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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Talk talk talk .. It's so easy to say stuff like this, but without examples it means little.


    But when you dig into concrete examples of guitar ... suddenly you find that those big brand guitars aren't necessarily more expensive than others ... or worse for that matter.

    There are so many brands these days and competition is stiff .. so usually you get what you pay for.


    Off course if you can provide specific examples where a traditional brand gets smoked by a non-traditional one then please do. I doubt it tho
    Here's a story for you: When I graduated from university I bought myself an Epiphone Elitist Broadway as a graduation present. I always loved the Wes Montgomery/L5 vibe and could have afforded a Gibson L5 CES or Wes Montgomery model at the time. The Epi seemed like a good value though, so I bought it instead.

    A few years later, I just had to have a Gibson and I bought a Wesmo, intending to sell the Epi. The Gibson was beautiful looking with premium solid woods, but it had some quirks. For example, it had a wolf tone on one note that drove me crazy. The Epi was always stalwart perfection. In fact, I came to call it "my Lexus" because like the car brand, it was big and heavy, but incredibly well built. I was also paranoid about taking the Gibson to real-world gigs where it might get damaged or stolen. After a while I realized the Epi was actually a much better guitar, so I kept it and sold the Gibson. I did get more for the Gibson than I paid for it though.

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  3. #52

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    My tastes in and appreciation for guitars has evolved considerably over the more than 4 decades I have played. I did start having brand awareness soon after I started playing. This is something that's drilled into the consumer by marketing, so it's nearly impossible to avoid. Martin was the brand that I aspired to - mostly for the quality of the instruments they made but also for the aesthetics of their brand. After many, many years I finally attained my goal of owning one. I turned my nose at imports for many years, aspired to (and even owned for a while) a high-end, custom instrument built by an independent luthier.

    Tone and playability have always been paramount for me, but aesthetics are also important. I have played amazing flying V's, but that's not my thing and I'll never own one. It's still fun to check them out and appreciate them as instruments. That's the thing about musical instruments. They can be both the functional sound machine as well as an object of art to be admired for its own aesthetic beauty. The combination of an amazingly beautiful object that also makes beautiful sounds is a compelling combination. And yes, the beautiful sound created by an instrument has more to do with the player than the instrument, but the instrument certainly has an influence. Chris Thile playing his Loar will always sound more incredible than Chris Thile playing a 'The Loar'. (But I'm sure he could make a 'The Loar' sound incredible.)

    Some folks love to geek out on gear. I don't begrudge them. I like looking at (but not owning) vintage gear and talking about the attributes of my guitars with other guitarists. I especially like discovering brands or models that I didn't know about and that match my preferences. And my instrument collection has evolved over the years. I keep it limited to instruments I'll play - I don't want to own an instrument just for the sake of saying I own it. And I've ditched the handmade guitar (which I didn't play enough to warrant having all that money tied up in it). It was fun to go through that process and to be a patron to the builder. But the responsibility of owning a guitar of that value wasn't offset (for me, anyway) by whatever enjoyment I derived from playing it. (And I'm not made of money....;-). FWIW I didn't buy that guitar for the sake of saying 'I own a Klein.' I bought it because I loved his guitars and thought it would be amazing to have one. And I found myself with the means to have him make one for me at a certain point in my life. And it was amazing to own and to play. I also became friends with him through the process of the build and that was really nice.

    I now own a mix of US and imported instruments. They all are great and play wonderfully (in some cases out of the box and in some cases because I had a luthier do a good setup on them). So I appreciate that imports can be great instruments, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of US. That also makes me wonder about the working conditions and quality of life of the folks that made my instrument. Another thing to think about and talk about with other guitarists.....

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by broturtel
    TL;DR: Why do we pay so much for the same package with a different name on it? Why do some people "only play authentic." AND another question: when someone doesn't play an American instrument, why is there so much backlash for it? Especially if it's affordable and high quality.

    long version snipped)

    BT
    I think your observations are off. From what I've seen on this forum, in many years of hanging out on music forums, and in the real world with other musicians, "brandism" as you call it, and denigration of less expensive gear is much less common than you make it seem. And I have literally never encountered a musician in person say that only American-made equipment is good or criticize someone else for playing a non-US-made instrument. In the real world, people play the instruments they like because they can. On the internet, people say dumb or provocative stuff ... because they can.

