It's a solid mahogany body with two HB-1 pick ups and a nice fat neck. These are fairly inexpensive and great players. Check one out before you buy a Les Paul.

    Thanks John

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    I am digging my 2017 Les Paul Studio. It does have an unbound neck though. The 2018 Les Paul Studio has a bound neck and can be had for under $1500.

    Gibson Les Paul Studio Vintage Sunburst | Blue Mountain | Reverb

  27. #26
    Can anyone vouch for the value of splurging for the Gibson LP “standard” over a studio?

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    To me the used market is your friend .. and you can always flip it .. The LP Standard is (an evergreen that is sold in large numbers) and The Classic would be my first choices, while the traditional has a too big necks and weights to much to my taste


    They're are usually prices way too high, but with a good bit of patience you can get them all at nice prices. I gave $1300 for a 2007 Standard recently and I'm in Scandinavia, where prices probably are higher then in the US.
    Off course that is a once or twice a year type deal with a bit of haggling, but if below $1500 should be fairly easily doable.

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    I like the MIJapan Tokai, Deviser Bacchus, ESP Edwards. You might have to scour Digimart.net to find them for sale in Japan.

    These really look the part and play well.

    LS196

  30. #29

    User Info Menu


  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    That was a great video. Eastman comes away looking and sounding great! Love the violin finish!

    (Though for myself, I'd look at the Heritage H150 or vintage Tokai LS-80 mentioned upthread. I have a Heritage 535 and 575 and a couple vintage Tokai "Springy Sound" Strats (ST-70, ST-80) and a "Breezy Sound" Tele (TE-70) that I like a lot. Tokai called their LP copies "Reborn Old" or something similar at first, then switched to "Love Rock" around 1980.)

    Last edited by Flat; 10-24-2020 at 04:16 PM.

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    A Les Paul! Good decision!

    And very good advice here already.

    I’ll throw in my story that leads to one observation about ”The Right Les Paul”.

    After Tokai Love Rocks (ok but felt a toy when I got my first Gibby) I played USA Standards from early 1990s for about a decade. Loved them.

    Then I ”had to have” a Goldtop and bought a Deluxe from ’79. Maple neck. After really trying I had to admit: I hated it. Sold it.

    Then I saved and traded and bought my first Custom Shop LP, RI’56 (nowadays with Antiquity P90s). Best guitar I have ever had.

    Bought a couple more USA LPs, didn’t bond them and finally found a decently priced used RI ’58. The second best guitar I have ever had. (The Burstbuckers are great but ECP RD59 Hybrid pickups are greater!)

    The observation is that You can find a good LP that You love and will make You a better musician. But the Custom Shop LPs are miles ahead from that.

    Is it the long tenon? Better woods? I don’t know, it feels like ’a bit better’ in every little things.

    Or maybe I just am lucky. Or stupid.

    (My R6 is from 2007 and the R8 is from 2012, I don’t know about the models and QC after that.)

    Good luck and happy playing whatever LP You decide to buy!

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    I'd second checking out the Eastman. Great guitar for the money. If you are set on a Gibson, I heartily recommend playing as many as possible until you get one that speaks to you within your price range. I'd would normally suggest attending one of the larger guitar shows as the ones I've attended are chock a block with Les Pauls. But Covid has killed that off as well I imagine.

    I bought my first Les Paul in 1973 and it wasn't cheap then either. It cost me $425.00 at the time and I had to pay an extra $50.00 for a case. And good condition classic years 58-60 were more expensive.

    I've never been partial to the full size humbucker equipped Paul for the reasons others have mentioned so my Gibson Les Paul of choice is a Deluxe Gold Top with a Kinman P90 noiseless in the bridge and a Lollar Mini-Hum in the neck.

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    I would look for a used Gibson Les Paul classic or traditional, you can often find one around 1500. Try to check out one with P90s, as they are excellent for blues, and many prefer them to PAFs. Also the Les Paul Junior is an option if going for P90s..

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    I've had a few Gibsons ans an Epiphone that was quite nice - contoured top with a nice quilted veneer in a deep ruby red; loaded with a pair of Duncam hbs ( a Jazz and a '59 PAF type) - sounded righteous, looked, felt, and played (not to mention weighed) like the "real thing." The Gibsons were a '69 Custom in black with the matchstick "Fretless Wonder" frets worn down nearly to the ebony fb wearing a Bigsby (cos' LPs aren't quite heavy enough) with a custom set of my own devising of 15 - 60 strings of various types; a "55/78" "reissue" with soapbar P-90s all-mahogany slab-bodied grooviness that I used primarily as a back-up for many years, and a Les Paul Junior "Special" (so sayeth the tr cover) with 490s or some such and a set of 12s on it. All were worthy instruments, albeit on the weighty side.

