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  1. #1

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    Dear Jazzers,

    Recently, I got a bunch of old photos from relatives and came across a young man playing an archtop. This guy was probably my Grand-Pa brother and he died much before my birth. Could some one help me identify what archtop it could be?

    Help me identify this old archtop-archtop-unidentified-jpg

    All the clues I have:
    - My family lived in Italian Piemont (40 km from Torino). It's not too far from Austria and Bavarian alps (german luthiers ?).
    - My Grand-Pa was born in 1886. I have no idea when this picture was taken. Before or after world war 1 ?

    Could it be a Framus or an Este, or something like that ?

    Thanks a million.

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  3. #2

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    I swear the headstock logo looks a little bit like Gibson. I can't quite make it out, though, even zoomed in as far as I can go. But it doesn't look like anything close to the names you mentioned.

  4. #3

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    Radiotone?

  5. #4

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    To me, period rather than make is intriguing. Impeccable crease in the trousers. F-hole archtops were supposedly uncommon if non-existent before the 1930s. But do we see any holes in the photo? The peghead with the thick, white whatevers looks like from a far newer classical guitar. The bridge is broad for a floating one. Fine bindings, confusing fret markers. The other guitar in the photo, with its slanted-end fretboard, gives a further clue. However, due to the WW II halting everything, '30s to early '50s are hard to tell apart.

  6. #5

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    I see f holes, at least on the bass side, when zoomed in. It's hard to see, but it's there. It's a very wide bridge base, and at first I thought it was a standard flat-top bridge, but there is a tailpiece. I can't tell whether the top is arched, but it's definitely an f-hole type with floating bridge. Beyond that, I haven't a clue. The headstock logo seems to start with a G, and perhaps ends with go, but I can't be sure. I tried saving the image and blowing it up, and also using a magnifying glass on the unzoomed image, but I can't make out the logo name. My knowledge of early European guitars is nil, and of American guitars very limited, so I hesitate to speculate more.

  7. #6

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    Millions thanks for your help,

    Just to make it clear, my guess is that the photo was made in Italian Piemont or possibly on the other side of the Alps, on the French part (near a city called Volx). That's where my family was settled at that time.

    As for the period the photo was taken, I really don't know. First half of XXs century that the best I can guess. I will inquire to my relatives, I have an old cousin who's passed 90s and she might well know something.

    I was also temped to read something like Gibson on the headstock, but it is almost impossible. Gibson instruments wouldn't be accessible for farmers and workers in Europe at that time. Even later in the 60's for musicians living in Paris, Gibsons were extremely hard to get.

    The archtop might also have been crafted by some local factory...

    Again, many thanks.
    Last edited by Fred Archtop; 08-10-2020 at 04:22 PM.

  8. #7

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    Hi Fred,
    That region in the world is one of the most prolific for Building Stringed Instruments.
    A dear friend of mine grew up on that region in the 1940's. For centuries, His ancestors worked in the Violin building villages near Cremona. There are literally thousands of Luthiers who's families worked in the violin factories since the 1500's. You may be looking at a picture of a guitar built by one of those families.
    Ironically, my father told me although that we are actually mostly Napolitano but we are also partly Piedmontese..
    We might be related Freddy!
    Joe D

  9. #8

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    What would jazz guitar be without Italians and Italian-Americans, both as builders and players?

  10. #9

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    Help me identify this old archtop-archtop-unidentified-jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    What would jazz guitar be without Italians and Italian-Americans, both as builders and players?
    Jazz guitar would have developed just fine without the Italians and Italian-Americans. While a handful of important Italian-American builders helped advance and evolve the form, they are not central to its origins. As well, plenty of folks from other cultures have also advanced the form. I'm unaware of any significant archtop guitar-building
    based in Italy prior to the 1960s.