    John

  5. #54

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    With many it's an ego thing - if someone says "I play 'xxxxx' brand guitar, it boosts his/her ego and impresses the listener who may not know much. Personally, I couldn't care less what brand guitar someone plays as long as he can play. Simple enough. I've never been impressed by names (although I used to have a 'thing' for the Chet Atkins Gretsch models) and I've made a whole lot of $$$$ for a lot of years playing homemade Telecasters. I just can't see putting a lot of money in an instrument based on the name on the peghead or who plays it. Just my $.02.....ymmv.

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    TGP has discussions like this one ongoing all the time. Nothing is ever resolved.

    Danny W.
    How could it be? We all think diferently and no one is wrong about what they decide for themselves. Kind of a foolish topic makes people have to justify what they do. Hint "you don't have too"
    Last edited by skiboyny; 06-05-2020 at 09:33 AM.

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    DO YOU SERIOUSLY WANT TO START IN ON LAWN MOWERS!!
    Too late, see post 37.

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukmanohnz
    So I appreciate that imports can be great instruments, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of US. That also makes me wonder about the working conditions and quality of life of the folks that made my instrument. Another thing to think about and talk about with other guitarists.....
    It has taken too long for someone to mention working and living conditions. It should be said importing from China is not the same as a Japanese import or even Korean.

    What makes me sad is when I see people who own 4, thousand dollar imports from China (of essentially the same guitar). Rather than owning one instrument made well from good quality components and by people who can earn a living.

    I think it is more a reflection of consumerism. But I find it such a waste of resources and money.

    If you have money to burn. By all means buy three d'Angelico archtops.

    Full disclosure: I own three luthier built guitars as well as vintage instruments. But I also bought a used loar archtop to leave at school. Because I don't trust students not to step on anything.

  9. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    ...but if you’d like to find me a non vintage guitar that does what my Loar LH600 does for less than $5K be my guest...
    One of the guitars I own is a Loar LH-650. Great guitars! And seriously incredibly cheap for solid wood guitars. Literally got this guitar for WAY less than $1K, b-stock.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    ...For instance, my knackered old tuners are a nightmare but I can’t replace them....
    Why not?

  11. #60

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    I like good gear. It's possible to be a gear-head and have no brand loyalty or own a ton of gear. I own the best 3 guitars that I can scrape up the cash for. I play guitar and don't have the income for the big name archtops. I do own a Lehmann though.

    As was mentioned, I only see brand snobbery online and not around here for the most part. I hate the posts where someone puts somebody down for paying too much for a top end instrument. Some of the stuff about Lerch's Manzer was pretty hard to take.

    All my best to those that can have the instrument they want, as well as those who prefer 'bang-for-the-buck'.

  12. #61

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    I own several mainline US made instruments, and have gigged with all of them. I also have owned, and gigged with, several offshore brands of good quality. I love 'em all. I do think it is relevant to point out that most of the designs and features of our favorite instruments originated with US makers and that that deserves some respect.

    Anecdote: I used to schlep an extra guitar to every gig, some of which admitted the general public and served alcohol, with predictably un-predictable results. One night things started to get a little dicey, so I cased my (for-the -time quite expensive, but superlative) US-made instrument and got out the Asian-made beater, which looked good, played well, and was, relatively speaking, expendable. For one song. Next tune, back to the snob-worthy, built-like-a-tank, great looking, great sounding, Never-let-me-down instrument the served the music and me as well as the vintage Made-in-USA collectible guitar it took the place of as my #1.*

    *I still took a spare guitar, but it was a better one.

    Anecdote#2: Audiences haven't a clue, and in any case don't care. We were playing a local watering hole on evening when during a break, an acquaintance, who was perhaps a tad over the legal limit, came up to me and took me to task for playing a "Japanese guitar"( the guitar in question was, natch, my #1, made in Annapolis, MD. USA.
    This, on a night when I debuted my new stage clothes: three changes of three colors of long-tailed tuxedos with matching top hats and frilly shirts.**

    ** It has long been my policy that, in the not-at-all-unlikely case that the police are called in for whatever reason, I do not wish to be mistaken for a patron.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazmo
    A few years later, I just had to have a Gibson and I bought a Wesmo, intending to sell the Epi. The Gibson was beautiful looking with premium solid woods, but it had some quirks. For example, it had a wolf tone on one note that drove me crazy.
    So in other words, you state that the woods where better and that more labor was put into building the Gibson. In other words what is called cost that drive the price up?

