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  1. #1

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    I just wanted to let forum members know about a new 2.0 mm 351-shaped casein pick that D’Addario just recently introduced to the market: Casein 351 Standard Pick | Accessories | D'Addario. I received mine in the mail yesterday and found it to have a very pleasing warm tone similar to the D’Andrea Pro-Plek models. I read somewhere that this pick has characteristics similar to real tortoiseshell. I have only had limited experience with tortoiseshell picks so I can’t weigh in on the comparison. It’s easy to grip and I have enjoyed using it so far with my archtop guitars. It does seem to be ever so slightly brighter than the Pro-Plek 351 I have been playing, but I probably couldn’t tell the difference in a blind A/B listening test. At $21.99 USD, it’s quite a bit more money than the D’Andrea picks, but not as expensive as the boutique picks like Blue Chip.

    I’d be interested in hearing from anyone else who has tried the new pick and their impressions.

    Thanks!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    It's a pity that they only have it available in 2.00mm. I've been playing a Blue Chip TD60 (1mm) for years, and would love to see some competition in that market.&nbsp;<br>

  4. #3

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    looks interesting..thanks for heads up

    as per 2mm..once the tip begins to take to the shape of your playing style, the difference in thickness (where your fingers hold) matters less...

    picks make a world of difference..but not always in the way you'd expect the most

    live it up!

    cheers

  5. #4

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    Peter Nicholson-TritonePicks on etsy- of Bath, UK offers the nicest handmade casein picks for sale at prices lower than D'addario's. Send him a message on etsy and let him know what you want. He makes them in different gauges.

    TritonePicks on Etsy

  6. #5

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    I've read the description and the price tag...

    The description say it is good for bluegrass, acoustic, electric. I understand it is a super duper versatile so the whole world should buy it, but as a general experience, if I am serious and I need a screwdriver, I would look for a really good one, and not for a versatile tool which is a srewdriver and a hammer in one. (I mean I would like to play jazz. If something is good for too many things, my experience it is not good enough to do either, it is good for nothing.)

    The other marketing sentence which stinks a bit is the "right handed playing edge"... so is there a left handed model? Do we need to hold the pick its title up, what if I hold the pick upside down? and what about Benson picking?

    I know the Search for the Holy Pick, but if we really investigate into this topic, we must conclude that the majority of great sounding heroes were and are using ordinary picks.

  7. #6

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    Trying these because I liked the sound of the casein picks made by John Pearse but hated the thumb cutout. Also going to give the Thiel sig model a try. 1.4mm large triangle.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive
    It's a pity that they only have it available in 2.00mm. I've been playing a Blue Chip TD60 (1mm) for years, and would love to see some competition in that market.&nbsp;<br>
    Here is an 1.4 version. It titled as mandolin, but if the shape fits, maybe worth a try. Btw the price is nothing but competetive :-)

    D'Addario 2CA7-01CT Chris Thile Signature Casein 1.4mm Mandolin Pick | Sweetwater

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive
    It's a pity that they only have it available in 2.00mm. I've been playing a Blue Chip TD60 (1mm) for years, and would love to see some competition in that market.&nbsp;<br>
    Not sure what compelled them to offer a 2.0 mm pick in this material, Jonathan. I can’t imagine it’s a popular pick thickness. My go-to is usually a 1.0 to 1.5 mm maximum. As others noted, they offer a 1.4 mm casein mandolin pick in a larger shape. Perhaps, they will eventually come out with other sizes and thicknesses in the future. Not an inexpensive pick, but less expensive than the Blue Chips.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    I've read the description and the price tag...

    The description say it is good for bluegrass, acoustic, electric. I understand it is a super duper versatile so the whole world should buy it, but as a general experience, if I am serious and I need a screwdriver, I would look for a really good one, and not for a versatile tool which is a srewdriver and a hammer in one. (I mean I would like to play jazz. If something is good for too many things, my experience it is not good enough to do either, it is good for nothing.)

    The other marketing sentence which stinks a bit is the "right handed playing edge"... so is there a left handed model? Do we need to hold the pick its title up, what if I hold the pick upside down? and what about Benson picking?

    I know the Search for the Holy Pick, but if we really investigate into this topic, we must conclude that the majority of great sounding heroes were and are using ordinary picks.
    I would agree with you about questioning a claim about something being so versatile for all applications. It’s like my hybrid bicycle. Is it really great for riding on both paved and gravel roads? Well, not really. It is a compromise that you may or may not be willing to live with, depending on where you use it most, your budget and how much storage space you have.

    I would say D’Addario’s claim is somewhat hyped in order to drive sales up in all sectors. But I found the pick works well for the style of jazz that I enjoy playing, which is chord melody on an amplified archtop guitar. YMMV. Not sure why they put a right handed bevel on it rather than just leaving it alone.