    The modern archtop guitar, as developed by Gibson, and subsequently popularized by Gibson and Epiphone in the 1930s, had very little traction in Europe. But their guitars were seen at trade shows, and a few builders and distributors became interested in the 1930s, mostly in German-speaking parts of Europe, as well as a bit of activity in Nordic countries. Relatively inexpensive archtops were developed by Hofner, who built instruments mostly for export, mostly to the UK.
    Otmar Windisch (Otwin) made some higher-end as well as inexpensive archtops, heavily influenced by Epiphone designs. Felix Staerke (ESTE) made some higher-end instruments. Franz Hirsch made some higher-end instruments. In particular, he built for Wenzel Rossmeisl, who started up the Roger company in the 1930s and was a performing jazz guitarist with a passion for jazz and archtop guitars. These were all very small scale operations compared to Gibson and Epiphone in the US.

    As well, there is a rich history of European makers exporting complete instruments and parts all over the world, including to the US, where a variety of US distributors and wholesalers completed or resold instruments, including many guitars.

    The guitar in question exhibits various features that suggest German or more likely Czech origin, most likely built in the area around Schonbach in the later 1930s or (less likely) late 1940s. It looks quite elegant, with nice proportions. A few things to consider, some of which are guesswork, all of which are consistent with the likelihood of
    Czech/German origin:
    -the neck meets the body at the 14th fret;
    -the headstock is slotted, with classical-style rollers;
    -the inlays are sparse;
    -the end of the fretboard has rounded corners, and the fretboard generally appears to be fairly wide;
    -the fretboard appears to be elevated from the body;
    -the body appears to be @16" wide, or close;
    -the pickguard has a distinctive point as typically used on German archtop guitars. I'm not sure who designed it, but Hofner used it extensively.

    And, yeah, the wide bridge base is a bit of a head-scratcher.

    As far
    what jazz guitar be without Italian and Italian-American players, I'll take a pass on that speculation.

    Last edited by Hammertone; 08-18-2020 at 06:36 PM.

  11. #10

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    gibson started f hole archtops in 1922..under lloyd loar...l-5

    the headstock does look like it says gibson!...hah

    luck

    cheers

  12. #11

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    Thanks for all these invaluable inputs and comments !

    If I magnify the table of the archtop, I see clearly the holes but they do not seem f-shaped. Is it just me or what?

    Best to you.

  13. #12

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    Some old Italian brands:




    Judging from the logo that seems to start with a G (or C?) if it is Italian, there are several candidates:
    - Galanti
    - Gemelli
    - Gherson
    - Crucianelli

    (And there are probably more).

    But I agree with Hammertone that it has German (Bavarian) appointments.

  14. #13

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    Joe- We were in that area in Italy hiking in the Dolomites in August 2019. We passed near Cremona and hiked among many Italian spruce forests that often served as wood for soundboards for those Italian luthiers. It is a magical region. Was thinking of all of those guitars and violins that were built in that part of the world. There is a wonderful museum in Venice featuring instruments that were played in the centuries after Vivaldi (he spent most of his career in Venice) that include many lutes and very early guitars built in those areas too. To think this knowledge was passed down to a couple of luthiers in NYC that built the archtops that we love to dream about is really something.
    Dan

  15. #14

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    [QUOTE=Hammertone;1053637]Help me identify this old archtop-archtop-unidentified-jpg

    Jazz guitar would have developed just fine without the Italians and Italian-Americans. While a handful of important Italian-American builders helped advance and evolve the form, they are not central to its origins. ]

    My bad? I, apparently mistakenly, thought that D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Benedetto, Buscarino, Campellone, Marchione and a few others were Italian names. Did/do they just copy Gibsons, with no contribution of their own? Would classical violins have developed "just fine" without a few luthiers in Cremona? Advancing and evolving the form is of course central, but so is perfecting the craftmanship. As for players, the list is exceedingly long. Mind you, Joe Pass's last name was originally Passalaqua.




  16. #15

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    Hi Dan,
    That must have been a great trip and thanks for sharing that.
    Ronaldo Orlandoni is one of them. 85 years young and still going strong.
    He managed to set some time aside and become a professional Soccer player before he came to America to build guitars for KISS, Peter Frampton, Johnny Winters and Greg Allman. When I spend time with him, I feel its the closest I will come to an Angel in this lifetime.
    Thanks Dan.
    JD

  17. #16

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    [QUOTE=Gitterbug;1053898]
    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    Help me identify this old archtop-archtop-unidentified-jpg

    Jazz guitar would have developed just fine without the Italians and Italian-Americans. While a handful of important Italian-American builders helped advance and evolve the form, they are not central to its origins. ]

    My bad? I, apparently mistakenly, thought that D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Benedetto, Buscarino, Campellone, Marchione and a few others were Italian names. Did/do they just copy Gibsons, with no contribution of their own? Would classical violins have developed "just fine" without a few luthiers in Cremona? Advancing and evolving the form is of course central, but so is perfecting the craftmanship. As for players, the list is exceedingly long. Mind you, Joe Pass's last name was originally Passalaqua.

