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  1. #51

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    One highly underrated pedal which works really great as a fun box for Jazz is the Strymon Deco. Before all this™, I played a few gigs with a small board with just this pedal and two EQs and really started to like this setup.

    You can use it to add a bit of compression and saturation which is quite different from your usual 'overdrive'. Its second side does modulation (flange, chorus, short delay), from subtle and beautiful to crazy wild. It shines adding a little warmth and something to your sound without being an over the top 'effect' necessarily.

    As for the question, while of course every other type of guitarist should probably get an overdrive as a first pedal, imho for Jazz you should get an EQ first. Not very exciting, but you can get so much sonic mileage out of it, it solves all kinds of venue-acoustics problems, allows you to plug into any kind of shitty amplifier you might have to plug in to, etc.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by thpm
    One highly underrated pedal which works really great as a fun box for Jazz is the Strymon Deco. Before all this™, I played a few gigs with a small board with just this pedal and two EQs and really started to like this setup.

    You can use it to add a bit of compression and saturation which is quite different from your usual 'overdrive'. Its second side does modulation (flange, chorus, short delay), from subtle and beautiful to crazy wild. It shines adding a little warmth and something to your sound without being an over the top 'effect' necessarily.

    As for the question, while of course every other type of guitarist should probably get an overdrive as a first pedal, imho for Jazz you should get an EQ first. Not very exciting, but you can get so much sonic mileage out of it, it solves all kinds of venue-acoustics problems, allows you to plug into any kind of shitty amplifier you might have to plug in to, etc.
    I agree about the Deco. I had one in the past, and regret selling it.

    As for the EQs you mention, I'd be interested in hearing how/why you use two. And which models are they?

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by einarcc
    As for the EQs you mention, I'd be interested in hearing how/why you use two. And which models are they?
    A graphic and a parametric, by Boss and Empress respectively. Not very exciting, I use the graphic to tune to the room and some general tone shaping— slightly cuttting some lowend, or fake a Fender-scoop on non-Fender amps, that sort of thing. It‘s mostly always on.

    The ParaEQ I use more specific to cut or boost certain frequencies, to get rid of feedback for example, or to give a bit of “single-coily” punch to humbuckers. Another thing I like it for is the “solo boost without more volume”— stepping on it to go from a slightly scooped rhythm sound to an emphasis in midrange can really change your presence in the band without being overpowering. I don‘t like bridge pickups usually and never got into rocking that volume ore tone pot a lot… It comes more naturally to me to do this with pedals.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by thpm
    A graphic and a parametric, by Boss and Empress respectively. Not very exciting, I use the graphic to tune to the room and some general tone shaping— slightly cuttting some lowend, or fake a Fender-scoop on non-Fender amps, that sort of thing. It‘s mostly always on.

    The ParaEQ I use more specific to cut or boost certain frequencies, to get rid of feedback for example, or to give a bit of “single-coily” punch to humbuckers. Another thing I like it for is the “solo boost without more volume”— stepping on it to go from a slightly scooped rhythm sound to an emphasis in midrange can really change your presence in the band without being overpowering. I don‘t like bridge pickups usually and never got into rocking that volume ore tone pot a lot… It comes more naturally to me to do this with pedals.

    I couldn't agree more. I use the Boss GE-7. (I did an inexpensive Fromel mod to quiet down the hiss/noise that is built into some of the stock GE-7s). For example, before the COVID-apocalypse I was playing a Tuesday night gig at a local restaurant. I would usually take my ES-175 and a Quilter 101 Reverb with a Raezer's Edge cabinet. I would set up in a corner of the dining room that had a strange boomy frequency that I couldn't shake by moving the location of the cabinet; nor could I roll it out with the bass control on the Quilter. However, I easily located and dialed it out on the GE-7.

    One other (unlikely) pedal I have found really handy in jazz settings is the Wampler Tumnus. I do a fair amount of theater and musical pit orchestra work, so I like to keep an all purpose overdrive on pedal board. I found that if I turn the gain all the way down and treat it like a clean boost, that the Bass, Middle, and Treble controls act as nice tone shapers. By boosting the mids a bit and rolling off the treble a hair, I can get a nice jazz (almost an archtop) tone out of my ES-335 into a Princeton or Deluxe Reverb.

  6. #55

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    I have Empress ParaEQ and MXR 6 band eq. Empress is incredibly good. Very flexible for tone shaping. But what's even more impressive is how transparent it is (other than the eq change you intend obviously). MXR to me has a more processed sound.

