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  1. #51

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    Gabor Szabo played Martin D-45 and D-28.


    I dabble with Martin flat tops, currently a 2015 00-18V .
    Last edited by bohemian46; 04-06-2020 at 10:14 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    I have a 1976 Martin 000-28 that I bought new. I have other flat-tops - a Vagabond Travel Guitar and a Gibson Parlor Rosewood Modern 2019 (seriously, that's what it's called) which was a gift, but the Martin is all I need. By the way, before I bought the 000-28 I had a 1970 D-41 which I hand-picked from 3 samples. Everything about it was gorgeous, but it was just too big for me - I felt like I was hugging a tree when I played it.

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by msr13
    I’ve been thoroughly enjoying a Webber 00. It’s been so much fun. Pardon the poor playing and I haven’t figured out how to record non-amplified very well... but fun nonetheless.

    Webber guitars out of North Vancouver? A local builder.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    Webber guitars out of North Vancouver? A local builder.
    Yes. David Webber. A wonderful luthier. I believe he retired a couple of years ago. But his guitars are still available at a few shops new. And used, they are great deals.

  6. #55

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    Martin 000-16GT...

    I bought it recently.

    I always loved Martins but never thought I would get one soon... I tried this one occasionally in the shop, there were also other Martins, Taylor and Matons...

    I bought it though the retail price was pretty high...

    Before that I played luthier-made (small local worshop GMD) flattop - OM type, it was beautiful sonorous guitar - all solid body, solid cedar top - nice slotted head - but when I played that Martin at home in comparison - the tone and balance was so much more balanced and complex...

    You know on that old guitar I played the tune and it was generallly the tune... when I played the same song on Martin I noticed how many things actually happend there - how many things I can do.

    There is also interesting thing - that other guitar I had seemed to be louder and quicker response than Martin, more straight forward and easier to play...
    (Good Martins in general in my opinion are not easy guitars to play really well (they are more demanding on your technique and control)
    But when I played for the others - they said that they actually hear no difference in volume and that Martin sounds actually very different both in picking and strumming... my daughter said that old guitar sounds 'like a picture of cathedral, and the new one like real cathedral with demensions'.

    I know 000-16 is considered cheaper end but I tried recently 000-28 (I would not have bought it anyway - too pricey for the moment)... and it was great but in my opinion there is nothing that makes 000-16 worse.. it is different, yes... but not worse.

    My dream is to find one day good old seasoned flattop...

    Here are both of them, that GMD is not bad at all too considering the price especially wich is 3 times cheaper than Martin.
    Attached Images Attached Images Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-20200409_100819-jpg Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-20200409_100843-jpg 
    Last edited by Jonah; 04-09-2020 at 03:19 AM.

  7. #56

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    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.
    The same D'Addario Chrome extra lights (10 to 48) as my electric. On the X10 I'm also tuned down to C#. I don't trade platability for anything.

  9. #58

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    What did Kenny Burrell use in this concert. He plays a few tunes with just the acoustic. This version he swaps it out. He sounds great to me .


  10. #59

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    Over the years a few pretty nice flat-tops have come and gone, ranging from a '61 Martin D28 and 30s Gibson L-00s to a Gurian S3R.

    But since I don't play flat-top often this Tacoma C1C Chief is it now. In Martin terms it's like an OM with a 00-size upper bout -- long scale but very comfy. It was inexpensive, sturdy, sounds great at home and plugs in really well. The bolt-on neck means it can be easily set-up just right.


  11. #60

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    I love my Larrivee C-09. Rosewood with cedar top. Amazing tone.

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-larrivee-c-09_2-jpg

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.
    When I first started to play acoustic-style guitars (including electric archtops) I used .011s (extra light) until I could work up to the .012s. For most acoustic guitar applications, .012s are about as light as you want to go because acoustic guitars need a little string heft to drive the top and create enough volume and a rich tone.

  13. #62

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    The main one is a yairi masterworks 12 fret slope shouldered sort of oddball. Wide nut, slotted headstock, rosewood back and sides. Kind of specific, but a damn masterpiece to play, listen to and smell.

    The rest are all small bodies: an om, a 12 string om, a baritone om, and a baby all hog guild m20. All weird and distinct and fun.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.
    D'addario 12's... (I used to use 13's on jumbo when I had one)

    Martin had their own strings but they are a bit too soft for my feel...

    I have no problem with switching for heavy gauges (I play lutes where tension is about 4 times lighter than on steel string acoustic).

    But I have quite low action - really at the edge of buzz.. I elaborated some kind of picking that allows me to avoid buzzing

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    The same D'Addario Chrome extra lights (10 to 48) as my electric. On the X10 I'm also tuned down to C#. I don't trade platability for anything.
    I have always preferred the lighter gauges, but have went up to Lights (in know... not so heavy ), specifically D'Addario EJ16s 12-53 and the sounds are wonderful. It did require getting used to, but the playability migrates. At some point, on my bigger guitar, I'll probably try higher still.