    Hahaaa..
    Gitterbug, I love both of your posts. Makes me proud. We didn't invent pasta either. We only perfected the use of it..

  18. #17

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    [QUOTE=Max405;1053903]
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug

    Hahaaa..
    Gitterbug, I love both of your posts. Makes me proud. We didn't invent pasta either. We only perfected the use of it..
    Corretto. A Marco Polo brought the pasta from China. But you (or was it Lee Iacocca's mom?) did invent pizza.

  19. #18

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    Now that we have almost solved the origin of this old archtop I'm glad this thread is turning into italian cooking...I visited Napoli 4 years ago. It was so much enjoyable. You can have a great meal for 2 euros by the streets: 1 € for a "pizza portafoglio" and 1 € for a nonetheless tasty "Baba o Rhum". My family originated from Piemonte and Tuscany but I was born in Marseille, south of France which looks like a Little Napoli. I'm sure my love for music comes from them.

    Be safe and take care.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    Jazz guitar would have developed just fine without the Italians and Italian-Americans. While a handful of important Italian-American builders helped advance and evolve the form, they are not central to its origins.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    My bad? I, apparently mistakenly, thought that D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Benedetto, Buscarino, Campellone, Marchione and a few others were Italian names. Did/do they just copy Gibsons, with no contribution of their own? Would classical violins have developed "just fine" without a few luthiers in Cremona? Advancing and evolving the form is of course central, but so is perfecting the craftmanship. As for players, the list is exceedingly long. Mind you, Joe Pass's last name was originally Passalaqua

    You are not mistaken in that the list you provided is indeed of Italian names.

    Your comment regarding classical violins has nothing to do with the subject at hand. And, as far as players go, I typically demur regarding discussions of the "what if" kind when it comes to individual expressions of artistry.

    Back to the archtop guitar, most of these makers worked/work very much in the tradition of archtop guitar making, and made/make excellent acoustic archtop guitars, but their contributions to the design of the archtop guitar are not particularly consequential for the most part, IMO.
    They did indeed "copy" Gibson (and Epiphone), and their individual contributions as independent luthiers are based on the specific aesthetic appeal of their instruments as well as the quality of their work.

    I think that Jimmy D'Aquisto is the exception here - later in his life he began to incorporate some features that evolved the design of the archtop guitar. He stripped away much of the functionally meaningless decoration that had traditionally been associated with the instrument, but ended up adding his own functionally meaningless decoration. He investigated the effects of different soundhole designs, something that others had done as well. He popularized
    wood as a material for tailpieces. He developed different bridge designs, which have not been widely adopted.

    Other than that, these builders worked/work very much within the envelope of already developed, standard acoustic archtop design, and their well-deserved legacies are specifically based on the quality and excellence of their work.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 08-14-2020 at 05:58 PM.

  21. #20

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    Hi everybody
    I have been lurking for a while then it's time to take the plunge!
    When I saw Fred's photo, it reminded me something i had in my documents.

    Attachment 74736

    And that's what i found

    I had registered it (wrongly?) as Miroglio (an early sicilian luthier as Carmelo Catania or Calace) but seems very Markneukirchen style . It was probably from an auction in Bonhams London .Anyway there have been some relationship between luthiers in Europe as you can see in the very well made site Fetishguitars

    Monzino - Garlandini - Fetishguitars.com

    Carlo Monzino from Milano was in apprenticeship in Mirecourt and Markneukirchen in the late 1920s.

    So is this guitar italian made, or imported and sold in northern Italy as were Colettis and Radiotones in UK ?