    I'm pretty sure you don't find that wolf note on all Gibson tho, as I'm sure you can also find Epi's with that feature too

    A twice as expensive guitar is never twice as good. You've found the Epi good enough, but that doesn't really say that the build of the Gibson should be priced equally to the Epi. Just that it isn't worth that price to you.

    I'm saying that if you want the type of build that the Gibson goes for then you can't really find it at a cheaper price

    (at least until a few years ago when Gibson still had a production of archtops. These days they've shut shop down and are only offering Crimson Shop guitars at full premium to the crowd that doesn't mind going that route. They are a small luthier shop currently)


    Quote Originally Posted by Chazmo
    I was also paranoid about taking the Gibson to real-world gigs where it might get damaged or stolen.

    That is you're personal aversion to risk. It has nothing to do with anyone but you. Plenty of people don't mind gigging expensive guitars, other like to have them at home for personal joy and recording .. While others still discern between gigs and will take cheap guitars to less safe gigs.
    Last edited by Lobomov; 06-05-2020 at 06:05 AM.

  14. #63

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    Some years back, I took a guitar class from a master player. The students were intermediate players with an exception or two. But what a collection of archtops! A Borys, L5, and some other boutique archtop makers.

    I've never wanted to be the worst player in a jam with the most expensive gear.

  15. #64

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    Yeah, there's a guitar shop I used to spend a fair bit of time in as it was near work, specialising in expensive luthier-made guitars. One day I asked the assistant who most of their customers were, whether they were mostly professionals. he laughed and said they were mostly retired men who were pretty crap guitar players.

    In the acoustic folk world you would not believe the discrepancy between ability of guitarist and cost of instrument. It's almost like having a fine wine collection to some of them. Each to their own of course. I'll stop bitching now!

  16. #65

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    Working with lots of other musicians besides guitarists in 2 jazz orchestras +, the only comment about gear I'd ever get would be "that sounds good" or "that's a pretty guitar". Never owned an American archtop.

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Milton
    Yeah, there's a guitar shop I used to spend a fair bit of time in as it was near work, specialising in expensive luthier-made guitars. One day I asked the assistant who most of their customers were, whether they were mostly professionals. he laughed and said they were mostly retired men who were pretty crap guitar players.

    In the acoustic folk world you would not believe the discrepancy between ability of guitarist and cost of instrument. It's almost like having a fine wine collection to some of them. Each to their own of course. I'll stop bitching now!

    We choose a profession that actually pays well and now when buying instruments, we like to go for something that doubles as art. Twice the joy.

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    We choose a profession that actually pays well and now when buying instruments, we like to go for something that doubles as art. Twice the joy.
    thats the emotional investment I’m talking about ... it’s often expressed at gigs by the middle aged dude who comes up to after a gig and insists on talking about guitars. similarly on this forum.

    People just want to be involved in music really. They might feel on some level they’ve sacrificed their chance to be involved to be involved in music 24/7 but at least they can have seriously nice guitars. There might be a bit of regret there, a bit of longing. Maybe when they were young they played more music, or really wanted x instrument. Buying a gorgeous guitar has a lot of bittersweet emotions to it, perhaps.

    The joke is they don’t realise we pros don’t have any more time to practice let alone play purely for pleasure, because we’re all doing other stuff like teaching, driving (a lot) and doing endless paperwork haha. But at least we get to play gigs for people who love the music.

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    thats the emotional investment I’m talking about ... it’s often expressed at gigs by the middle aged dude who comes up to after a gig and insists on talking about guitars. similarly on this forum.

    People just want to be involved in music really. They might feel on some level they’ve sacrificed their chance to be involved to be involved in music 24/7 but at least they can have seriously nice guitars.

