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  1. #1

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    Raezers Edge Centauri Hybrid Amp
    Available in 2x8, 1x10 or 1x12
    Amp in the demo is 2x8 Eminence Alpha 8a
    200 watt class D power section, 12AX7A preamp tube running in true high voltage design for real tube sound. (many amps of this type actually use a low voltage to the tube and use other circuitry for the sound produced)
    Bass, Treble, Midrange controls similar to the Sol amplifier.
    Spring Reverb

    Very lightweight, amp / cabinet is approx 18 lbs not including speaker(s)

    Also, the president of the company, geoff Felscher will be featured as artist of the week in a week or two in my facebook group Modern Jazz Guitar Public Group | Facebook so check it out to see what else is on the horizon for them.


    Raezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-dsc01333-jpgRaezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-dsc01330-jpgRaezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-dsc01335-jpgRaezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-dsc01339-jpg


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Any idea what the price is/will be?

  4. #3

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    Not available as head-only?

  5. #4

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    They need to slow down -- I can't keep up with all their new gear!



    [I enjoy my Luna 200R head!]

  6. #5

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    How does this compare to the Henriksen Forte? Does this amp have an FX loop?

  7. #6
    not sure about the price, I just reached out to Geoff and will post back when I have more info. I'll be getting a prototype on wednesday or thursday. I think it will be available in a head too. Regarding henriksen, the power amps are completely different. Henriksen doesn't use class D and uses a more conventional analog amplifier design. The class D that Geoff uses saves a lot of weight and probably some $$$ too. I believe henriksen uses a digital reverb circuit. Geoff's preamp amp is based on a fender AB763 amplifier driving a spring reverb where the spring part of the circuit is driven by jfets that utilize a similar circuit design as fender from what I understand so it should have that swampy, fendery goodness. I never got one of the Forte's to try so I won't be able to do a sonic comparison.

  8. #7

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    Can't quite see the control panel/pots from those pics, would like to. 18 lbs is getting my gas going.
    Last edited by Woody Sound; 06-28-2020 at 06:14 PM.

  9. #8
    Raezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-dsc01334-jpg

    by the way,no effect loop. Loop is not needed on an amp that doesn't have overdrive.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    not sure about the price, I just reached out to Geoff and will post back when I have more info. I'll be getting a prototype on wednesday or thursday. I think it will be available in a head too. Regarding henriksen, the power amps are completely different. Henriksen doesn't use class D and uses a more conventional analog amplifier design. The class D that Geoff uses saves a lot of weight and probably some $$$ too. I believe henriksen uses a digital reverb circuit. Geoff's preamp amp is based on a fender AB763 amplifier driving a spring reverb where the spring part of the circuit is driven by jfets that utilize a similar circuit design as fender from what I understand so it should have that swampy, fendery goodness. I never got one of the Forte's to try so I won't be able to do a sonic comparison.
    Looks interesting. A 2 x 8 format can really sound full and rich, if the extra weight is acceptable, and there is a 3dB gain from having 2 speakers in the same cab in any combo amp.

    Re Hendriksen, I think that they have been using class D amps for the last year or two in the Bud and Blu amps, and maybe their new Ten amp. The giveaways are the lack of heatsinks ( ie finned metal extrusions ) on the back of those amps, which higher power " analogy" transistor amps need for heat dissipation, and the abruptly reduced weight. I also supect that the reason it's not been particularly broadcast by them is that previously they made a point of saying that no "digital" circuits were used in their gear. Class D isn't 'digital' anyway, it's a different kind of analogue, but this is a common misconception. I believe their Forte amp still uses Class A/B ( not class D ) circuitry. Nearly all reverb circuits, including jfet-based, use analogue circuitry. Modelling amps are where you really get into "digital' circuitry. This is not dissing Hendriksen, they make good amps, and technology evolves.

    Does it matter? Not really, unless you can hear the difference. I don't hear a difference. As you say the big advantage of Class D is the weight saving.

  11. #10
    Henriksen told me he is not using a class D amplifier in the forte. And just to clarify, most solid state amps are using a digital reverb circuit these days. Several companies including the company nuenaber who makes the wet verb are making chipsets that many of the SS amp makers are using. The reverb circuit in this raezer's edge amp uses an actual spring tank.

  12. #11

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    A little 2x8" open-back combo with a 12ax7 preamp tube, spring reverb, and plenty of ss power? Sounds like a great idea! I use one of these when the mood strikes. 30-year-old tech, and it does have some added functionality as well (stereo chorus, channel switching, line out, gain/master volume), but that's easy enough to ignore:


    Last edited by Hammertone; 06-28-2020 at 08:04 PM.

  13. #12
    if I'm not mistaken, that ampeg unit uses a low voltage tube circuit. In the Raezer's edge amplifier, he's driving the plates of the tubes with high voltage like fender does.