  22. #21

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    Tuck Andress trying out a 7-string archtop? Nopes, Martin Marais, French viola da gamba virtuoso, in a painting from 1704. While there's no question about Orville Gibson's seminal importance in the evolution, and commercial success, of the archtop guitar, his first and only patent from 1896 - for mandolin, not guitar- was not the only one in the period. I'm inclined to think that the resulting step change was not as much within luthiery - carrying carved tops from the violin family to mandolins and guitars - as in making use of patent legislation in the spirit of the day.

    Other makers would have been free to copy Gibson's design from 1916 onwards, and probably did, but guitar was a marginal orchestra instrument then. It took more than a decade, and Lloyd Loar's introduction of the f-holes, for the archtop guitar to defeat the banjo as the main harmonic rhythm instrument.

    Did Gibson ever try to patent the f-holes for a guitar? A carryover from the violin family similar to the arched top. If yes, they were unsuccessful. Otherwise, when the halcyon days of the acoustic archtop started around 1930, Gibson would have been alone in the game.

    As a further thought: It was the evolution and viral spread of jazz, a truly American contribution to popular music, that made luthiers the world over to develop their own lines of archtop guitars in a very short span of time. No way they all had access to Gibson's blueprints. The music and the instrument were a perfect match, and electrification opened a new, soloistic role for the guitar. All this during a decade marred by the Great Depression at start and the outbreak of WWII towards the end.

    Apologies for digressing from the thread's main theme. And more apologies if all this has been dealt with ad nauseam in previous threads.
    Last edited by Gitterbug; 08-13-2020 at 07:06 AM. Reason: Further speculation

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFranck
    ...When I saw Fred's photo, it reminded me something i had in my documents.
    ...So is this guitar italian made, or imported and sold in northern Italy as were Colettis and Radiotones in UK ?
    Welcome. This guitar is unquestionably from the same maker as that posted above. Most likely Bohemian.
    Attached Images Attached Images Help me identify this old archtop-mystery-archtop-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 08-13-2020 at 12:58 PM.

  24. #23

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    Yes but look:

    :Help me identify this old archtop-carbonell-archtop-36-1-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-carbonell-archtop-36-4-jpg
    this guitar is dated from 1936
    Arturo Carbonell went from Valencia (Spain) and opened his workshop in Marseille around 1920
    He built a lot of highly regarded classical guitars and some Selmer style and archtops .

  25. #24

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    Dear all,

    @JFranck: great pictures and input! So the guitar of my ancester might well have been built in Marseille. As I wrote before, part of my family was in Italian Piedmont whereas the other had already imigrated in France (Volx, French Alps), and I don't know if the photo was taken in Italy or France. From your pictures, I believe the photo was taken in the French Alps, a region clearly under the influence of the local capital Marseille situated more in the south. So this guitar was probably bought to this luthier in Marseille and used in Volx...

    @Hammertone: you're so much more than an hofnerologist! Thanks for your invaluable pieces of information.

  26. #25

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    Fred : just a possibility ! but your uncle's guitar looks a lot like this one Help me identify this old archtop-miroglio-guitar-jpg
    typicaly reminiscent of a Mitteleuropa guitar sold in UK !

  27. #26

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    Wow, those 2 are really close!
    Especially the last one. This is getting interesting.
    JD

  28. #27

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    Interesting. Looks like all three of these came from the same place. The one with candy cane binding has the Carbonell label, but it's not like other Carbonell guitars of the time, though. My best guess is still that Carbonell père didn't make it, but bought it from one of the Bohemian makers, who built a lot of instruments for export to distributors and retailers under different brand names. 1936 is early days for archtop guitars in Europe - Hofner and Otwin come to mind as potential suppliers, but this looks more Otwin to me. It's all edumacated guesswork, IMO. More research required...

    Here's a higher-end '30s Otwin by comparison.
    Attached Images Attached Images Help me identify this old archtop-carbonell-archtopx3-png Help me identify this old archtop-otwin-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 08-19-2020 at 12:50 PM.

  29. #28

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    Were these typically 16" laminates, pressed, carved?

  30. #29

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    Pre-war, the better ones had carved or solid pressed tops.
    Not sure about the backs, but I'll bet most are laminated.
    Otwin also made some all-laminated ones.