    See that's the spirit .. Applauding people for loving music and seriously being into it at whatever level they can. Instead of shaming them for that lack of skill

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    There might be a bit of regret there, a bit of longing. Maybe when they were young they played more music, or really wanted x instrument. Buying a gorgeous guitar has a lot of bittersweet emotions to it, perhaps.
    We're all different .. I can only speak on my own behalf, but

    Regret .. Definately no! .. When you're young then you see only the glamour of being a pro guitar players. A middle class middle aged guy like me knows what work is these days and know that only the very few extremely lucky guitar players end up making bank playing guitar.

    There is no way I'd exchange my secure life in government administration with the hustling, late work hours and networking needed to make it in music.



    To me it's several things
    Biggest being nostalgia. Longing to a time, where you still was alert and exploring. When stringing 4 chords together that sounded ok felt like a big achevement .. Your stellar song writing contribution to modern music! We long to be that curious young guy again from back when the world was fresh and exciting and you felt alive. These days it's up, feed kids, go to work, spread sheets, feed kids again, go numb in front of a screen, go to bed .. rince repeat.

    But it is also nice finally having the chops to play stuff that you've marveled at aged 15. Gives a sense of accomplishment.

    But yeah .. Being tired every day after work does make it easier to collect guitars (my current total just went up to 8) than actually having the strength to put in effort to get better. So I do compensate around once a year by buying a nice guitar to my collection for new sounds. Having new sounds available is also progress isn't it?



    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    The joke is they don’t realise we pros don’t have any more time to practice let alone play purely for pleasure, because we’re all doing other stuff like teaching, driving (a lot) and doing endless paperwork haha. But at least we get to play gigs for people who love the music.

    Don't most realize this?
    Last edited by Lobomov; 06-05-2020 at 08:11 AM.

  20. #69

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    Just realized that my last post might sound critical of being a professional musician

    Not at all off course, but I apparently didn't have a enough love for music back in the day to go down that route and I really lack people's skills that are needed. So imagining myself in that role .. thus having regret .. is not a thing.

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    thats the emotional investment I’m talking about ... it’s often expressed at gigs by the middle aged dude who comes up to after a gig and insists on talking about guitars. similarly on this forum.

    People just want to be involved in music really. They might feel on some level they’ve sacrificed their chance to be involved to be involved in music 24/7 but at least they can have seriously nice guitars. There might be a bit of regret there, a bit of longing. Maybe when they were young they played more music, or really wanted x instrument. Buying a gorgeous guitar has a lot of bittersweet emotions to it, perhaps.

    The joke is they don’t realise we pros don’t have any more time to practice let alone play purely for pleasure, because we’re all doing other stuff like teaching, driving (a lot) and doing endless paperwork haha. But at least we get to play gigs for people who love the music.
    That's me, sir. I could never cut it as a pro player, but when I do stop and play, I want that regret, that longing, to find some satisfaction. For some reason, I associate that with Martins in the world of acoustics, and Gibsons in the world of archtops. I know my talents and skills are not worthy of these fine instruments, but they give me something to live up to, in a strange sort of manner.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    I know my talents and skills are not worthy of these fine instruments

    So you're telling me that we should drive shit cars, if we are bad drivers? Our driving skills don't make us worthy of better?


    Wouldn't common sense dictate that if you're a lousy driver then you'd be better off driving one of the better cars and not something cheap?


    I'll stop now .. but it is one of my pet peeves. That whole bad players shouldn't have expensive guitar gate keeping is really mental imho .. Pure penis envy if you ask me.

    It's my (and yours) hard earned money we're talking about here ..

    5000$ on something non guitar related like a holiday, motorcycle (can you even get a 5000$ motorcycle) or whatever .. Hey that's normal
    5000$ on a Gibson archtop .. Hey dude, have you earned the right to play that?? Insane!

  23. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    So you're telling me that we should drive shit cars, if we are bad drivers? Our driving skills don't make us worthy of better?


    Wouldn't common sense dictate that if you're a lousy driver then you'd be better off driving one of the better cars and not something cheap?


    I'll stop now .. but it is one of my pet peeves. That whole bad players shouldn't have expensive guitar gate keeping is really mental imho .. Pure penis envy if you ask me.

    It's my (and yours) hard earned money we're talking about here ..

