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  1. #1

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    I mean, c'mon, we're plugged in, they're more comfy. Pretty much the same tone. It's not like we're trying to project acoustically through the Stan Kenton band anymore.
    Last edited by Woody Sound; 07-07-2020 at 12:56 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Same work, less money?

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Same work, less money?
    Just charge the same, if it's what someone wants.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Same work, less money?
    I doubt if they're less money. The Sadowsky LS-15 is $5300. The Lee Ritenour L5 which was 15.5" was about $9,000 new. I just think the idea of a 15" body size is fairly new to the jazz world and production changes move slower than customer needs. When we started to build 15" guitars around 2010 (?) I couldn't even find cases for them.

  6. #5

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    Sadowsky, Benedetto Bambino 14", Stephan Holst, Frans Elferink, Ribbeke, Zimniki, Sonntag, Victor Baker, Eastman, Westville Japan, Gibson Lee Ritenour L-5C and Gibson Modern Archtop there are 2 of those for under $3k at Davesguitars.com at the moment.

    That should be a good start to get you going. Good luck!

  7. #6

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    It's interesting to see that while the majority of white western males is getting taller with every half generation the idea of smaller guitars is spreading- not only re archtops but also a rather sudden increase in parlor-sized acoustics has taken place, even from the major manufacturers.
    For my part I'm a big guy and feel absolutely at home with my Super-400 + Super Eagle, both perched on a stool or sitting in a chair. My 16" Trenier is more comfy when I'm standing but with a 15" I would have bend over some while sitting plus my right arm would be a somewhat awkward
    position - I'd have to have it suspended on a strap the whole time.

  8. #7
    The majority of the guitar is not a player's market, it's a collectors market. In the collector's world, the L-5 and Super 400 are the supreme objects of drool. To a fantasy player (collector) the guitar is a way to get closer to the myth and mystique of the jazz fantasy.
    Back in the day, the big bands set the standards for builders. They build big for a big sound. Those instruments, designed big for big air movement were also the available instruments for any solo player, small group player or contemporary player who wanted a quality instrument. Those players defined utility and collectibility. Over time, they became the standard because that size occupied the top echelons of quality builders.
    Until George Benson specifically requested a smaller instrument, they were unheard of and unbuilt.
    For a player, the function determines the sale.
    For the fantasy player, the tradition and mystique determines the object you save up for and acquire.
    A whole lot more armchair fantasy consumers driving the trends than players invested enough to commission a small body guitar. It's not popular and they're not easy to find. Too, for a student who doesn't know enough to know what they need to play better, the word of others is the way many will go. Magazines and articles are full of stories of players who have big guitars and big reputations. Big guitar is the stuff of legend.
    Plus most guys want a bigger one. If your life choice means having it is more of a reality than using it, then start with big and that's your best shot at sharing a legacy.

  9. #8

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    It's a niche market, but Stephen Marchione has had a unique 15" archtop design in production for well over a decade



    PK

  10. #9

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    I'm more or less average size, and guitars less than 16" cause me to hunch more than I like. OTOH, those that are 3" or more in depth are uncomfortable. My comfort zone is 16" or 17" and 2.75" or less in depth. 18" is too big. I realize this limits my choices, but there are still more than enough available. I think guitar size is a very subjective subject, and that's fine, because there is something available for everyone. Guitars with 15" bouts are far from rare, if you look around.

  11. #10

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    The smaller the body, the less acoustic projection. The less of this, the less difference between cheap and expensive materials, as long as the build and electronics are decent. Ibanez has made budget-priced small-body archtops for a long time. AG 75, for example, has a 14.5" body width. This is a zone where partly hollowed solidbodies (LP ES, PRS) and 339 clones also figure. No shortage of choices, unless you insist on paying several thousands for a handmade guitar of uncertain resale/collector value.

  12. #11

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    As noted above, Ibanez makes several hollowbody models at or under 15". While none of them are carved archtops, they still function quite well amplified with minimal feedback issues.

    The most common are the GB10 (14 3/4"), LGB30 (15 3/4"), PM2 (15 3/4"), plus all of the non-signature variants of these models.

  13. #12

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    In my experience there is a world between a 15" Marchione/Victor Baker/Westville and a GB10.

  14. #13

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    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg

    I'm doing my part!!!