  31. #30

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    Hi!
    Interesting research. I’m chiming-in because I’m the actual owner of the Carbonell guitar from the photos.
    Info I can share with you now is that fretboard inlays are not original, somebody added them at some point.
    Headstock is fully original with these nylon roller tuners and interesting inlays. Fretboard seems ebony and its exceptionally wide: it measures 48mm at zero fret.
    Guitar is now at my luthier’s ‘cause somebody was interested in buying it and I left it there to try it but if it doesn’t sell and somebody is interested in photos or measurements I can do it when I get it back.

  32. #31

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    Pix of the back, the neck heel, the back of the headstock, edges of the f-holes, please.

  33. #32

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    I am just digging the whole vibe of Fred Archtop's grandfather's guitar, and it's apparent siblings.
    Last edited by Cunamara; 08-14-2020 at 10:07 PM. Reason: Fixing typical voice to text typos

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by foner
    Hi!
    Interesting research. I’m chiming-in because I’m the actual owner of the Carbonell guitar from the photos.
    Info I can share with you now is that fretboard inlays are not original, somebody added them at some point.
    Headstock is fully original with these nylon roller tuners and interesting inlays. Fretboard seems ebony and its exceptionally wide: it measures 48mm at zero fret.
    Guitar is now at my luthier’s ‘cause somebody was interested in buying it and I left it there to try it but if it doesn’t sell and somebody is interested in photos or measurements I can do it when I get it back.
    have you any information on the history of this guitar ?

  35. #34

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    Hi folks,

    Did anybody of the contributers here already read this book:

    Bohemian Jazz Guitars Tribute

    Please see here:
    Bohemian Jazz Guitars Tribute

    My recommendation: get it, read it and then come back. These guys did an excellent in-depth research on the topic, the book is packed with info and top grade photography!

    In short: all the guitars in question are clearly made in Schönbach (or at least in a workshop nearby).

    The "Carbonell": the headstock overlay couldn´t be more "Schönbach". You find this guitar under various brand names. Carbonell was only the dealer in this case - not the maker.

    As most of this stuff was made for export a good part sported Italian (sounding) names to suggest traditional old school lutherie.

    Best known is the "Martin Coletti" brand of the British importer Dallas. Others are:
    - Cantonella
    - Carlo Moreno
    - Cerlino
    - Francotta
    - Guiseppe

    These guitars are either carved or laminated - no pressed into shape solid tops at this time.
    Lamination was done in a specific way - would take me too far to explain - as said: read The Book!

  36. #35

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    Yes - I did remember correctly: I saw this extra wide bridge base before:

    Help me identify this old archtop-dixie_01_01-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-dixie_01_02-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-dixie_01_04-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-dixie_01_05-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-dixie_01_09-jpg

    This time an example with an English sounding name.
    Interessting part here is the stamp on the back of the head: "Made in Czechoslovakia"

    There are a couple of brand names giving an American flavour:

    - Avalon
    - Bell-Tone
    - Clou
    - Dixie
    - Ed Lang
    - Gilson
    - Majestic
    - Premier
    - Radiotone
    - Ridgmount
    - Tuxedo
    .....

    All of them "Bohemian Jazz guitars"!

  37. #36

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    Here 2 more samples of Schönbach made guitars from the late 30ies with the extra wide bridge base:

    Help me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_02_03-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_02_04-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_02_09-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_02_14-jpg

    and:

    Help me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_21_02-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_21_03-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_21_08-jpg

    And yes: slotted headstock combined with an archtop body was a very common feature of this era. (at least for the Czech made stuff)

  38. #37

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    And one more; again with a slotted headstock:

    Help me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_29_01-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_29_02-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_29_04-jpgHelp me identify this old archtop-schonbach_nn_29_09-jpg

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by alteklampfe
    Hi folks,

    Did anybody of the contributers here already read this book:

    Bohemian Jazz Guitars Tribute


    Please see here:
    Bohemian Jazz Guitars Tribute

    My recommendation: get it, read it and then come back. These guys did an excellent in-depth research on the topic, the book is packed with info and top grade photography!

    In short: all the guitars in question are clearly made in Schönbach (or at least in a workshop nearby).

    The "Carbonell": the headstock overlay couldn´t be more "Schönbach". You find this guitar under various brand names. Carbonell was only the dealer in this case - not the maker.