  14. #13

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    Re: Henriksen Forte power amp type: This is from a previous thread on the Forte. The quotes are from Peter Henriksen

    "The power amp - The Forte is not using a switching power supply or a class D power amp. The Forte uses the same A/B design we have been using with the JazzAmp since its inception. If you want to know technically what it is, it's a darlington pair transistor configuration. Our use of the word "analog" to describe the amp is meant more to differentiate it from modeling amplifiers than from class D. Recent class D developments have been extraordinary, and we are making use of it in our other products, however when we tried it with The Forte, you could really "feel" the difference, and we just felt the product was superior when coupled with the traditional A/B amplifier.

    The tube - it's a full plate voltage (as opposed to starved) 12AX7 circuit. Heat isn't really a serious concern, that's not why we have the tube sticking out of the top, we assumed people would be wanting to change out the tube and so looked for a way to marry the design with accessibility, and protect it at the same time. Our stock tube is a Mullard, so it's not like we went with the cheapest option for stock, but much like the speaker, we know there are plenty of options out there to suit individual tastes."

  15. #14

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    This is interesting to me because there is a difference in sound/feel comparing the same amp running 6V6 versus 6L6 tubes. What effect on tone do the RE and Henriksen tubeless power amps have? Are they “tuned” to emulate the sound of, say, a squishy single 6V6, or the harder edge of a 6L6, or do they have their own thing going on? Can/do they saturate like a tube-based power amp?

    As a geek, I am genuinely curious, not trying to diss solid-state amps in any way. I’ve owned several of the “better” solid-state amps and have found something to like in all of them—Lab Series, Yamaha G50/100, Pearce, Polytone, Henriksen. I actually have a Lab Series L3 arriving this week. The only one that I didn’t like all that much was a Polytone Baby Taurus—it was too “congested”, for lack of a better word.

  16. #15
    No, neither the henriksen or RE poweramps are designed to emulate tube power amps. They are simply amplifying the preamp...But...Many of the jazz amps utilize a circuit that IMO, is way to heavy in bass and low mids while I can't speak for the forte, never having played one - I can tell you that the power amp on the RE is not like that. It doesn't have a peaky treble or boomy/muddy bass.

  17. #16
    just heard back from Geoff. These will be around $1200 street, depending on speaker choice. Keeping my fingers crossed that my prototype will ship today!

  18. #17

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    Thanks. Not bad at all for what it is.

  19. #18

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    Jack, Thanks for your post. I asked about a comparison because I erroneously thought you had already checked out the Forte. Based on the videos from Bob Ross and Scott Lerner, a couple of months ago I purchased a Forte head. I'm very pleased with the Henriksen but I'm always interested in other options.

  20. #19
    So i got a couple new toys today from Geoff Felsher at Raezer's Edge.

    I got the new Raezer's Edge Luna 200R which is an updated version of the 200 I had and it's got more volume available as well as a great sounding reverb and dual outputs. No need for my RV7 anymore!

    But the highlight is the Centaur1 amp. It's a fender style tube preamp running at high voltage like a real fender, real spring reverb going into the luna power amp and through a 12" jensen neo speaker. Whole thing weighs about 25lbs. I'll be doing some demo clips this weekend!

    They both sound amazing. The preamp in the Centaur sounds better and more tubey than the kingsley maiden I've been using!


    Raezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-20200702_152327-jpg

    Raezer's Edge Centaur Hybrid Amp-20200702_152334-jpg

  21. #20

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    Looks good! During the winter I almost made a deal on the Luna with Geoff, but the shipping to EU got too high for me at the end.

    Now the Luna has reverb, and the Centaur seems quite optimal package too. I have to congratulate myself hesitating in winter!

    ...Hmm, but the shipping to EU is still high... hesitation goes on!

  22. #21
    A quick demo using a new Raezer's Edge Centaur amp. It's a hybrid amplifier utilizing a high voltage 12AX7-based fender-style preamp, real spring reverb, mated with a 200w Luna amplifier (also by Raezer's Edge). This one is a single 12" combo amp with a Jensen Tornado Stealth speaker and weighs less than 25lbs. Thanks to Geoff Felsher for making such cool gear.


  23. #22

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    Slow down, you move too fast! Your technique is awesome, to say the least. However, for an amp demo, we want long, lingering notes and buoyant chords.

  24. #23

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    You can hear some chording at 0:32 for around 5 seconds, also around 1:29 for a good while.

    I think the amp sounds great. I see one in my future.

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Slow down, you move too fast! Your technique is awesome, to say the least. However, for an amp demo, we want long, lingering notes and buoyant chords.
    it wasn't meant to be a formal factory demo for the amplifier. I'm sure one of those is coming soon. It was just a quick morning practice using the amp for those who wanted to know what it sounds like. I guess I'll rename the thread so as to avoid confusion.

  26. #25

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    Sounds great, Jay Zed. I am considering a Milkman The Amp 100 and the Seymour Duncan Powerstage 200/Effectrode Blackbird. I add the Raezer's Edge Centaur to my list of contenders.