    As a short small guy who's gotten a lot older in the last 20 years, I love these guitars. They allow me to keep gigging and they look, sound, and feel like the guitars I played during the first part of my life.

    Danny W.

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg

    I'm doing my part!!!

    As a short small guy who's gotten a lot older in the last 20 years, I love these guitars. They allow me to keep gigging and they look, sound, and feel like the guitars I played during the first part of my life.

    Danny W.
    Which one of these is the 15"?
    They're proportioned like a 17", do they all have shorter scales too?

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevus
    In my experience there is a world between a 15" Marchione/Victor Baker/Westville and a GB10.
    Very true. However the OP only inquired about archtops in the15" body size.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Which one of these is the 15"?
    They're proportioned like a 17", do they all have shorter scales too?
    The one on the bottom row far left appears to be a Ritenour (actually 15.5 in the spec) and those are a 24.75" scale length. I don't know what the others are unless they're custom builds.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevus
    In my experience there is a world between a 15" Marchione/Victor Baker/Westville and a GB10.
    You're quite right when we're talking about the acoustic tone, the dynamic response and the price - in respect to the stage-worthyness, the build quality and the playability the differences
    diminish rapidly and come down to personal preference.
    Re the electric TONE I dare say that Benson's tone on stage is at least as nice and often BETTER than what I've heard from Mark Whitfield playing his Marchione.... YMMV

  19. #18

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    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Which one of these is the 15"?
    They're proportioned like a 17", do they all have shorter scales too?
    All those guitars are 15.5" x 2.625"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    The one on the bottom row far left appears to be a Ritenour (actually 15.5 in the spec) and those are a 24.75" scale length. I don't know what the others are unless they're custom builds.
    and all, including the Rit, have what Gibson calls a 25.5" scale, which actually measures out on my guitars at 25.25". The longer scale length is another reason I like them so much.

    All were part of Gibson's "L-5 Signature" line from the early 2000's.

    Danny W.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg



    All those guitars are 15.5" x 2.625"



    and all, including the Rit, have what Gibson calls a 25.5" scale, which actually measures out on my guitars at 25.25". The longer scale length is another reason I like them so much.

    All were part of Gibson's "L-5 Signature" line from the early 2000's.

    Danny W.
    I would've never guessed that those were 15.5". I hope you and all your Gibbies are doing okay in AZ.

  21. #20

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    I have the 15" x 1 11/16" deep (yup, that's not a typo! some guitar nuts are wider than this guitar is deep!) Collings Eastside Jazz LC. It doesn't sound as "full bodied" as larger 16 x 3" instruments, but the difference is not very much. Acoustically it's quite shocking how loud this little Collings is...in fact it's louder acoustically than most 16 x 3 laminate guitars you'll find. You can find some videos of "bear" (Jostein) comparing his 15" Eastside Jazz to his 16" regular Eastside - not much difference in sound, and I don't think the 16" sounds any "bigger" in those videos.

    I think if the 15" Collings Eastside Jazz had been around 50 or 60 years ago, a LOT of players would have been playing it instead of the venerable ES-175.

    While I like the 15" size especially while standing, overall I still prefer a 16". However like Danny W. I am a smaller fella and, in time, will notice the effects of ageing...hence the Collings is sticking around even after my 16" laminate Trenier arrives soon.

    I think Collings has really nailed the 15" laminate formula and in time I expect we'll see more and more players take up this size.

  22. #21

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    I love the looks of the Marchione, but I find his asking price a bit much for his guitars. But that's life, and you have to pay the entrance fee for certain things.

    I find that the Benedetto Bambino the best bang for the dollar, especially used.
    And Frans Elferink, Stephan Holst, and Mark Campellone the best for your money in carved top guitars.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg



    All those guitars are 15.5" x 2.625"



    and all, including the Rit, have what Gibson calls a 25.5" scale, which actually measures out on my guitars at 25.25". The longer scale length is another reason I like them so much.

    All were part of Gibson's "L-5 Signature" line from the early 2000's.