    As most of this stuff was made for export a good part sported Italian (sounding) names to suggest traditional old school lutherie.

    Best known is the "Martin Coletti" brand of the British importer Dallas. Others are:
    - Cantonella
    - Carlo Moreno
    - Cerlino
    - Francotta
    - Guiseppe

    These guitars are either carved or laminated - no pressed into shape solid tops at this time.
    Lamination was done in a specific way - would take me too far to explain - as said: read The Book!
    Wow, I will buy this book!

    Thanks for the great input.

    Cheers.

  40. #39

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    What's in a (brand) name or label?
    Yes, the probability is very high that the guitar shown by the OP was made in Schönbach/Bohemia, possibly in the late 1930s.


    As early as the end of the 19th century, the instruments produced in Schönbach were not only being sold on the domestic Austrian-Hungarian market, but were also being sold to neighboring countries Russia, the Balkans, via Trieste to Italy, and via Hamburg to overseas territories. The most important foreign customer, however, was Markneukirchen in Germany, from where Schönbach instruments (and components) were delivered by local retailers or exporters to all countries in the world.
    In 1906 the productive cooperative of musical instrument makers was founded in Schönbach, mainly with the aim of expanding exports without that "detour" via Markneukirchen. Of course, the results of the First World War and the Great Depression from 1929 to 1932 had negative impacts on the production numbers in Schönbach.

    The official Czech statistics for 1937 show 89,227 plucked instruments produced; a specialist like Josef Höfner estimated the number of guitars to be 45,000 to 50,000. Unfortunately, there is no longer any information about the proportion of archtop guitars. 26 percent of these guitars went to the USA, 13.5 percent to the German Reich, 10.3 percent to Great Britain.

    For comparison: in 1937, more than seven times this number of guitars were made in the USA. In 1939, Schönbach had a population of 4,269 (among them Czechs less than 100), the USA approx. 130 millions. Nevertheless, among the pre-WWII Schönbach guitar makers were some excellently qualified people, which was primarily due to a kind of early form of dual education system.

  41. #40

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    Thanks to Altekampfe and Ol'Fret for all these informations .
    By the way, what about the "European Guitar" forum ? I still miss it.

  42. #41

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    I started the European Guitar forum and ran it for several years as its Moderator. An un-named person was its Adminstrator. He assassinated it without consulting anyone and will presumably be consigned to a suitable spot in Dante's Inferno for this sin, among his many other sins. I do have bits and pieces of it in storage.

    "But, other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    I started the European Guitar forum and ran it for several years as its Moderator. An un-named person was its Adminstrator. He assassinated it without consulting anyone and will presumably be consigned to a suitable spot in Dante's Inferno for this sin, among his many other sins. I do have bits and pieces of it in storage.

    "But, other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"

    Yes, yes, one day Dante's Lake Cocytus will be overcrowded!
    On the other hand: Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    I started the European Guitar forum and ran it for several years as its Moderator. An un-named person was its Adminstrator. He assassinated it without consulting anyone and will presumably be consigned to a suitable spot in Dante's Inferno for this sin, among his many other sins. I do have bits and pieces of it in storage.

    "But, other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"
    Too bad !
    Anyway it seems that there is a strong interest for european guitars on this forum ?

  45. #44

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    I’ve heard so Much about this forum and I’ve even read fragments of it through the Internet Archive! Such a shame to find a forum I’d have loved to join and to know it’s gone...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFranck
    Too bad!Anyway it seems that there is a strong interest for european guitars on this forum?
    Quote Originally Posted by xavierbarcelo
    I’ve heard so Much about this forum and I’ve even read fragments of it through the Internet Archive! Such a shame to find a forum I’d have loved to join and to know it’s gone...
    There are several related facebook forums as well.
    And several decent websites.

    A few of us have resurfaced on this forum, which is fine by me.
    I think it's a great place for discussion of European archtop guitars, because it provides the opportunity for a bunch of folks who are interested in the well-known American and custom archtops to learn about the parallel universe of European archtop builders, from crapalicious factory guitars to spectacular hand-built masterpieces.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 08-19-2020 at 05:47 PM.