  27. #26

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    Sounds really good! I'd sure consider that if I was looking for a new amp.

    How do you like the 'feel' of it? I see you know the speaker well. Would you change it out?

  28. #27
    The feel is great. Their amps have the best feel of any SS (hybrid in this case) guitar amp I've used for jazz and with the tube preamp it gets some cool sounds for pop, funk and fusion as well. Get a sweet overdriven sound (with a pedal). In terms of the speaker, it's a compromise. i definitely prefer the celestion G12H-75 creamback and the Alnico 90 creamback. Those are my favorite 2 speakers. The eminence Tonker also sounds great though it has too much bottom IMO. It didn't work well with the quilter for example. But I think it might work well with the Centaur. For me, I'd take on the extra 4lbs and put the celestion in it but if weight and power handling are the most important things to you or if you like the more middy-sounding jensen speakers, the tornado would be a good choice.

  29. #28

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    Sounds really good like a Dry Martini! And remember "You've got to make the Morning last, Kicking down the Cobblestones! Feeling Groovy!

  30. #29

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    Cool demo:


  31. #30

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    I found a puzzling description of the Luna 200R’s reverb from RE:

    ”When most people think of REVERB, it’s the springy 60’s surf type found in most amplifiers of the era, and it is a unique, useable sound. Real reverb however is a little different. The Luna 200R starts with a lush organic sounding reverb, but in a live setting reverb is not an instant sound. Think of it this way… if you are in a large room and you clap your hands. First, you will hear the clap, and then a delay as the sound travels to bounce off reflecting surfaces. It then returns from a number of sources. The distance control allows the player to set how far those sounds are coming from. This allows a much more natural sounding reverb.”

    This starts to sound like they have done the reverb by very short digital delay. Is that so?

    I have had two experiences with that kind of ”reverb” (J. Rockett Boing! pedal and DV Mark Micro 50 head) and it sounds like sound pingponging in a large bathroom. I felt claustrophobic when I realised the delay thing.

    In both cases I found it out by accidentally hitting the damped strings.

    I sold both away as fast as I could so some would say I like the traditional concept of reverb better.

    Can You Jack or somebody give some enlightment on this?

    (EDIT: This question should have been in Luna 200R thread. The title of this thread had it in but it has changed in some of these days.)

  32. #31
    There's no delay circuit in the new 200R. I think the original model had delay and reverb. But don't get hung up on wine-tasting vernacular. The new 200R has great reverb. Best I've heard on any SS amp TBH. Check it out here. No post processing and just a hint of reverb. It's perfect to me!


  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie
    I found a puzzling description of the Luna 200R’s reverb from RE:

    ”When most people think of REVERB, it’s the springy 60’s surf type found in most amplifiers of the era, and it is a unique, useable sound. Real reverb however is a little different. The Luna 200R starts with a lush organic sounding reverb, but in a live setting reverb is not an instant sound. Think of it this way… if you are in a large room and you clap your hands. First, you will hear the clap, and then a delay as the sound travels to bounce off reflecting surfaces. It then returns from a number of sources. The distance control allows the player to set how far those sounds are coming from. This allows a much more natural sounding reverb.”

    This starts to sound like they have done the reverb by very short digital delay. Is that so?

    I have had two experiences with that kind of ”reverb” (J. Rockett Boing! pedal and DV Mark Micro 50 head) and it sounds like sound pingponging in a large bathroom. I felt claustrophobic when I realised the delay thing.

    In both cases I found it out by accidentally hitting the damped strings.

    I sold both away as fast as I could so some would say I like the traditional concept of reverb better.

    Can You Jack or somebody give some enlightment on this?

    (EDIT: This question should have been in Luna 200R thread. The title of this thread had it in but it has changed in some of these days.)
    Sounds to me like a roundabout way of describing what is commonly called “predelay.” On some studio reverbs (and a few pedal-based reverbs), there is a predelay knob that allows to you to set the length of time, usually in milliseconds, before the reverb is heard. I have found that longer predelay times help the unprocessed guitar sound stand out a bit more. When there’s no predelay the natural guitar sound loses some clarity, at least to my ear.

  34. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr View Post
    Sounds to me like a roundabout way of describing what is commonly called “predelay.” On some studio reverbs (and a few pedal-based reverbs), there is a predelay knob that allows to you to set the length of time, usually in milliseconds, before the reverb is heard. I have found that longer predelay times help the unprocessed guitar sound stand out a bit more. When there’s no predelay the natural guitar sound loses some clarity, at least to my ear.
    in this case it was not a pre-delay. It was actually a delay/chorus chip that sat alongside the reverb chip but due to customer feedback, it was removed and the new version without it sounds much better IMO...

  35. #34

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    Wow, they have really tried to improve the standard ways of reverb. Good to hear that they have succeeded too!