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  1. #51

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    For the love of god, can someone tell me why I don't like these? I'm disinterested in all that vintage / historial crap, I just like good guitars and good sounds. I don't care about tube amps, I use a digital modeler. When I was having new pickups wound, I could not care less about the level of PAF authenticity, just give me a nice and midrangey humbucker... Why don't I like the ergonomic guitars?!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob taft
    Have you considered contacting Alistair at Emerald Guitars for a headless guitar. He has already made one and with the mold already made the cost should be reasonable. In 2015, I played the headless pictured on his website and the build quality was exceptional.
    I like all the gears and the glowing lights. Very steampunk!


  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr quick
    For the love of god, can someone tell me why I don't like these? I'm disinterested in all that vintage / historial crap, I just like good guitars and good sounds. I don't care about tube amps, I use a digital modeler. When I was having new pickups wound, I could not care less about the level of PAF authenticity, just give me a nice and midrangey humbucker... Why don't I like the ergonomic guitars?!
    Because...



    ???

  5. #54

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    The Original 6 look very good imho. Look even better in red. The other one look like a melted tele, and not in an appealing way.

    I've been eyeing the O6 because my back want me to find a lightweight guitar. AFAIK they sound good and it's a well thought out instrument. I'm not sure I'd be onboard with that neck
    Last edited by Average Joe; 04-25-2020 at 07:18 AM.

  6. #55

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    Between those two, I much prefer the first one.

  7. #56

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    I would go with the dual humbucker one. The Tele style looks a bit goofy/ ironic.

  8. #57
    Hi Jim,

    Greetings from Portland. I just bought a standard Strandberg with S, S, H. So far I like it a lot.

  9. #58

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    I find that the headless guitar is good for playing seated, especially if you like the neck in a higher position.

    Works for me.


  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    I find that the headless guitar is good for playing seated, especially if you like the neck in a higher position.

    Works for me.

    How do you fret with your left hand thumb with that technique?

  11. #60

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    i had the top one for a week. It was the chambered version. I liked the guitar in general but the pickups were overly hot, i didn't like the pickup placement with the 24 frets and it was neck heavy when standing. That seemed to violate the ergo moniker for me so I returned it.

    If I were buying a headless guitar today, I would get a forshage.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    How do you fret with your left hand thumb with that technique?
    You don't. I can't remember the last time I fretted a string with my left thumb.

  13. #62

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    oh, another thing I was going to mention on the strandberg is that the asymetrical neck carve I found very uncomfortable

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I like the cubist tele
    Me too. Otherwise they look a bit like a solution for a problem I've yet to have. But I would like to try one just out of curiosity. I'd like to know what the neck shape and fanned frets do.

  15. #64

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    This headless body design is great for my seated playing position. The Endura type neck does make you play in a classical style with the thumb behind the middle of the neck. The solid body model is definitely not neck heavy, I don't know about the chambered. The pickups can be changed, I have 7K PAF Zebra's in my headless and Jazz humbuckers in my other headless.

    It works great for me and that's what matters.


  16. #65

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    Do they make a neck with fewer than 24 frets? I want the neck pup at that spot.

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Do they make a neck with fewer than 24 frets? I want the neck pup at that spot.
    Doesn't this only work if you play only open strings/chords?

    When you fret a note I'd imagine that the pickup position to string vibration moves also.

    I'm not sure of the physics.

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    i had the top one for a week. It was the chambered version. I liked the guitar in general but the pickups were overly hot, i didn't like the pickup placement with the 24 frets and it was neck heavy when standing. That seemed to violate the ergo moniker for me so I returned it.

    If I were buying a headless guitar today, I would get a forshage.

    Here's one for you Jack, it definitely won't be neck heavy with that 8 string bridge, they build a 6 string:


    Normal neck profile:

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    Doesn't this only work if you play only open strings/chords?

    When you fret a note I'd imagine that the pickup position to string vibration moves also.

    I'm not sure of the physics.
    No, I'm not one of those guitar players who think having the pickup at an open string node point gives it mystical powers, I just like the sweet sound of a neck pickup over the bridge pup, and when you have 24 frets, that causes the neck pickup to be moved the wrong way! That part of my guitar neck is dusty anyway -- I don't need 24 frets.
    Last edited by BigDaddyLoveHandles; 10-20-2020 at 12:25 PM.