    Danny W.
    Awesome collection. That bottom row is mind-boggling.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57
    ... And Frans Elferink, Stephan Holst, and Mark Campellone the best for your money in carved top guitars.
    All fine builders whose pricing is accessible. Mark Campellone used to offer the EP model, and will still build one to order. It's like a Gibson L-4C (carved top, laminated back), but only 15" wide, and with a few options in terms of rim depth, nut width, trim, pickup configuration ond so forth.
    Attached Images Attached Images 15" Archtops - why not more of them?-campellone-ep-png 

  25. #24

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    I've had a 1981 GB10 for 34 years now, still a wonderful and versatile guitar. With a little knob and switch work, it covers a lot of tonal ground.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler
    Very true. However the OP only inquired about archtops in the15" body size.
    Well not necessarily exactly 15", just smaller than 16". Like in the 14.5-15.5 range.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg

    I'm doing my part!!!

    As a short small guy who's gotten a lot older in the last 20 years, I love these guitars. They allow me to keep gigging and they look, sound, and feel like the guitars I played during the first part of my life.

    Danny W.
    Oh no. Uh-oh. I didn't know L-5s with these specs existed. This is not good for my GAS.... I have always loved them but prefer 16" or smaller, and less than 3" in depth for my shoulder. My Benedetto bravo is perfect size for me. I have looked at the L-5 thinlines but thought they might be too thin.

  28. #27

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    I make semi-hollowbody guitars in 13.25, 14, 15 and 16" sizes and sales are strongest for the smallest and decrease as the size goes up.

    I also make 15, 16, 17 and 18" archotps. Here sales are strongest for 16 and 17" with 15 and 18" being low.

    I see that archtop customers are the most tradition bound. Semi-hollow buyers are a little more willing to step out. And of course solid body customers are even more willing. 15" archtops can sound really great, they just don't sound like and L5.

  29. #28

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    The Gibson 15" ES 275 model introduced several years back was driven by younger Japanese jazz players wanted something like it.
    As a hugh fan of 15" bodies, I immediately fell in love with this model. I owned 2 finish version.
    Cherry red and beautiful Montrex vintage burst. The Cherry finish was the plain Jane. The other was beautiful. But the cost for a veneer top on the burst, just didn't make sense to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    I mean, c'mon, we're plugged in, they're more comfy. Pretty much the same tone. It's not like we're trying to project acoustically through the Stan Kenton band anymore.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    I would've never guessed that those were 15.5". I hope you and all your Gibbies are doing okay in AZ.
    My big band usually shuts down in May for the summer. This year it was a couple of months early and we cancelled a number of big gigs. Our gym is closed and it’s getting too hot to walk in the morning. I’m playing at home every day, so the Gibsons are not being neglected, but like everyone these days, I’m about ready to scream.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    Awesome collection. That bottom row is mind-boggling.
    Thank you! I don’t consider it a collection so much as a nice selection of working guitars. The Rit is the closest thing I have to an acoustic—it and the other single pickup sunburst mostly stay at home. I use the two-pickup guitars for indoor concerts, while the red one is my workhouse, doing dances, outdoor shows and rehearsals.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie2
    Oh no. Uh-oh. I didn't know L-5s with these specs existed. This is not good for my GAS.... I have always loved them but prefer 16" or smaller, and less than 3" in depth for my shoulder. My Benedetto bravo is perfect size for me. I have looked at the L-5 thinlines but thought they might be too thin.
    Before I had these I mostly played 17” thinlines. They tended to be brighter and more open; the Signatures are darker and fuller, but all of them fall into the range of L-5 sounds.

    Danny W.
    Last edited by Danny W.; 07-08-2020 at 12:44 PM.

  31. #30
    There was a time when the smaller body was the standard size for Gibson archtops. My L-1 is an absolute joy to play and it's so comfortable. The sonic balance is closer to the voice of a classical than the mid/low end emphasis of the modern day jazz box.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-screen-shot-2020-07-08-1-06-23-pm-jpg15" Archtops - why not more of them?-screen-shot-2020-07-08-1-06-49-pm-jpg
    For small chamber groups and anything without a drummer, it's got an open sound with a really wood clarity I don't get on any other instrument.

  32. #31

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    I'm pretty sure most people here are not thinking about small bodied acoustic archtops....but good ones can sound wonderful in their own right and can fit nicely in the mix or as solo instruments.

    So appreciating the L-1 above.....thanks for your post. I had an L-3 once that had a voice that you described well.

    I've got this '33 Epiphone Zenith....13.75" at the lower bout, 25.5" scale and the most magical sounding upper mids and trebles. The low end is no great shakes but serviceable. But one makes the most of the strengths of a good instrument and nothing else I have does what this one can do.