    5000$ on something non guitar related like a holiday, motorcycle (can you even get a 5000$ motorcycle) or whatever .. Hey that's normal
    5000$ on a Gibson archtop .. Hey dude, have you earned the right to play that?? Insane!
    Your'e totally over-reacting. I expressed an emotion. Nothing more or less. Just a feeling.

  24. #73

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    FWIW, I have very nice guitars including Gibsons which I love. That said, the guitar I play most often is my Memphis El300 Matsumoto.

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Your'e totally over-reacting. I expressed an emotion. Nothing more or less. Just a feeling.
    Nonsense .. I'm not over reacting .. just being in full blown internet mode.

    I find it great that you're in awe of your instruments .. but with regards to deserving them .. off course you do. They inspire and allow you to get the best out of your (however limited) talent


    Cheers Lawson

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Nonsense .. I'm not over reacting .. just being in full blown internet mode.

    I find it great that you're in awe of your instruments .. but with regards to deserving them .. off course you do. They inspire and allow you to get the best out of your (however limited) talent


    Cheers Lawson
    "full blown internet mode"-that makes my day!

    Thanks.

  27. #76

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    I remember a review of a Gibson Super 400 where the reviewer wrote that it is the kind of guitar that when you show up to a gig with it, the cats will have some pretty high expectations of your playing.

    Here's the thing: When I show up to a gig with my Gibson Super 400, I have a pretty high expectation of my own playing. Now I would have that expectation with a Squier Strat as well, but the Super 400 will inspire my playing so much more. That said, I would not take the Super 400 to an outdoor bar gig that pays $100. I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio for those gigs, a guitar that is not overly expensive , but still inspires my playing better than a Squier Strat (or Korean DA....and I have owned a couple of those).

    Did I mention Gibsons rule?

  28. #77

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    They are for playing...

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Your'e totally over-reacting. I expressed an emotion. Nothing more or less. Just a feeling.
    Hey! It's more than a feeling.
    When I hear that old song they used to play and I begin dreaming.
    'Til I see Marianne walk away, of course.

  30. #79

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    if their gear cheaper than mine = loser
    if their gear is more expensive than mine = they suck


  31. #80

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    Seems fair!

  32. #81

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    I've got a fair number of old archtops.

    Nothing "top shelf" I suppose because as it turns out I've always been quite happy with guitars like my two L-7's, a '52 ES-150, a '57 ES-225 and a hodge podge of lesser and middle of the road Epiphones and Guilds.

    So nothing to brag about....the few times I post pics or details about any of these, its meant to be more of a "show and tell" thing where I'm happy to maybe flush out a few like minded kindreds out there.
    I just love these old things.....and all the subtle differences, stories and history.
    I'm not buying and sampling so many these days and have learned what I like.
    So as it should be, now I spend more time working on my guitar (and flute) playing.

    I'm just as happy to play and show off my old well played '60 Guild T-50 as anything else I have. Its fun to watch how such a modest "student" guitar surprises visiting players in a very positive way. People want to take it home...but its worth a lot to keep and not enough to sell!

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by P.J.
    I think the obsession with gear minutia is quite silly. You would not ask a neighbor who has a great lawn what kind of mower he or she uses. Or what kind of oil he or she uses in said mower.
    I got asked this question just this week by the adjacent property owner, it wasn't because my "lawn" looks great it was because we both have a lot of grass to cut (5 acres+). And one should check the forums on lawn mowing e.g. LawnSite, one would find a lot of similar discussions. I had to replace my old lawn tractor this year and I spent more on this lawn mower than any guitar I've purchased in the past 20 years, its worth more than my truck. It pained me to spend this kind of money on a mower but it cut my mowing time from 5 hours to 3 and my back and butt were most appreciative.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob taft
    Agree totally and for the life of me, I don't understand the repeated discussions. I don't give a whit what other folks spend their money on but we seem to have a small subset folks on "gear" forums of all places who feel it necessary to question or analyze why someone decides to play X guitar when according to them Y is cheaper,better or some other attribute that is critical to the commentator. Play what you want to play, play what you can afford, play what stokes your muse, above all just play.