  20. #69

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    These Aristides headless guitars from Holland are very interesting, they have a composite body/neck material called magically "Arium".

    A big claim. "the result is an instrument in which sound is able to travel uninhibited in 3 dimensions, for the ultimate performance in resonance, sustain, clarity, and articulation."

    Production process | Aristides Instruments

    History | Aristides Instruments

    Aristides Instruments | Aristides Instruments


  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    These Aristides headless guitars from Holland are very interesting, they have a composite body/neck material called magically "Arium".

    A big claim. "the result is an instrument in which sound is able to travel uninhibited in 3 dimensions, for the ultimate performance in resonance, sustain, clarity, and articulation."

    Production process | Aristides Instruments

    History | Aristides Instruments

    Aristides Instruments | Aristides Instruments

    I've always liked what they've done at Aristides. My only problem with them is that their prices are beyond my budget.

  22. #71

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    My issue with most of the new designs including the Parker Fly, is they displace the neck pickup from the 22nd fret. For me that is the Sweet Spot for Jazz tone.

    Also they seem more designed to be a neutral tonality,to take advantage of processing with eq and other effects. Wonderful if your into that Allan Holdsworth type of tone!

  23. #72

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  24. #73

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    Strandberg Guitars-9eb1e8b1-4ecd-4cf4-8955-1e60c65cb451-jpg
    I made my own, as a travel guitar. The bridge is a cheapie Chinese made one but it works.

    the neck pickup is an SD P-Rails

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Now that's a cool guitar!

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    Doesn't this only work if you play only open strings/chords?

    When you fret a note I'd imagine that the pickup position to string vibration moves also.

    I'm not sure of the physics.
    No, that's not the case. It's a simply matter of the pickup position relative to the note. No matter what fret you are playing on, the pickup position that's closest to the fretted note will yield the warmer sound. And I've owned enough 24 fret guitars to know that they have a bright, nasallyness that I don't care for. If you think carefully you'll understand that your hypothesis doesn't make sense. Otherwise, a bridge and neck pickup would sound identical on everything but the open string.

    There is also the physics of more neck mass which I also firmly believe in - having owned a half dozen headless guitars. I get the ergo thing and there was a point where my back and neck were so bad that I had to play sitting 100% of the time and wanted the weight savings but ironically my ash tele weighs less than the carvin headless guitars I owned (5.9lbs)! When I had the pawar privateer body the guitar was something like 5.4lbs!

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    Now that's a cool guitar!
    Saul Koll.

  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    There is also the physics of more neck mass which I also firmly believe in - having owned a half dozen headless guitars.
    Would headless guitar + a variant of The Fat Finger be a possible solution to this?


  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    No, that's not the case. It's a simply matter of the pickup position relative to the note. No matter what fret you are playing on, the pickup position that's closest to the fretted note will yield the warmer sound. And I've owned enough 24 fret guitars to know that they have a bright, nasallyness that I don't care for. If you think carefully you'll understand that your hypothesis doesn't make sense. Otherwise, a bridge and neck pickup would sound identical on everything but the open string.
    Excellent explanation, many thanks Jack.

    The pickup is further away on from the bridge on the 22 fret guitar, so the string has a longer vibration.

    It's a very interesting subject, an intriguing phenomenon.
    Last edited by GuyBoden; 10-23-2020 at 08:02 AM.

  30. #79

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    Someone on another forum posted this:


  31. #80

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    Also, few of the iconic solid body guitars (Teles, Strats, LPs, SGs) have variations with 24 frets. Players aren't clamouring for it.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Also, few of the iconic solid body guitars (Teles, Strats, LPs, SGs) have variations with 24 frets. Players aren't clamouring for it.
    The 24 fret, so called SuperStrats have been very popular in the modern era, but I know what you mean.

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    The 24 fret, so called SuperStrats have been very popular in the modern era, but I know what you mean.
    Yeah, I didn't turn quite the right phrase. They many have 24 fret submodels, but the percentage of total models sold with 24 frets is small.