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    what gauge strings do you people use?
    I'm used to playing electrics so the heavier gauge strings I use (lights 12) comes at a cost to playibility.
    It really depends on the guitar. For most, I play .012"-.053" or .054". On a few of my guitars, I swap out the .016" B for a .017" and the .012" E for a .013". My scale lengths vary from 24.9" to 25.4" which also influences sting tension decision. I like my trebles, particularly when you play in the upper registers to have some solidity to them and not sound "plinky".

  17. #66

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    Thanks, guys. I currently use Martin Retro Monel Light (12). I can lower the action at the bridge but then I can't use the guitar for traditional acoustic rhythm playing so easily.

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    My Emerald X7

    and my Emerald X10
    Hi Jim

    Forgive me if this has been answered before, how do you like the X7? A production 12 fret with a cutaway is very attractive but the 24" scale is a question. Coming as the builder of long-scale Swan guitars, how did you find the change? How does it sound acoustically. I know it sounds great as recorded by you. The guitar would be over $3,000 cdn so I need to do my due diligence.

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry
    Over the years a few pretty nice flat-tops have come and gone, ranging from a '61 Martin D28 and 30s Gibson L-00s to a Gurian S3R.

    But since I don't play flat-top often this Tacoma C1C Chief is it now. In Martin terms it's like an OM with a 00-size upper bout -- long scale but very comfy. It was inexpensive, sturdy, sounds great at home and plugs in really well. The bolt-on neck means it can be easily set-up just right.

    I had one like this, gave it to a pal.

    Excellent guitar with exceptionally sweet trebles!

    Congratulations on your good taste.

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    Hi Jim

    Forgive me if this has been answered before, how do you like the X7? A production 12 fret with a cutaway is very attractive but the 24" scale is a question. Coming as the builder of long-scale Swan guitars, how did you find the change? How does it sound acoustically. I know it sounds great as recorded by you. The guitar would be over $3,000 cdn so I need to do my due diligence.
    The acoustic tone is probably not something I should comment on much. I'm not really an acoustic player and I have it strung with Chrome Extra Light strings and the action as low as it will go. SO there's not really much acoustic voice left. But the playability is outstanding. It's a really clever design that takes advantage of the materials and build process to provide incredible upper fret access for a 12 fret guitar. The area where a heel would normally be is comply scooped and I can play complex chords at the 15th fret without much trouble. It's really a fun guitar but truly expensive, especially in Canada. I bought my two after I had had a bit of a financial windfall so I didn't have to think too much about it too much but I can sure see why it would cause second thoughts.

  21. #70

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    Since I was a flat-top guy for decades before I fell for this archtop thing, I have owned a fair number of them.

    My favorites have always been Martin dreadnoughts, and my gigging one for the last decade or so was my D-18 Authentic 1937. I am also quite fond of my D-28 Authentic 1931, however, which is a 12-fret monster. The D-18A has been great for laying down bass-and-rhythm.

    My friends who are real jazz guitarists, however, have paid particular attention to my Running Dog minijumbo, made for me by Rick Davis (now retired). It's neck is much less chunky than a Martin dread, and the action is lower than on my Martins (I always basically played factory action, with medium gauge strings, on the Martins), and uses light gauge strings.

    It has an Italian spruce top and bubinga back and sides, and is an absolute beauty.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    My dream is to find one day good old seasoned flattop...
    You might keep an eye out for a D-16H. They were built for a few brief years in the early 90s, and sold as NAMM show floor specials with slight cosmetic variations. I think most if not all have a herringbone rosette and back strip inlay. All the ones I’ve seen also have snowflake fret markers. They are all-solid mahogany dreads with a dovetail neck joint and scalloped bracing. Satin finish throughout and aging toner on the Sitka spruce tops. Sometimes referred to as a poor man’s D-18 because in all other respects might as well be one. Mine is light as a feather and every one I’ve played is similar. For whatever reason these have never appreciated much on the vintage market - when they come up for sale they are usually priced below $1500. Just a crazy low price for a 30 year old Martin. Here’s a typical listing.

    A good modern alternative is a new D-15M. You can season it yourself! I picked one up to noodle on while window shopping at Gryphon a few months ago and was gobsmacked by the feel, tone and workmanship. (These are all factory-Plek’d. Martin has stepped their game up so much in recent years.) I am *not* a fan of mahogany topped Martins but this one was just clear, resonant and lovely as can be. All solid, $1200 for a brand new guitar. I played it for 20 minutes, then looked more carefully at it. When I saw the snowflake fretboard inlays I knew I was f*@&ing hooked.

    Forgot to mention that the bridge, fingerboard, heel cap and peghead overlays on those 90s D-16H models are Brazilian rosewood. Thought I'd share some pics of these distant cousins.

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_1288-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_7345-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_0215-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_7914-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_8853-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_2292-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_5475-jpgFavorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-img_4373-jpg
    Last edited by lukmanohnz; 04-12-2020 at 03:08 PM.

