Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 27 of 27
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hi!
    Have been thinking about buying Easman guitar fo some time, but i live in a country with no official Eastman dealer so i only can buy used one. And one guy here is selling his Eastman AR380CE John Pisano signature (basically it is the only Eastman electric on sale in whole country right now lol) for like $1100 and i'm not able to play it before purchasing. Guitar is really beautiful from what i can see on the internet and it looks like a nice option to me (cosidering that i can't think of any other avaliable alternative besides Ibanez PM2) but i have some second thoughts.
    So my question is what do you think about that guitar? Been looking at ES-175 style guitar, love the sound and style of it, and this guitar happens to be very similar (its only thinner, i believe). I am more into bassy, mellow sound. My reference points in terms of sound are Jim Hall, Joe Diorio, Metheny, if talking about old school guys and Gilad Hekselman and Kreisberg if talking about new generation.
    I am assuming John Pisano is an old school guy, so how flexible is this guitar in terms of sound? How does it cope with more modern sound?
    Thanks!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    It's well-made, comfortable and most I've played are easy to play, a good choice for the money. It's electric and hollow, so you should be able to get a nice warn sound out if it with a good amp.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Hi there,

    I own this model. It is a great guitar in my opinion. Very light weight and the pickups do provide some nice low end. It has a great neck and fretboard. Never tried a real Gibson ES-175 so I can’t compare for you. As for versatility I think it is only (or at least best) straight ahead clean old school jazz. Check out some videos of John Pisano as this guitar really can do this sound very well.

    Cosmetically it is wonderful but the color of mine is much redder than a friend of mine’s is but it plays so well and sounds great so it really doesn’t matter. Hope this helps!

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    extremely different guitars. The eastman has a very thin top and a response more like a hand carved archtop . It's a much lighter build than the 175 which is a thick top, very heavy build. The eastman will feedback more but will have a more delicate and complex sound where the 175 will have a more electric sound, more sustain, less feedback and that typical thunky midrange. You won't get thunk AT ALL from the eastman. I would say that in terms of consistency, the eastman would be your best best. Gibson 175s are one of the most inconsistent guitars.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    The Eastman 380 is a great guitar. Good price too.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    extremely different guitars. The eastman has a very thin top and a response more like a hand carved archtop . It's a much lighter build than the 175 which is a thick top, very heavy build. The eastman will feedback more but will have a more delicate and complex sound where the 175 will have a more electric sound, more sustain, less feedback and that typical thunky midrange. You won't get thunk AT ALL from the eastman. I would say that in terms of consistency, the eastman would be your best best. Gibson 175s are one of the most inconsistent guitars.
    Thanks for the answer. English is not my native tongue, so i'm sorry, but what exactly do you mean by "thunky"? And how what would you say about getting the tones for players i described in the starting post?

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    john pisano replaced jim hall in hall's first band-the chico hamilton quintet...he also was joe pass' right hand man...great player...

    im not an eastman fan, but the pisano model is the exception...and 1100$ is great price!!!..almost too good...make sure seller is good and will accept return

    luck

    cheers

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by tvorog View Post
    Thanks for the answer. English is not my native tongue, so i'm sorry, but what exactly do you mean by "thunky"? And how what would you say about getting the tones for players i described in the starting post?
    Here is what is to my mind a classically thunky jazz guitar tone:



    As for Jim Hall's sound, which Jim Hall sound? His ES-175 with the P90, ES-175 with humbucker, his D'Aquisto, his Sadowsky? All are quite different sounds.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Jack Z nailed the description of these guitars. I used to own the JP880 model. Very nice light 16" archtop with a very thin top and back to produce an acoustic response.

    ES-175 depending on year or model can vary quite a bit in light build to very heavy laminate construction . I prefer the heavier builds of the late 1980s to more current models
    Although they do build a Historic lighter build that's quite nice in on way!

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Thunk is the mid range honk you get out of a great 175. It's a term I've coined but it seems to have stuck and is now widely used to describe this kind of smokey, dark, mid-rangey tone that the 175 is famous for. You won't get this out of the eastman guitars. I've heard it from some older guilds and also the seventy seven guitars.



  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    I played one once and thought it was a terrific guitar. Easy to play, nice and light. Very responsive, but not at all like a 175. Jack was right about that.

    The Eastman would make a great solo or duo guitar. You can milk a lot of nuance out of it. You might be able to use it with a rhythm section if you stuffed enough foam in it, but as it is I think it would be pretty feedback prone. That's what light, lively and responsive guitars do.

  13. #12

    Guys, sorry for my questions, but this is the video that should have been added to the starting post. Peter Bernstein's sound (right audio channel) is exactly the tone i'm in the search for right now. Bassy, mellow, thick. Is eastman fine for that kind of tone?

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    From a practical point of view, if these guitars are hard to come by in the op’s area, and considering the price, there doesn’t seem to be much down side in trying one.

    I’m a fan of the brand and have bought three used Eastman acoustics. One day I hope to try one of their arch tops.

    Good luck to the OP.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    If you're looking for a 175'esque sound in that price range, you'd better look at the Ibanez AF-series or the LGB30. I have the LGB30 and it has the thunk, sustain and 'electric' tone that resembles the 175. A lot of Eastmans arch tops sound way more 'acoustic'. I tried to make my AR403 sound like a 175 but it didn't (which I could have known of course).