    I own guitars from many different mfgs including Asian. In fact my second oldest guitar is an Aria Pro II Johnny Smith copy from 77'. I would have loved to buy the real thing in 77' but given my financial condition at the time it was the best I could afford. When I arrived at a point in my life where I had enough disposable income to enjoy the fruits of my labor, I still purchased what moved me. If having the name Gibson on the head stock moves you and provides inspiration an motivation, who am I to question that desire. In full disclosure I also own 3 Gibsons. That said, I purchased them because they spoke to me and inspired me to play. In the words of Frank Zappa "Shut up 'n play yer guitar.
    The guitar don't know where it came from.

    A good musician can make music with what is at hand. Headstocks don't matter near as much as soundholes, I reckon.

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Talk talk talk .. It's so easy to say stuff like this, but without examples it means little.


    But when you dig into concrete examples of guitar ... suddenly you find that those big brand guitars aren't necessarily more expensive than others ... or worse for that matter.

    There are so many brands these days and competition is stiff .. so usually you get what you pay for.


    Off course if you can provide specific examples where a traditional brand gets smoked by a non-traditional one then please do. I doubt it tho
    The guitar is just as good, or as bad, as the guitarist.

    Of course some guitars have defects which hamper playing at times. But in my opinion, a good guitarist can make a crap guitar sound better than a crappy guitarist can make a gem sound, well, crappy. (For the record, I'm the crappy guitarist making the classic sound like shit.)

  36. #85

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    In my younger days I used to only buy brand names, and usually high end models, I did not even bother looking at other guitars.

    Nowadays, I really enjoy playing cheap guitars as well.

    And in all honesty, cheap guitars today are a lot better than they used to be

  37. #86

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    I have to be honest I do make a big deal (without the too) about the brand of my gear.
    I grew up as the child of a semi pro guitar player who once he got his Gibson in 1974, never looked back...
    Being quite a metalhead back in the days, I walked my own path buying cheap spiky planks in the late '80s and when the '90s came bought my Lester.
    Currently besides my Bass and a Frankenstein Warmoth mahogany telecaster that could have easily come out of a Gibson factory, I only have 3 guitars and they sport the open book and Gibson logo.
    I am very partial to the brand but not in any statement making way, it has a lot to do with what I know and expect !

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinlander
    I have to be honest I do make a big deal (without the too) about the brand of my gear.
    I grew up as the child of a semi pro guitar player who once he got his Gibson in 1974, never looked back...
    Being quite a metalhead back in the days, I walked my own path buying cheap spiky planks in the late '80s and when the '90s came bought my Lester.
    Currently besides my Bass and a Frankenstein Warmoth mahogany telecaster that could have easily come out of a Gibson factory, I only have 3 guitars and they sport the open book and Gibson logo.
    I am very partial to the brand but not in any statement making way, it has a lot to do with what I know and expect !

    Cheap guitars in the 80's were usually really bad.
    Very big difference from todays cheap guitars.
    Last edited by greveost; 06-06-2020 at 02:21 PM.

  39. #88

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    One of those cheap guitars in the 80s was the Tanara ST-3, a Korean Strat copy I picked up in my first year at college for $105, including tax. The craftsmanship was decent. But I dreamed about owning a “real” Stratocaster. Funny thing is that I gigged three nights a week with that cheapie Korean Strat copy and came to really love it.

    As a graduation gift, I bought my first Fender and sold the Tanara. The Fender was good but a little dull and lifeless where the Tanara was resonant and “alive” feeling. I almost immediately began to regret my choice to ditch the one for the other.

    This experience and dozens of others over the ensuing 25 to 30 years really showed me that each guitar is an individual and should be judged on its own merits. I have bought and sold dozens of strats until finding 3 that I really connect with. Similarly, I have owned many Gibson’s and sold most of them until I winnowed it down to a few choice instruments (for me).

    That said, the guitars I leave sitting out, and that get the most playtime at home (not gigging these days) are not my Gibbys (which I love and have come into through much exploration) but my Epi Broadway (made in China) and my Ibby LGB30 (made in Indonesia). They are both superb instruments with fat electrified jazz tone. The Epi set me back $550 (edit: $500 w/case!). The Ibby, about $940 (edit: w/case). I love them.