    ....and it sounds pretty big with a DeArmond rig!

    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-77d6f3ea-1cf4-4c35-9ae7-d187e30657dd_1_201_a-jpg
    Last edited by zizala; 07-08-2020 at 06:25 PM.

  33. #32

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    For scale, here’s my 16” (it’s not 16.5”) Trenier next to my 15” Collings Eastside Jazz and Slaman Pauletta (Les Paul size).
    Attached Images Attached Images 15" Archtops - why not more of them?-14fd5588-aa5d-42bf-87da-387441944f6b-jpg 

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    For scale, here’s my 16” (it’s not 16.5”) Trenier next to my 15” Collings Eastside Jazz and Slaman Pauletta (Les Paul size).
    That Slaman! My pants just got tight!

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    That Slaman! My pants just got tight!
    Haha, yeah, and that pretty much sums up why I bought it. You should see her wearing a tune-a-matic bridge...it'll make your heart stop.

  36. #35

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    I just wish there were gigs to use all of these beautiful guitars on!

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-l-5-sig-collection-1-jpg



    All those guitars are 15.5" x 2.625"



    and all, including the Rit, have what Gibson calls a 25.5" scale, which actually measures out on my guitars at 25.25". The longer scale length is another reason I like them so much.

    All were part of Gibson's "L-5 Signature" line from the early 2000's.

    Danny W.
    Could you please tell me the model name/number of that one on the bottom left with the floater? I want to do some research (and create a reverb/ebay search LOL)

  38. #37

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    Not to crash your discussion, but I believe thats a Lee Ritenour L-5C Gibson. 15&1/2" width x 2&3/4" depth? There should be an archived page at gibson.com
    with all specs and pics.

  39. #38

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    9400111298370252107815 The Music Zoo in N.Y. has just listed a Gibson L-5ces Signature on there website $5.9k

  40. #39

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    Indeed... yowza! It's like a smaller Johnny Smith kind of, even has the JS pickup

    Gibson.com: Gibson Custom Lee Ritenour L-5
    Last edited by ruger9; 07-09-2020 at 09:28 PM.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57
    I just wish there were gigs to use all of these beautiful guitars on!
    Yeah, I've only bought a guitar if it will have some use on a gig coming up.
    The way things are going, it could be years before gigs return.
    Even jam sessions, big band rehearsals, etc... are out of the question. A desperate trumpet player friend of mine has went to two rehearsals for a nine-piece band he's part of, and he says it sucks, because you have to sit so far away from everyone, you can't hear anybody!
    Of course the rehearsals were held outside in one of the guys' backyard.

  42. #41

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    I've owned a bunch of handmade 17" archtops by highly respected makers, as well as nice Gibsons. I always wondered, "Why does it have to be so big?"


    Experience has shown me that 17" does not always sound "bigger" or have more bass response than 16" or even smaller. Here is a 15" archtop by Guillame Rancourt that uses some non-traditional methods of construction. Salvaged cedar top, Peruvian walnut back, braces are carved in to the top wood. Graphite reinforced neck, 3 1/4" depth.


    It's now my only acoustic archtop. I sold the others because I only wanted to play this one. It has a huge dynamic range, a sweet, rich tone, and it's so much easier to handle because of it's size.

    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-img_5037-jpg

    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-fn70ektv510dfskvyek6-jpg

  43. #42

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    [QUOTE=Gilpy;1046695]I've owned a bunch of handmade 17" archtops by highly respected makers, as well as nice Gibsons. I always wondered, "Why does it have to be so big?"


    Experience has shown me that 17" does not always sound "bigger" or have more bass response than 16" or even smaller. Here is a 15" archtop by Guillame Rancourt that uses some non-traditional methods of construction. Salvaged cedar top, Peruvian walnut back, braces are carved in to the top wood. Graphite reinforced neck, 3 1/4" depth.


    It's now my only acoustic archtop. I sold the others because I only wanted to play this one. It has a huge dynamic range, a sweet, rich tone, and it's so much easier to handle because of it's size.

    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-img_5037-jpg

    15" Archtops - why not more of them?-fn70ektv510dfskvyek6-jpg

    I posted on this a couple of weeks ago and have decided to move forward with commissioning a build from Guillaume Rancourt partially based on Giply's recommendation. He is now offering an entry level guitar based on the same model as Gilpy has but with less of the appointments. Guillaume has been great to work with and has answered multiple questions including 15' vs 16' and choice of tonewoods. I've primarily played 17' archtops but I'm confident the Concerto will not lose any of the range and responsiveness of a larger guitar. I'll find out in about 14 months.