    You can do a million things with Empress. For example one of my archtops is noticeably loader in certain mid frequencies. I can identify the exact center of that frequency range, choose one of the 3 Q values that best cover it, and reduce the volume there. I get a very balanced guitar for chord melodies. I can make my Tubescreamer sound like a completely different pedal (any pedal pretty much). I can shape the tone of my amps for lead and rhythm in very specific ways. All this without any unnatural, processed sound. Just amazing.

    I haven't gigged with it yet as I got it during the covid lockdown but I suspect I can get the sound I want in any room with any amp with this pedal in a very pleasant way.

  7. #56

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    The Empress ParaEQ looks to be a useful tool to stop feedback, this vid at 4:13 explains how.


  8. #57

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    For playing out in different venues with different acoustics I have 2 recommendations:

    1. Go wireless - this will allow you to go to different parts of the room to hear your sound. You'll be amazed at the different sounds you hear in different rooms or even different places in the same room, with identical amp settings... Plenty of good gear here - my choice was the Boss W50 in pedalboard format.
    2. Use eq to correct what you hear in the room. What you hear next to the amp is - most of the time - in no way representative of what you will hear elsewhere in the room. My choice here was the MWR 6 band eq. It allows me to keep my amp settings identical in terms of tone.

  9. #58

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    Heads up though Empress ParaEQ is discontinued. Some stores still have it in stock. It's expansive (not for what it does) but I suspect it'll hold it's value really well in the used market for years to come.

  10. #59

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    I'm in favor of anything that kepps you interested and makes playing more fun. There are no rules and no referees and the only one who gets to tell you what works best for you is you.

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    Since I play nylon strings almost exclusively, my Godin Multiac Nylon 7-string benefits from multi-processors that allow me to use it in almost any setting, including Broadway-style rock musicals, or behind vocalists who may be quite versatile and will need at various times classical guitar, typical older-school jazz guitar sounds, or rocking out blues and distorted tones.
    That sounds interesting. I do some pit work and the occasional tune that requires a nylon string sound is generally politely ignored. I suspect you may have the opposite problem in trying to cope with tube-screamer type tunes or have you found a way around that on the Godin?

  12. #61

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    I'm not big into pedals either, but this one has entered my consciousness as nearly as essential as reverb, for the sole purpose of adding depth to the sound. I typically use the chorus/vibrato completely rolled off, Blend around 5 o'clock (very quiet), Feedback around 10 o'clock, with a rather long Delay (12 o'clock or longer); match the Level to your amp volume or use it as a boost if you really want. The overall effect is similar to reverb, and the low volume of the delay ensures that the sound doesn't get muddy. Some folks in studio will apply multiple delays at slightly different latencies in stereo, which adds a nice room-filling effect (see e.g. Pat Metheny : Question & Answer for a similar approach using faster delay). The Memory Man unit I have is analogue, which adds a warm depth that doesn't sound as artificial as can digital delay (though of course depends on the unit).


  13. #62

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    I like to have an idiosyncratic sound and don't want or need to sound like anything other than me. My band does all original music, and I want to sound the way I sound. I have some 'always on' pedals that do that, an EQ (Fromel Shape), a comp (3 Leaf Audio), and a noise gate. I set the compressor and noise gate to soften the attack and change the sustain to make things more horn-like.

    I'm not interested in trying to sound like classic players or emulate classic guitar sounds from any genre, but I also don't need to because I don't play in groups that are trying to do that. I like players like Kurt Rosenwinkle and Mansur Brown who have a signature sound that is their own.

    As long as whatever is in between the strings and the speaker is controllable musically to add expression, and you use it not as an 'effect' but as part of 'your voice' and so is part of the instrument you play, as long as it's available why not?

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by mabbott88
    I'm not big into pedals either, but this one has entered my consciousness as nearly as essential as reverb, for the sole purpose of adding depth to the sound. I typically use the chorus/vibrato completely rolled off, Blend around 5 o'clock (very quiet), Feedback around 10 o'clock, with a rather long Delay (12 o'clock or longer); match the Level to your amp volume or use it as a boost if you really want. The overall effect is similar to reverb, and the low volume of the delay ensures that the sound doesn't get muddy. Some folks in studio will apply multiple delays at slightly different latencies in stereo, which adds a nice room-filling effect (see e.g. Pat Metheny : Question & Answer for a similar approach using faster delay). The Memory Man unit I have is analogue, which adds a warm depth that doesn't sound as artificial as can digital delay (though of course depends on the unit).

    Very interesting...Thanks for the details. I'll give a try.

  15. #64

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    Best Jazz Pedals?-jazz-pedal-jpg

  16. #65

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    Nice!