  23. #72

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    Copy everything that he just said and swap in "guild" for "Martin". Plenty of cheap veterans from the 60s-90s out there, and they also have a current hog top dread offering. It's an interesting concept. Just a thought.

    Though I'd be remiss if I didn't mention how pretty his are. That's a silky top.

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet
    Copy everything that he just said and swap in "guild" for "Martin". Plenty of cheap veterans from the 60s-90s out there, and they also have a current hog top dread offering. It's an interesting concept. Just a thought.

    Though I'd be remiss if I didn't mention how pretty his are. That's a silky top.
    Guilds are such great guitars too. I had an all mahogany Guild D25 a long, long time ago. That was a sweet guitar.

  25. #74

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    Strings,

    I use 12s on my 0000s (M/Jumbo size but shallow like a 00, 000 or OM) and dreadnaughts.

    I use 11s on 00s and 000s and OMs.

    Another two thumbs up for the early D-16H model, simply outstanding.

    I very much like the dreads but too large.
    However the slope shoulder S models such as the D-18S ( and variants) and my D-35s\S.. all with 12 frets and slotted headstocks, 1 7/8ths nut width are my favorites of the dreads.

    Another fine flattop is the Gibson WM 45.. a sleeper..

  26. #75

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    My D-28 Authentic 1931:

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-whole-jpg Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-back2-jpg
    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-front-jpg

    My D-18 Authentic 1937:

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-fullfront-jpg

    Both with "medium" gauge strings (for acoustic flat tops, medium means .013 - .056).

  27. #76

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    I really love my Waterloo WL-14 LTR.
    Great sustain and sensitivity. Barks when you whomp on it.
    Collings-level playability, and fit and finish.
    Awesome guitar.

  28. #77

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    Before I became a "jazz guy" wannabe, I was a long time fingerpicking,
    ragtime, country blues wannabe. I've owned dozens of acoustic guitars
    and when I bought a Martin 000-18GE in 2015 from my local guitar
    pusher I said that I have found my guitar and he can expect to never
    sell me another Martin guitar again. Five years later, still true to my word.

    Though the guitar has a mahogany Martin tone that goes all the way back
    to 1833, it's not suitable for the kind of jazz playing that now interests me.

  29. #78

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    For jazz I prefer maple or mahogany back and side flat tops. Extra zing and bass typical of quality rosewood acoustics are not ideal for faster jazz single lines IMO.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 04-16-2020 at 06:45 AM.

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by bohemian46
    Gabor Szabo played Martin D-45 and D-28.


    I dabble with Martin flat tops, currently a 2015 00-18V .
    Thanks for mentioning Gabor Szabo. I saw him live in Los Angeles back in the early 70's. At that show he played his D-45, broke a string while performing "Spellbinder" but never missed a beat! He played most of the tune with the remaining 5 strings. Amazing artist.

  31. #80

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    I’m not suggesting it’s a choice as a “serious” instrument, but the middy/honky/nasal sound of my Baby Taylor works pretty well for jazz imho. Better than the chime of the Yamaha LJ I once owned.

    it’s a wonky little beater though

  32. #81

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    My recently acquired Steven Grimes Larry Coryell model. I custom ordered it about a year ago and Steve did an amazing job. Still opening up, plays like a dream at least for my large hands. Baggs electronics sound great through the AER 60.

  33. #82

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    [QUOTE=Ukena;1024765]My D-28 Authentic 1931:

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-whole-jpg






    . . . /QUOTE]
    My SD 50 is the Larrivee version of this guitar. I may get a luthier to build one with a cutaway.

  34. #83

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    My dymr70sb is the yairi version of that Martin, except the weirdo Japanese version. It's an absolute monster, and maybe the most luxurious thing I own.

    How odd that three of us have such similar uncommon guitars in an archtop part of town. I'd love to see and hear more of your guitars

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by feet
    How odd that three of us have such similar uncommon guitars in an archtop part of town. I'd love to see and hear more of your guitars
    That is interesting, indeed. The main difference between the 3, aside from the builder, is the wood of the back & sides: the Martin has Madagascar rosewood, the Yairi has E. Indian RW, and the Larrivee, mahogany.

    What fun it would be to hear all 3 in the same room!

  36. #85

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    i found a video of mine that's a pretty good representation of what that guitar is. It just has an inherent chocolaty-ness; a smooth darkness to it, but so very deep. Endless power and volume when you hit it hard but super responsive to gentle picking, too. Really big bottom on it for the folks into that.

    Sometimes I think I'd like to have a more "normal" guitar around, but this thing is just too cool.

    It's my only experience with rosewood, so I don't know how Madagascar compares to Indian.

  37. #86

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    I have two Taylors, but I would like to get a Martin as well eventually, probably a D16. I put elixir 12s on the smaller one, and 13s on the dreadnaught.

    Favorite flat tops of jazz guys around here?-20170120_194921-jpg