    Standard Concerto Signature Acoustic Archtops – Rancourt Guitars

  44. #43

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    Wow, it must be very exciting to commission a new Rancourt! If you have the option, I’d strongly suggest that you get a sound port on the side. Makes a huge difference in sound from the player’s perspective.

  45. #44

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    Devoted 15" guy ...I think these days most players either migrated to archtops from solid body electrics or have to switch between them. My arm dynamics just adapt to the smaller body after decades of teles or strats or even 335's with the shallow depth.
    Depending on the builder's goal, the usual benefit of a 16, 17 inch is the deeper acoustic bass from the larger body.
    (All other things being equal)
    The transition from music before the 60's to music after the 60's has resulted in louder drummers and louder amplification. In the 50's it was string bass (often unamplified) and a 15-20 watt amp.
    Since then feedback has become an issue and my experience with full bodied archtops with a band often had me dialing down the bass on the amp to not get buried in the mix. Why 16,17" if I was dialing down the bass? I could get the EQ of the 15 into the amp without the struggle.
    If you can relate to this ... the 15" goes a long way to adapting the archtop sound to a modern setting.
    If I was to play my Monteleone (17") then all this gets thrown out the window because it feels and sounds like a Steinway. BUT ... Touring around 3 countries (pre pandemic) and hitting with some incredible but excitable drummers rendered the Monteleone useless. Even in duo the singer liked to be right next to me and she likes voice in the floor monitor.. I was getting that wooooof off the 17" in duo !
    After searching, I discovered the Howard Roberts fusion and although it sounded like an electric ham sandwich (thanks Frank Zappa) ,the ergonomics had me feeling like a figure skater on the board.
    I found a permanent soulmate in the Koll Ultraglide. If you have seen this model ... Saul Koll and I projected the first one and I sent him the dimensions of the HR. I`m sure he tweaked it but it was from that pedigree.
    Suffice it to say , it doesn't sound like an electric ham sandwich. To counteract the loss of the larger body we put the K&K contact pickup inside the body and I can dial in a taste of it for that sexy string noise and a richer harmonic content. This is especially essential because I work alot in duo with a singer. In my eyes I'm getting the beauty of an archtop sound in something that is a little more unique. I love the archtop because if you want it to NOT sustain ...the envelope will drop off and you get a punch with a decay ....much like a stacatto trumpet player.
    The guitar will stand up to a jab (I use 12's) yet still sing with sustain if desired. This is what a sax player does with long notes vs. tongued notes. If I try this on the 335 for instance, the note doesn't go into decay ...the inherent sustain from the solid block doesn't allow for me to cut off the note like a Clifford Brown phrasing does. I know ...put 12's on a 335 and listen to someone do it ...I have. BUT ...in my hands I can only get there with an archtop.
    The thing is that you want a creamy dense thick note and you need it in a split second. A solid body either chokes out on the percussive jab or takes too long to deliver the juicy part of the note in a machine gun phrase. This Koll Ultraglide does things for me that I haven't heard in other archtops at a drummer volume. Each build is different but I'm convinced the 15" body is ground zero for this tone. In my case there is NO F-hole so Saul also had to build around a biased EQ. Here are some examples.
    Can you hear the acoustic blend in the note ?

    solo at 2:30
    or here?
    Brazilian music is based on the acoustic nylon so the K&K blend gets me a bit of that air into the electric archtop.

    and with a band that a normal 16,17" would feed back over. If you got this far ..check out the popping in and out of the faster phrase at the end and the rich fat treble notes.
    This is a post as much about paying tribute (aka pimping) to Saul Koll's build as it is to the 15" body



    Last edited by WahmBomAh; 07-11-2020 at 12:07 PM.