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    +1 on Ibanez.
    Joe yes the LGB is a nice 175 sound.
    I have an AF200 and an AF95FM, the 200 would probably be out of your price range. But the 95 is a great jazz guitar, the Ibanez Super 58 humbuckers are legendary for their range from “thunk” to solo. Their finishing is better than most, and it’s not too heavy.
    I know Eastmans have a strong following here, and I think for some reason Ibanez Doesn’t come up in recommendations as often as it should. Maybe not exclusive enough? I dunno. But the guitar for it’s price is worth looking at. My L5 is a case queen since I got my Ibanez guitars.
    George Benson seems to think they’re OK
    good luck on your search!


    PS
    Re Tal’s sound: he replaced the E and B strings in a set of D’Addario Flat heavies with. 15/18 or 20. It makes a huge difference. Also a thick plain old Fender heavy pick.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    For relatively low-cost, I would look at Ibanez guitars as well. I've owned a few Eastmans because they seemed like nice guitars "for the money".
    But the sound and feel of these lower cost Ibanez guitars is closer to a Gibson, in my experience. The one Eastman I liked was the 580CE.

    The suggestion of AF95 is good! Also, LGB30 is also good suggestion, but some of those are rather heavy.

    PD

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joeontheguitar View Post
    If you're looking for a 175'esque sound in that price range, you'd better look at the Ibanez AF-series or the LGB30. I have the LGB30 and it has the thunk, sustain and 'electric' tone that resembles the 175. A lot of Eastmans arch tops sound way more 'acoustic'. I tried to make my AR403 sound like a 175 but it didn't (which I could have known of course).
    i don't agree. The LGB30 doesn't really have thunk like a 175. If the original poster is after a peter bernstein sound, the eastman will be much closer.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Bernstein plays a boutique solid carved top model. The Eastman is about as close to that as you can get from a moderately priced factory guitar. Considering that there are few other options open to the OP, I would advise going for it. It's all well and good to recommend every make and model we know about, but if they aren't available to the OP, it's a waste of everyone's time.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    We say Potato and Y'all say Tomato, Gibson,Ibanez, let the poor guy play them and decide. LOL !

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jads57 View Post
    We say Potato and Y'all say Tomato, Gibson,Ibanez, let the poor guy play them and decide. LOL !
    maybe you missed his comment but he said as far he knows, those are the only 2 archtops in his country.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Thank you. At your keen observation I shall place myself in jazz guitar prison.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Well, guitar is only one element of your tone (leaving out the human elements).

    Your cable, more specifically it's capacitance rating in picofarads/meter, also has an effect because it shifts the resonant peak of the pickup. So you may find a higher capacitance cable brings the tone down a bit towards the warmer, smokier, bassier quality. Part of the "secret" to Hendrix's tone was that high capacitance coiled cable that he intended to use.

    And of course the amp plays a big part. Peter Bernstein likes Fender amps and his tone is actually quite bright in person, certainly much brighter than say Jim Hall, and not to my ears at all "mellow". I don't care for the mid range scoop of the blackface Fender tone stack so much; my favorite amp is an old style Fender tweed Deluxe which is a very bassy amp. But a lot of people here favor the brighter Fender blackface/silverface/modern amps and sound great with them.

    I think that with most guitars you will eventually figure out how to get the sound you want. All this being said, that is a well regarded guitar and to my ears I prefer the lower end John Pisano model to the higher end one.

  24. #23
    Guys, thanks everyone for the answers. Quick update here. I desided to buy Eastman and already paid it, but in the last moment the seller changed his mind and refused to sell it saying he really loves this guitar and sent money back. It sucks, really.

    So i guess i'm gonna try out those Benson and Metheny Ibanez signatures.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by tvorog View Post
    Guys, thanks everyone for the answers. Quick update here. I desided to buy Eastman and already paid it, but in the last moment the seller changed his mind and refused to sell it saying he really loves this guitar and sent money back. It sucks, really.

    So i guess i'm gonna try out those Benson and Metheny Ibanez signatures.
    Yeah, that truly sucks. But it's happened, many times before. People get attached to guitars then at the last minute have a change of heart once interest is shown by a buyer. It's that attachment thing....hard to part with stuff when you're attached. Good luck in finding just the right guitar for you!

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Hi tvorog

    I agree that’s not a great trick on the sellers part especially since money changed hands.
    fyi the Ibanez Metheny Models are all maple. They are more ‘acoustic’ and are bright. With 14s they mellow out
    a bit, but maple is maple.
    The Benson models are definitely more in the ES 175 sound, as are the AF models. Take a look on their
    site at the AF95.
    The AG series are small bodies ala the original George Benson GB10. I had one and sold it off
    pretty quick, could never get a nice round jazz tone.
    any questions feel free to PM.
    check out ibanezrules.com. I know Rich sells/ships world wide and is a great resource on Ibanez.
    hope this helps...
    d

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    i don't agree that the metheny models are more acoustic or that the benson models sound like a 175. I think that's backwards. The metheny models were inspired by pat's 175 and the benson models were inspired by gibson L5 and guild x500. At any rate, you might take a look at my facebook group Modern Jazz Guitar Public Group | Facebook. Peter Bernstein is a friend of mine and a member there and posts on the forum. He probably would answer your question if you asked it.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    I own them. Been playing 35 years. My opinions are no more or less valid then anyone else. I stand by them.

    "In all human work, the wise look for virtues and fools look for flaws". Jose Ramirez I