    A couple of friends have or had the Deluxes with the mini-hums and they sounded great.

    Hard to go wrong with a decent LP.

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    I was just going through some things I have not listed for sale yet and came across a player’s grade Les Paul classic that I had completely forgotten about. It just needs some clean up before I sell it. It has honest play wear, but is very nice. I’d make someone a good deal on it if anyone is interested.

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    I think you said that you're a jazz player, so if you've been playing an archtop, a LP might feel uncomfortable seated due to the weight being concentrated in a small area. Personally, and FWIW, if I were going to go back to playing rock and blues (not likely to happen), I'd probably look for a nice SG instead.

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Check out the FGN (Fujigen) brand ... great guitars .... impeccable finish and neck...low price!

    FGN Fujigen NLS30GFMBF Neo Classic Guitar, Granadillo Fretboard, Vintage Violin https://reverb.com/item/35755586-fgn...ntent=35755586

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    This one is more interesting than the other SB59 video by Daryl:


  40. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    I think you said that you're a jazz player, so if you've been playing an archtop, a LP might feel uncomfortable seated due to the weight being concentrated in a small area. Personally, and FWIW, if I were going to go back to playing rock and blues (not likely to happen), I'd probably look for a nice SG instead.
    im not quite sure upI understand the logic here... are you suggesting the SG is better due to more weight in the neck?

    that said, I do love SGs...

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MHoranzy
    im not quite sure upI understand the logic here... are you suggesting the SG is better due to more weight in the neck?
    No, less weight in the body!

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by powerwagonjohn
    I haven't played my Les Paul since I bought a 1971 Guild M-75. It's a solid mahogany body with two HB-1 pick ups and a nice fat neck. These are fairly inexpensive and great players. Check one out before you buy a Les Paul.

    Thanks John
    I've wanted a Guild M-75 or Blues Bird ever since I heard Larry Carlton's 'Blues Bird' which was played on a Guild. Used prices for USA made Guilds have increased quite a bit recently.


  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    If i were ever to buy a les paul it would be this one. No question.
    Les Paul Recommendations please?-schermafbeelding-2020-10-27-om-20-27-27-jpg

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    Hamer Studio! Really awesome guitars and gets close to Les Paul territory. I have an early 90’s made in the USA! Can be had for around 1K


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    If i were ever to buy a les paul it would be this one. No question.
    Les Paul Recommendations please?-schermafbeelding-2020-10-27-om-20-27-27-jpg
    Why the DC and ES Les Paul models never gained traction I'll never figure out. They're also the only "standard" models that prices hover at or near affordability.

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    Besides that, the DC's are way more beautifull.

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI
    Why the DC and ES Les Paul models never gained traction I'll never figure out. They're also the only "standard" models that prices hover at or near affordability.

    Yeah .. The ES-Les Paul's ended getting blown out at pretty cheap prices .. Only lasted a couple of years. Extremely light weight too.

    I'm dunno .. "Neither bird nor fish" which is a literal translation from my native tongue. The LP vs. ES335 esthetic is strong and the ES-Les Paul was neither?

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    Besides that, the DC's are way more beautifull.
    Many players get stuck in a tradition rut, in general...

    A thick hollowbody MUST have one cut.
    A Semi MUST have TWO cuts.
    A solid Gibson MUST have one cut
    The head MUST be open book (no snake head, hockey sticks allowed)
    No volutes!

    So many arcane visual rules for makers to try and overcome...

    It's not only guitars, A friend who rides a Harley went on about air cooled engines being "Traditional" and I asked" Why not kick starters, drum brakes, a carburettor, chain and distributor" No answer :-)

  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    My pick has been an epiphone elitist Les Paul for the past decade or so. Failing that? Maybe a heritage or Eastman if I were shopping today. A Gibson would be a distant fourth or fifth, depending on the price, weight, construction (Swiss cheese or chambers) and if I can get my hands on it first or not.

    My "not exactly" suggestion would be a gretsch jet of some kind, or perhaps even a guild aristocrat/blues bird.

  50. #49
    I had a black eighties Aria for about 700$ that was pretty nice! Could have used better pickups.