    I really like guitars of all makes and prices but tend to keep the ones that connect with me. A bit like the incoming first-year Hogwarts students and their visit to Ollivander’s wand shop. There, they learn that the wizard does not choose the wand... the wand chooses the wizard.

    Have a wonderful Saturday and get those guitars out and play them!

    Roli
    Last edited by rolijen; 06-06-2020 at 04:47 PM.

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    DO YOU SERIOUSLY WANT TO START IN ON LAWN MOWERS!!

    Kidding!
    I’m a Lawn-Boy guy. Just had my self-propelled push mower die that I bought back in 2007. Gonna miss that thing!, lol.

  41. #90

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    The funny thing for me is that I could care less about the name on the guitar as long as it’s well made and set up right. But I am this way on suits, not so much for the name, but because I want something fully lined or for hot weather, unlined but well tailored. It’s not about the name, but about the way it sits on me. You can get an suit with a fused lining to sit right, but it is harder to tailor. But I find that Brooks Brothers, Zegna, and Hart Shafner Max seem to fit almost perfect off the rack and give the fit and lie I am looking for.

  42. #91

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    Still using my 1999 Lawn Boy.

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    Still using my 1999 Lawn Boy.
    I’m torn about replacing the carb or buying a new mower. It has a sens-a-speed so the self propelled speed matches whatever speed I’m walking. They don’t make that anymore.

  44. #93

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    Yeah, Lawn Boy is gone. When my independent repair guy says "that's it," I will go shopping. So far though...

  45. #94

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    What about a company that wants to develope a reputation(a name) and it starts out making nice guitars for reasonable prices.As a result they get talked about and even carried by reputable stores.Wasnt too many years ago life existed with out name brands like Eastman or Godin.I think may have found one.I posted a video well im to embarrassed to do that but my wife and son tricked me into it on FB and a what i thought was a private channel youtube post.One response was "Is that a Blonde Gibson?"from someone representing a group i was hoping to impress.Why did it not sound right taking control of the situation.They sung its praises and i just said great any request?Another was from one of my favorite players Marcos Pin (Duology)
    mentioning my beautiful guitar in a compliment.I was humbled and floored.Its an Eastman 403.Check Marcos out on youtube.

  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    thats the emotional investment I’m talking about ... it’s often expressed at gigs by the middle aged dude who comes up to after a gig and insists on talking about guitars. similarly on this forum.

    People just want to be involved in music really. They might feel on some level they’ve sacrificed their chance to be involved to be involved in music 24/7 but at least they can have seriously nice guitars. There might be a bit of regret there, a bit of longing. Maybe when they were young they played more music, or really wanted x instrument. Buying a gorgeous guitar has a lot of bittersweet emotions to it, perhaps.

    The joke is they don’t realise we pros don’t have any more time to practice let alone play purely for pleasure, because we’re all doing other stuff like teaching, driving (a lot) and doing endless paperwork haha. But at least we get to play gigs for people who love the music.

    I was a golf pro for 10 years and almost never got to play outside of competing in State tournaments. The Members at the club and friends thought all we do is play. Sounds familiar.

    Also, the members would always look in your golf bag and see what clubs you were playing. Alot of them knew more about equipment than I did.
    Sounds familar

  47. #96

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    Check this baby out. Just sharpened her blades and adjusted the cutter bar last week. Zoom zoom.
    Attached Images Attached Images Do We Make Too Big A Deal About Certain Brands of Gear?-img_20200608_080124-jpg 

  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by Littlemark
    Check this baby out. Just sharpened her blades and adjusted the cutter bar last week. Zoom zoom.
    That is a sweet ride.

  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by Littlemark
    Check this baby out. Just sharpened her blades and adjusted the cutter bar last week. Zoom zoom.
    Your ManCard just got double-punched!

  50. #99

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    I have a video of a world class player (a name you'd know) playing Out of Nowhere on my Yamaha cheapie (Pacifica 012) through a Crate GFX15 (which sold new at GC for either $99 or $79).

    His comment about the guitar was, "excellent playability, I think this is the guitar for you". I think he was too polite to say anything about the tone, since he usually plays a $16,000 archtop. But, as expected, he sounded great.

  51. #100

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    RESALE! That's why companies and old Rock groups end up suing each other over owning the brand! No pun intended.