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilpy
    Wow, it must be very exciting to commission a new Rancourt! If you have the option, I’d strongly suggest that you get a sound port on the side. Makes a huge difference in sound from the player’s perspective.
    It is very exciting and 14 months feels like a long time to wait. I had thought about a sound port but didn't pursue it with Guillaume. I'm going to run it by him and see what his thoughts are along with the additional cost. I upgraded the bridge and tailpiece and am trying to stay within my budget. I also decided to go with the cedar top like yours Gilpy vs the more traditional spruce. Guillaume really has a unique approach to archtop design and build.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by WahmBomAh
    Devoted 15" guy ...I think these days most players either migrated to archtops from solid body electrics or have to switch between them. My arm dynamics just adapt to the smaller body after decades of teles or strats or even 335's with the shallow depth.
    Depending on the builder's goal, the usual benefit of a 16, 17 inch is the deeper acoustic bass from the larger body.
    (All other things being equal)
    The transition from music before the 60's to music after the 60's has resulted in louder drummers and louder amplification. In the 50's it was string bass (often unamplified) and a 15-20 watt amp.
    Since then feedback has become an issue and my experience with full bodied archtops with a band often had me dialing down the bass on the amp to not get buried in the mix. Why 16,17" if I was dialing down the bass? I could get the EQ of the 15 into the amp without the struggle.
    If you can relate to this ... the 15" goes a long way to adapting the archtop sound to a modern setting.
    If I was to play my Monteleone (17") then all this gets thrown out the window because it feels and sounds like a Steinway. BUT ... Touring around 3 countries (pre pandemic) and hitting with some incredible but excitable drummers rendered the Monteleone useless. Even in duo the singer liked to be right next to me and she likes voice in the floor monitor.. I was getting that wooooof off the 17" in duo !
    After searching, I discovered the Howard Roberts fusion and although it sounded like an electric ham sandwich (thanks Frank Zappa) ,the ergonomics had me feeling like a figure skater on the board.
    I found a permanent soulmate in the Koll Ultraglide. If you have seen this model ... Saul Koll and I projected the first one and I sent him the dimensions of the HR. I`m sure he tweaked it but it was from that pedigree.
    Suffice it to say , it doesn't sound like an electric ham sandwich. To counteract the loss of the larger body we put the K&K contact pickup inside the body and I can dial in a taste of it for that sexy string noise and a richer harmonic content. This is especially essential because I work alot in duo with a singer. In my eyes I'm getting the beauty of an archtop sound in something that is a little more unique. I love the archtop because if you want it to NOT sustain ...the envelope will drop off and you get a punch with a decay ....much like a stacatto trumpet player.
    The guitar will stand up to a jab (I use 12's) yet still sing with sustain if desired. This is what a sax player does with long notes vs. tongued notes. If I try this on the 335 for instance, the note doesn't go into decay ...the inherent sustain from the solid block doesn't allow for me to cut off the note like a Clifford Brown phrasing does. I know ...put 12's on a 335 and listen to someone do it ...I have. BUT ...in my hands I can only get there with an archtop.
    The thing is that you want a creamy dense thick note and you need it in a split second. A solid body either chokes out on the percussive jab or takes too long to deliver the juicy part of the note in a machine gun phrase. This Koll Ultraglide does things for me that I haven't heard in other archtops at a drummer volume. Each build is different but I'm convinced the 15" body is ground zero for this tone. In my case there is NO F-hole so Saul also had to build around a biased EQ. Here are some examples.
    Can you hear the acoustic blend in the note ?

    solo at 2:30
    or here?
    Brazilian music is based on the acoustic nylon so the K&K blend gets me a bit of that air into the electric archtop.

    and with a band that a normal 16,17" would feed back over. If you got this far ..check out the popping in and out of the faster phrase at the end and the rich fat treble notes.
    This is a post as much about paying tribute (aka pimping) to Saul Koll's build as it is to the 15" body



    Succinctly put ! That guitar in your hands sound just great, wonderful playing and such beautiful tunes, more please !

  48. #47

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  49. #48

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    That's my guitar....And that's the video that convinced me to buy it! (I added a pickguard)

    Another 15" guitar that I've owned was a Sadowsky SS-15. A great guitar with a flawless jazz sound plugged in and a pretty decent acoustic tone for a laminate. I sold it to buy a hand carved archtop that didn't sound as good!

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by gitman
    Succinctly put ! That guitar in your hands sound just great, wonderful playing and such beautiful tunes, more please !
    thank you!

    with a 17" Monteleone

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57
    9400111298370252107815 The Music Zoo in N.Y. has just listed a Gibson L-5ces Signature on there website $5.9k
    Maybe it sold? I just looked and couldn't find it anywhere