    And, it is true that the majority of our guitar heroes are using inexpensive, ordinary picks. The search for the Holy Grail pick is just another tone chasing exercise, but can be fun and interesting. I thought it was worth trying it out and enjoy using it, but will be using my D’Andrea 1.5 mm Pro-Pleks most of the time.

  11. #10

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    Meanwhile I did my homework on casein, I did not recognized so far that it is a special material, although I did know about Blue Chip, and I am over of literally hundred of pick in my search...

    So looking for casein, I discovered Hense, but also no so competitive, and some models are right handed...


    Hense Plecs Speciality Picks – Thomann UK

  12. #11

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    clayton has some protein picks that also mimic tortoiseshell...and come in 3 gauges...starting at 1mm...

    clayton nutone protein pick...and at around 5$ per pick




    cheers

  13. #12

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    Man with picks that expensive and "supposedly" sounding like real tortoise shell, those road kill turtles I often see are starting to look more like a commodity than buzzard food :-)

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    Meanwhile I did my homework on casein, I did not recognized so far that it is a special material, although I did know about Blue Chip, and I am over of literally hundred of pick in my search...

    So looking for casein, I discovered Hense, but also no so competitive, and some models are right handed...


    Hense Plecs Speciality Picks – Thomann UK
    Gabor, Thanks for bringing the Hense casein picks to our attention. Looks like there’s quite a nice selection from Thomann. Artisan Guitars in Nashville, TN, USA, carries some of the Hense Happy Turtle picks, as well as the John Pearse casein picks: Picks – Artisan Guitars. The Henses cost just slightly less than the D’Addarios, and the John Pearse picks are around $10 USD.

  15. #14

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    Here’s a review of the Hense Happy Turtle picks by Tony Polecastro in one of his Acoustic Life TV posts: Hense Guitar Pick Review - Acoustic Life.

  16. #15

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    I wonder how similar a Hense cream speedy pick is to a Blue Chip. Says it's made from 'modern self lubricating plastic'. Suppose for $20 I'll have to try one of those as well. The big triangle Blue Chips stay home since I lost one playing out. (edit: started to buy one from Artisan Guitars but was put off by the $8.42 shipping on a $19.99 guitar pick. So maybe some other time.)

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Spook410
    I wonder how similar a Hense cream speedy pick is to a Blue Chip. Says it's made from 'modern self lubricating plastic'. Suppose for $20 I'll have to try one of those as well. The big triangle Blue Chips stay home since I lost one playing out. (edit: started to buy one from Artisan Guitars but was put off by the $8.42 shipping on a $19.99 guitar pick. So maybe some other time.)
    Sorry about the shipping on our website. That is a Flat Rate Box rate as these picks do crack so can't just go in an envelope.

    We can do first class mail in padded envelope if you call us at the store - 615-595-2544.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellie@Artisan
    Sorry about the shipping on our website. That is a Flat Rate Box rate as these picks do crack so can't just go in an envelope.

    We can do first class mail in padded envelope if you call us at the store - 615-595-2544.
    ...well I should call this first class customer care..., congrats

  19. #18

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    D'Addario Casein picks arrived today from Sweetwater. They are nicely made and polished. Attractive material. Has the sound I've always liked with casein.. defined and smooth. Could be an alternative to Blue Chip picks. In any case, I do like these.

    It's interesting to note that you won't be getting thin/flex picks in casein. Apparently it's a very stiff and somewhat brittle material. Also I understand that you have to be a little careful about getting it wet for extended periods. May not fare well left in your jeans pocket going through the laundry?

    I do wish the D'Addario Theil 1.4mm triangle was available in the 2mm material. The Theil model is nice but I like even thicker large triangle picks and this material maps well to that preference in sound and feel.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellie@Artisan
    Sorry about the shipping on our website. That is a Flat Rate Box rate as these picks do crack so can't just go in an envelope.

    We can do first class mail in padded envelope if you call us at the store - 615-595-2544.
    Thank you for letting us know about the lowest priced shipping option, Ellie. Much appreciated!

  21. #20

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    FWIW, the Blue Chip 60 picks are .060", which is a little more than 1.5mm. The Blue Chip 40 is very slightly more than 1mm.

  22. #21

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    https://artisanguitars.com/collections/picks-1

    Hense CASEIN / Milkstone picks

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    FWIW, the Blue Chip 60 picks are .060", which is a little more than 1.5mm. The Blue Chip 40 is very slightly more than 1mm.
    My overall favorite guitar pick is a Blue Chip TAD-1R 100. 2.5mm and $75 a pop. Surprised how good the casein material sounds in comparison. May check to see if I can have a 3mm large triangle made by the source Jabberwocky mentioned.